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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 29, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE MIC

GANIL

LILY

PLUNKETT TELLS
OF NAVAL HISTORY

_ ._ _
-,

t

IUHM y IfliLII
ASTERN S ATI
dREE K REVOLUTI (O IST MARCh
ON CAPITAL AS GEORE
FSUCCEEDIS TO CROWN
SULTAN HAS ABDICATED-
'IS UNOFFICIAL REPORT
Rellenic .a.pitai. Now in Hands of
Triumvirate of Army
Generals
It A1XETI N
Pais Sept. 23.-M:'-3tflefalCe1 IV, Sul-
tan of Turkey, has abdicated i favori
of the heir apparent, Prince Abdul
Medjid Effendi, according to u report
from the Navas corresp1ondent at Con-
statinople. The news, he adds, has
not een as yet officially announced.
Prince Abdul Medji b, who is a cousin
of the.Sultan, was born in 1868.
London, Sept. 28.-The British cab-
inet held three successive meetings
today, and anoter nieeting will be held
tomorrow morning. This fact alone is
sufricient comment on the gravity of
the situation in the Aear east.
The Greek revolution, which was a
military and navy coup, seems to have
been carried out with surprising
swiftness and completeness. Infor-
mation regarding Constantine is mea-
ger, but one report had it that he
was a prisoner of the revolutionists.
Prince on Throne
The Crown Prince succeeds to the
throne, while the victorious troops
with their leaders at their heads,
march triumphantly into Athens,
which pending the formation of a new
government, is in the hands of a mil-
itary dictatorship in the shape of a
triumvirate council of generals. One
of the generals is said to be the fam-
ous General Mider who for a long
time was chief of staff and war min-
'ister under the Venielos administra-
tion, and commanded the Greek expe-
ditionary .corps operating in south
Russia in 1918.
Atpparent y the revolution was
bloodless, although an unconfirmed
report mentions the killing of one
,minister.
Turks in Neutral Zone
Latest advices are to the effect that
there has been no collision between
Turkish and British forces in the
Chanak zone, and that seems to be
the only satisfying aspect of a very
threatening situation. Friendly mes-
sages have been..=exchanged between
Genera li,te British .com-
inander at o stantinople and Kemal
Pasha, discussing their respective
viewpoints in . amicable manner,
but the Kermalists'show not the slight-"
est ;disposition to recede fron their
position, and xefuse to withdraw their
troops from the neutral zone.
Free Air Rides To
Be Given Students
T1 tickets entitling the holders to
a, trip in the aeroplane of Capt. Wal-
:er (',arr will he distributed free of
charge at the Majestic theater at 8:30
>clack tonight. The tickets will en-
able those who hold them to take the
rip either Sunday morning or after-

(Continued from Page One)
igan over here and there won't be
anything to this war," a remark which
he declared was inspired by the efforts
of Michigan men under his training.
All of these men are now successful,
said Plunkett, because they were
trained in grabbing opportunities.
Calls United States 'Rstl
Coming to the climax of his mes-
sage, Admiral Plunkett declared, "iMy
purpose here tonight is nothing more
than to say to you that this countrv
is the greatest country God ever
made. lIe intended this country to
do something big. The people need
nothing more than to be told the
truth." Plunkett went on to tell how
a justice of the Suproe Court had
just resigned his position that he
might tell the people of the United
States the truth. When you find a
man doing this, statedf the Ad miral,
"there must be something wrong."
Speaking of the University and its
purpose he said, "An institution of
this kind aims to unravel the truth
There is our hope and there the
foundation of our country lies
in our education."
Is Ent'ralled by Michigan
A #iral Plunkett placed a high es-
timate on Michigan as expressed in
his talk last night. "I have never
been so enthralled as I have been in
the three days I have been here. I
have met 21 gentlemen . of this fac-
ulty who hold the destiny of this in-
stitution in the hollowr of their hands.
And I want to say that, great God,
we a4'e safe!"
Referring to the other institutions
of education in the country, Admiral
Plunkett said, "You are outstripping
the East, which is bound up in con-
servatism that does not make for ad-
vancement or exansion.
"Education is thie great force which
points to the road wlich we are to
follow. We can follow ,the road only
when we have eople with ed'ucation
who can straighten the way. The
way Will not always be straight nor
will it be known. Research must
plunge into the future."
TUrges Work
In conclusion, Admiral Plunkett
urged the meth to work with all their1
energies: "I whatever you are en-I
gaged be 100 per cent in what you
do. I know that the people of this.
institution are not 100 per cent in
the football team. I want everyone
to go out to the field and get behind
the man out there."
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the
College of Engineering and 4rchitec-
ture, introduced the Admiral and the
entire smoker was under the direc-
tion of William A. Cotton, Jr., '23E,
presidpent of the Engineering society.
,.'Paul Wilson's orchestra gave the
muc for. the first part of the 'pro-
gram, while Robert Kenyon sang sev-
eral popular songs with two men at
the pianos, William C. Kratz, '24E,
and: Leslie E. Chappell, '25. Burton
E. L. Hyde, '25M, received a highly
enthusiastic welcome and had to re-
spond with several encores on his
great marimlbaphones.
ILLER'S ARBER SHOP
WM. A. MILLER, Prop.
Three First Class Barbers

AGIN IN LINEU
A E R IA L UA M E T O B E B U IL T U P
AIROUNI) RESTORED QUARTER
BACK STAR
(Special to The Daily)
Madison, Wis., Sept. 28.-Witlian
r'4licial' declaration from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin faculty that "Shor-
ty" Barr, football team quarterback,
will be eligible to participate in the
game this year Coach Richards will
now start to develop the attack he
has been planning since the practice
season started, Sept. 15.
Will Do Passing
The presence of the chubby quar-
terback in Wisconsin's backfield will
add a world of strength to the of-.
fense. Barr is probably one of the
best, if not the best, forward-passer
in the middle West. As. in former
years, the Badgers will depend upon
the aerial game for many of their
gains .and with Barr to hurl the pig-
skin and Withany of the ends or
backs to receive the passes, the
short, ofer the line, screened pass
will be the core of Richards' game.
In addition to being a good passer,
Barr is a heady field general and a
good drop-kicker. The Cardinals'
team will no doubt be built around
him. According to Walter Eckersall,
the Badgers will be contenders for the
Conference title. At any rate it is
certain that the Cardinals will have
a formidable eleven with the abund-
ance of material that they have on
hand.
Jineup Chosen
The varsity has been put through
several scrimmages the-past few days,
the lineup remaining unchanged with
Barr, Captain Williams,. Taft, and
Gibson in the backfield. Irish and
Tebell holding down the flank posi-
tions, Murray and Below at tackles,
and Christianson and Hohiles helping
Nickols in the center of the line.
The Wisconsin eleven is well sup-
ported by a strong second team which
will fill out the varsity in case of in-
juries that may occur during the sea-
son. In the line Smith, a husky-
looking char who was running mate
to "Marty" Below a few seasons back,
will no doubt give the guards a hard
fight for their jobs.
Lose something? A classified in
tho Daily will find it.-Adv.

UNDERCLASS GROUP
MEETS INFORMALLY I
Meeting for the first time this year,
the underclass conduct committee
held an inofrmal gathering at thel
Union last nightm toenable the mem-1
hers of the committee to become ac-1
quainted.
Due to the fact that the Student
council has not as yet selected theI
committee from the members that
will act in conjunction with the un-
derclass conduct committee in all its
aaffirs, the committee can take no of-
ficial atcion on any matters ebfore it.
It is expected that Vernon Hillery,
23, president of the tSudent council,
will apopint this committee within
the next few days and that business,
may be conducted at the next meet-
ing.
The underclass conduct committee
will holds its next meeting on next
Tuesday, Oct. 3.
INCREASED ENROLLMENT NOTED
IN NURSING TRAINING SCHOOL

Figures given out by the office of thef
Nurses' Training school show a sub-
stantial increase in the enrollment.
The total number of students taking.
the three-year course in nursing this
year is 201, which is an increase of 23-1
over last year's registration. There
are 68 seniors, 49 juniors, 13 sopho-
mores, and 71 freshmen, as compared
with 48 seniors, 39 juniors, 39 sopho-
mores, and 52 freshmen of last year,
Dean Jean Hamilton will address the
nurses Monday night in the amphi-
theater on the subject, "University
Unity."
CA THOLIC STUDENTS FORM
NEW CAMPUS HOUSE CLUB
To provide rooming and boarding
facilities under the proper condi-
tions, -isthe purpose of the newest
house club on the campus, a Catholic
organization, to be known as the
Richard club. Father Frank McQuil-
len, newly named assistant to Fa-
ther Burke, wil have charge of the
club for the coming year.
The club is named after Father
Richard, one of the founders of the
University of Michigan.

BRED, CITY UNEARTE
ON LAK SUPER1IORUH JR
ARCH AELOGIST FINIS FORMER
DWEL1INS IN M1INlN%'
COUiNTRY
(By Associated Press)
Duluth, Minn,. Sept. 28.-Working
from vague descriptions of a suppos-
edly ancient town near old copper
mine workings on Isle Royale, off the
north shore of Lake Superior, Wil-
liam P. F. Ferguson, of Franklin, Pa.,:
an archaeologist, found a series of
semi-underground dwellings which, he
said, were the remains of a city in-
habited 1,000 to 2,000 years ago.
Mr. Ferguson came out of the north
country yesterday" from his third
trip with a party of siv aides and de-
parted for the VEast jter making
known his discovery, in'the hope of
equipping a party to make more ex-
tensive examination of the district.
"Evef'y one knows," Mr. Ferguson
said, "that copper was mined on Isle
Royale many years ago on land now
covered with nine trees. The island is
covered with traces of these mines
and yet almost nothing has been done
to explore the workings.
"No one has found any of the re-
mains of the old miners, although
there.are many stories of finding tem-
pered copper weapons. I have found
several stone hammers, each sup-
plied with thongs, and have been in-
terested for the last three years in
establishing reports that a town ex-
isted on the south of the island.
"A writer named Gilman was au-
thority for this report 50 years ago,
but his description and location were
so vague that it was impQssible for
anyone to make anything out of
them."
Mr. Ferguson made his first trip in
the region. at the outlet of Siskiwitt
Lake which he said he thought tal-
lied with Gilman's data, but there was
no trace of a town. Last year he
found a waterfall which, he thought,
was the one mentioned in Gilman's
report. Because of the lateness of the
season, however, he was unable to
finish his work. On his third trip he
was rewarded by finding what he con-
siders unmistakable traces of a town
between Hay Bay and the waterfall
on the south side of Isle Royle."

INITlIA:TSTE OF CHAFEWS
' OWON SALE OCTOBER 1'W
Initial issue of Chimes, the campus
opinion 'Aagazine, will be placed on
sale alioiit Oct. 10, according to a
statemnhtniade yesterday by Edward
C. Mc(6bb2,:'23, 'managing editor.
The first number will be dedicated
to the class of 1926, in that it will be
known as the "Freshman Number."
Advice rund comment on the yearlings
will preloininate. One of the leading
articles will Ibe contributed by Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton.

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Lose something? A classified
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The tickets will be distributed by
e lottery system. As the seats in
e theater are all numbered, a com-
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g numbers will be drawn by lottery,
e first ten coupons drawn entitling
e holders of those seats to the, tick-
. Vernon F. llillery, '23, president
the Student council, will do the
a1Aing
rhe plane flown by Captain Carr is
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ates governmient. It is 'especially
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The winners of the ten tickets to
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ENERGINE

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THUR SDAY ct. h
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Coming to Ann Arbor with Original Cast and Production after an
entire season in New York and Long Runs in Chicago, Boston and
Philadelphia.
No other Theatrical Offering in our time has received the same meas-
nre of commendation from America's Leading Critics.
Kenneth Mac~owan said in The N .Y. Globe: "The moment when

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CLEANING'

We repair, reline and repleat all
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SWISSILIZED GARMENTS
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11

.- . -- - I

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