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September 28, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-09-28

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TH E MICHIGAN DAILY

At'
- V.,
.4',

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY OFFERS

I

IN HILL AUDITORIUM

,

FORTYFOURTH ANNUAL

FOURTH ANNUAL

Choral Union Series,
IU

Extra Concert Series

SIX CONCERTS

FIVE CONCERTS

October 24-MISCHA ELMAN, Vio-
linist.cTheChoral Union Scri s will be opened ,
by one of-the world's most distinguished violinists,
who, since his last American tour two years ago, has
duplicated his world wide sccess by triumphal,
tours through the leading music centers of Great
Britain and the continent. In spite of the many
new virtuosos who have been appearing in recent
years Mischa Elman still maintains his leadership
among them all.
November 10 -MARY GARDEN,
Soprano. Mary Garden, the world renownede
operatic star, opera directress and singer of songs,
has never befor- been heard in Ann Arbor. On
this occasion she will be assisted by Gutia Casini,
'Cellist, and Isaac VanGrove, Pianist, a combina-
tion which is bound to provide an evening's enter- - A--
tainment which will be memorable in every way.
She is recognized throughout the United States as
"Our Mary" and is unanimoisly accused of possessing "voice, brains, and personality."
January 8-IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI. When Mr. Paderewski last
appeared in Ann Arbor just before he began his meteoric career as a statesman in the strug-
gles of his native Poland he stated that Hill Auditorium was the finest music hall in the world.
~ The memory of his last Ann Arbor .concert had much to do in influencing him and his New
York manager in including Ann Arbor among the limited number of music centers which he
will visit this season. For -years he has been the standard by which great pianists are
measured and today he still occupies a position at the pinnacle. Those who have heard
him in private recital in his California studio state that the muscial recess which his duties as
stateman necessitated has only; added greater musicianship to his artistry.
January 24-IMPRESARIO OPERA COMPANY. For the first time
real opera will be heard in Ann Arbor when Mozart's Impresario will be presented under
the general direction of Williarp Wade Hinshaw. Elaborate special staging with the most
[ attractive settings will be constructed in Hill Auditorium for the occasion while the partici-
pants will appear in costumes and gowns which have been personally supervised by Mr.
Hindshaw. Percy Hemus, a celebrated American baritone, will take the leading role. He
will be supported by an all American cast as follows: Francis Tyler, Thomas McGrana-
han, Regina Vicarino, Hazel Huntington and Gladys Craven.
February 1 3-UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHORUS. This organization
is probably the most famous assembly of choral singers which has ever been on tour. For
three years the organization under the directorship of Alexander Koshetz, has toured Eu-
rope under governmental subsidy. Through the persistent and effective efforts of the
distinguished impresario, Max Rabinoff, the Chorus was induced to come to this country for
a limited number of concerts. The organization is known as a "human symphony orchestra."
In addition to unaccompanied choral selections, operatic airs will be included by Mlle. Oda
Slobodskaja, of the Petrograd Opera, and Mine. Nina Koschetz, of the Moscow Opera,
who made a sensational debut in New York last year. All of the 40 participants, as
well as the soloists, will appear in costume
March 9-GUY MAIER and LEE PATTISON. These two American pian-
ists have created a unique position in the world of art. For several years they centered their
efforts entirely in the performance of programs for two pianos, a field which they have
*( made distinctly their own. So successful hav e they been that they are able to fill only a
limited number of the engagements offered them. Mr. Maier is an artist of fiery tempera-
ment and dash, while Mr. Pattison is more conservative. Together their performances so
merge their individualities that they play almost as one. "They speak with one personality
and that a strong one." ...,E ,_ _ ~j,.. , .

Four Concerts by the
DETROIT SYM PHONY ORCH ESTR A

WITH EMINENT SOLOISTS and
ONE COMPLETE PIANO RECITAL

October 30-MR. GABRIL-
OWITSCH and his excellent band
of performers will be assisted by Ina
Bourskaya, the celebrated Russian
coloratura, whose record is a most en-
viable one. Sh-e will appear with Mr.
Gabrilowitsch in Detroit as well as in
Ann Arbor, shortly after which she
will divide her time between engage-
ments with the Metropolitan Opera
Company and Chicago Opera Associa-
tion, being the only artist who is a
regular member of both of these great
institutions.
November 20-On this occasion
MR. VICTOR KOLAR will
conduct the Qrhcestra in a popular
program which should have a wide
appeal not only to music lovers, in
general but to that great class of art
lovers who desire to -be entertained as
well as educated. A melodious pro-
gram of sparkling numbers will be
provided. Raoul Vidas, the distin-
guished French violinist, who was
prevented from appearing in .Ann
as soloist.

GABRIIJOWITSCI{

Arbor last season on account of illness will appear

December 4-MR. CORTOT has been referred to by distinguished authorities
as a second Paderewski. He plays with imagination and fire and can thunder like a
Titan and then a moment later can glide over the same keys with a swan-like grace.
Brilliancy, force and strength are qualities which supplement his fine artistic equipment.
England, Spain and the other countries of Europe have been electrified by him.
January 15-THE DETROIT SYMPHONY ORWHESTRA under
VICTOR KOLAR will offer a second popular program at this time when tuneful,
melodious orchestral selections will be provided. KATHRYN MEISLE, the dis-
tinguished contralto who made so fine an impression at the children's concert at the last
May Festival, will appear as soloist and will offer several brilliant ,attractive vocal selec-
tions.
February 19-THE EXTRA CONCERT SERIES will be.brought to a
close with MR. GABRILOWITSCH again wielding the baton in a symphony
program which will present as soloist, MR. MAURICE DUMESNIL, the cel-
ebrated French pianist, who has never before been heard in Ann Arbor. Mr..Dumesnil
has had a spectacular career not only in France but throughout Great Britain and the con-
tinent and has appeared with practically every great European conductor. He has also
triumphed in South Arnerical where he gave 158 recitals and also attained popularity as
a conductor. His forthcoming American tour will undoubtedly add similar laurels to
those already attained elsewhere.

1JU

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DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

'y'

UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHORUS

COURSE TICKETS (Choral Union Series) $4.50, $5.00, $5.50 $6.00; Patrons'
t7 n MAT TFRSRS PI T I PD IN A DVANCE TN ORDFR O RFCE PT.

Tickets (First choice) f COURSE TICKETS (Extra Concert Series) $2.00, $3.00, $4.00 $5.00. MAIL ORDERS FILL
PUBL IC SALF OF I TN ADVANCF T N RDFPR 01 7R F.CTT IPI iT C'SAT FW PIrAT%1 ATXNT' r TC'TVr- O

I

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