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November 09, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Yr~'/ 6:L ur7,'L.nuO iofltr111rvv11

W11 !4zUi S&J hI4t
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVER$ITY OF MICHIGAN(
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for ;republication of all
news dispatches -credited- to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
En ered2 at the >ostoffice attAnn Arbor,;
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offlces .Ann Arhor Press Building, May-
hard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, 960.
Commpunications not to exceed 300 words
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print,but as an evidence of faith,'
and lotices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
let at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed conimnicacions will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer enclcses postage. The Daily
dams not necessarily elorse the sentiments
expressed -in the communications,
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-N'
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION 1. STAHL
Assistant City d - .Mari m Km
Editorial Board Ch . . R. Meis
Night ILditor: -
Ralph fRyersTai-f~~
J. P. Dawson, Jr Ji.. Mack-.
L. . lI e'hdorf er , C. oMriarty.
H-. A. Donahue
Sports Editor........ .. ..P H. McPiice
Sunday Magazine Editor.....Delbert Clark
Women's iditor..... ..... arion Kch
fiumor Editor ....... ..-.. 6nald Conoy
Conference Editor ...1...,1. B. Grunry
Pictorial Editor ......,. . Robert Tatr.
,01usic Editor . .......... ... . H.Ailes
Assistants

up the offices with checks made out
smaller than a certain nominal sum.
But ten dollars is too high a place
to draw the line, considering that cer-
tain of the down town banks make no
such limitations at all regarding their
accounts. As for the fifty cent month-
ly penalty, the circumstances warrant
no assessment of the kind.
Students need the facilities provid-'
ed' by the banks, and perhaps these
establishments realize -this fact only
too well. It is about tim, however,
that the banks realize the undeniable
fact that they need the students, and
that if they do not derive their income
from the students directly, at least
they do so indirectly. The banks owe
no less of an obligation to their stu-
dent patrons than does any other busi-
ness concern in the vicinity of the
campus.

I

OASTED ROLL
WHY IS THE
'ENSIAN THER-
MOMETER SO
LONG?
LARGELY VEGETARIAN
As the careful cactus cackles,
So a roseleaf in its flight
Turns to leap adown the staircase
And runs with all its might.

W7

I,

EDITORIAL COMMENT
W SUGAR!

ili-

LAST EDITION 0'r

Lima beans are fully conscious
Of the vengeance they can wreak
When with deep and direful mean-
ing
The humble leek they seek.
* * *
LITTLE DRA1MAS IN OUR MIDST

Misted Hope
A JOB FOR THE STATE POLICE ACT I-The Oni
Perhaps nothing is more aggravat- reading room, at h
ing to both pedestrians and drivers of past any afterno
vehicles than a traffic jam and the Sofas full of bun
consequent confusion of inadequately larvae, armchairs
managed traffic. During the Michi- fested with armch
gan-Illinois football game traffic con- , buzzards, etc., infes
ditions in Ann Arbor were far from with etc's. All the m
what might have bden desired. Boy azines occupied."
Scouts of the city were summoned to E n t er Armand,
assist in directing traffic, and al- quest of "Life". Although a junior
though they served remarkably well in trade he fondly hopes to find it
keeping the streets clear, they were rak. Ie does not.
not experienced enough or physically Arm i t {rising on hind legs a
equal to the task of properly directing isniffingi ii): Lemme see, that lo
they hundreds of machines which de- like "Life" over there. (dives for ma
scended upon the city. It is commend azine on radiator--it is the "Coun
able that under these handicaps they Gentleman") Danimit, my accurs
were able to perform as well as they. luck! (knocks over ash tray.)
did. Buzzard: Wot t'ell?
on the day of the Wisconsin game . Armand: 'Scuse please. (sees "Li
there will no doubt be even more mo-, in the offing engaged with hulking s
torists in Ann Arbor than were pres- footer) AH! (stalks six-footer silen
ent during the Illinois contest. / and parks watchfully by) I will aw
The Daily heartily agrees with the my chanct! (he awaits.)
Grand Rapids Press in its recent Enter Theodore, a friend of
statement that the state police should mand.
be sent here on that occasion. With Theodore: Hello old soak, how
their assistance traffic could be well they hittin'?
handled, and time, energy, and the Armand: Not so worse. H'wa
enervating confusion of hundreds of yah? (during this exchange of bro
people could be saved. This is an erly love the six-footer lays do
opportunity for the state police to be "Life" and it is lapped up by;
of genuine service to the city and the Oriental in search of the High
state. Learning)

ion
alf.
on.
nge
in-
air
ted
Lag-
in
by,
on
and
oks
try
sed
fe"
six-
tly
vait
Ar-
v'er
,are
th-
wn
an
her

(Harvard Crimson)
The descendants of Shakespeare's
"Two Gentlemen of Verona" have lost
none of their gentility. What is more,
they have organized a crusade against
he use of profanity in the city and re-
port a remarkable success attending
their efforts. The committee declares
that by actual statistics 75 per cent of
the bad language which was once
heard has now been abolished, and al-
though the prospects for a complete
purification seem small the reformers
hope to succeed eventually. When
Verona has been purged, their efforts
will be extended to other cities and bit
by bit they hope to see the movement
spread over the face of the civilized
world.
Such herpics should not pass unno-
ticed. Since neither the Y. M. C. A.
nor the W. C. T. U. have volunteered
assistance, a movement may be set on
'oot to form a new College association.i
ill sober-minded Harvard men will)
welcome this possibility. The organi-
zation could be named, not the "H. M.
C. A.", but, more appropriately, the
"H. E. L. L." These initials stand for
the "Harvard Emasculated Language'
League". The very title of the move-
ment would insure its success, for who
could resist raising H. E. L. L. funds?
The aim of the organization will be
to stamp out profanity, whether spok-
en or written. The use of such terms
as 'damn" or "devil", will be censid- I
:red a crime Of the same degree as
bootlegging, and punished accordingly.
All literature*of the past will be care-
fully expurgated, that the rising gen-
eration may be free from the danger
of using strong language; for the in-
fluence of the' classics upon the youth'
of the present is profound. The organi-
zation will not be disbanded until
swearing, like the use of intoxicating
liquo'rs, is stamped out. "Hell", as
Samuel Johnson once remarked, "is
paved with good intentions".
A JURY OF PEERS
(The Tech)
When the Oxford debating team re-
turns to England, it may leave in the'
United States greater friendliness to-I
ward' its country. If the sole purpose
of Oxford is to promote good will be
tween the nations, its work probably
will not have been in vain. However,
since decisions in the debates with our I
universities were rendered, not by
trained judges, but by the vote of each

ti "
0

AT aa"":

BOTH ST01RES

MICHIGAPi

i

DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard T'ime)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-.
6:oo a.M, 7:oo a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:o5
a.m. and hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m.,/and{
every two hours to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo am.
and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.,
i , :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only-1:4o
p.m., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m.,j
12:1o p.m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.mn., 12:47, 2:472,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at{
8:47jP.iM.{
192 NOVEMBER 1922
S- 3 T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29. 30
Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH
CLASS Cleaning and Reblocking
of hats at low prices for GOOD
WORK.
We also make and sell POP-
ULAR PRICE and NIGH
GRADE hats, FIT THEM TO
YOUR HEAD and save you a
dollar or more on a hat,
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops
at State Street)
NiORENCI-ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect October x8, 1922 -
Central Time (Slow Time)
D X X D
P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.
2:55 6:55 Lv. 'Morenci .Ar. 1:35 9:35
3:45 7:45 ... Adrian ... 12:45 8:45
4:15 8:15 ... Tecumseh ... 12:15 8:15
4:30 8:30 ... . Clinton .... 12:00 8: oo
5:15 9:15 .. Saline .. 11:15 715
5:45 9:45 Ar~nn ArborLv. 10:45 6:45
(Court House Square) A. M.
Dl-Daily. X-Daily except , Sundays
and~Holidays. Friday and Saturday special
bus for students leaves Adrian 1:45, leaves
Ann Arbor 4:45.
JAMES H. ELILIOTT, Proprietor
Phone 026-M Adrian, ]Mich.

PEOPLE JUDGE
OTHERS
in various ways, but nearly
everybody's opinion is more
or less influenced by the
character of the stationery
ised in correspondence. . As
you judge, $o will you be
judged. Make sure your pa-
per, cards, envelopes, etc.,
are correct as to form, size,
etc., by procuring tihem here,
,.. 'the home of stationery of
. class.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADjE
The Tyfewriter and Stationery Store
ORDERS FOR YOUR -NAME ENGRAVED ON CHRISTMAS CARDS
SHOULD BE PLACED NOW-1

0 G

00OK

v

t _,,.

i

111. H. Pryor
Maurice Berman
R. A.. Billington
W. B. Butler
Hl.. C. Clark
A. B. Connable
Evelyn J. Coughlin
Eugene Carmichael
Bedpadette Cote
Wallace F. E-lliiott
S)e. Fiske
Miaxwell Fead

rJohn (,airlineoiisc'
Isabel 1Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
T. G .McShane
W. B. Rafferty
'W.[1. Stoneman
Virginia Tryoni
7~ M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Dickman
Joseph Epstein
J. W. Ruwitch
.J. A. Bacon!

'USINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
.BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising .......... ..John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising ... ......Edward V. Conlin
Advertising............Walter K. Scherer
Accounts...............Laurence H. FaVrot'
Circulation...............David J. M. Park
Publication.... ...L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

ownsende .Wolfe
:ennethi Seick
eorge Rockwood
erry M. Hayden
;ugene L. Dunne
V'm. Graulich, Jr.
ohn C. Haskin
arvey E. Reed
L. Putnam
D. Armantrout
. W. Cooper
tallace Flower
dw. B. Riedle-
farold lT. Hale~

Alf -td M. White -
-Wn. D. Roesser
Allan S2 Morton
James A. Dryer 4
Wrn. H. Good
Clyde L. Hagerman
A. Hartwell, Jr.
J.Blumenthal"
Howa-rd Hayden .
W. K. Kidder
H-enry Freud
Herbert P Bostwick.
L. Pierce-

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1922
Night Editor-JOHN DAWSON, JR.
ViIY STAND THE BANKS APART?
Ann Arbor proper is the possessor
f four banks. Whether or not Annj
.rbor could support that number of
nancial institutions were it not for
li presence of the University here,
a matter which might call forth
>me arg unent. Two of these banks,
owever, conduct branch' establish,
teni.s in the vicinity of the University
nmpu, whose dependence upon the
resente of the University for exist-
tce cannot be doubted.
Nlerc1,ants and storekeepers in the,
Cinty of the campus, who supply
.ludents with their material demands,.
illingly admit their obligation to the
Nde"t body for the income which
s anemba" bring to them, and in most
tses even inters. themselves in. the
lriou3 ativh i'i' the students. They
ten Inc uvcnignpe themselves to ob-
e ther patrons, andl mke every
asonablo effort t accommodate
em;
Tile campus banks evidently fail to
alize any such obligation. Contrary
the general custom in such estab-
tbments. one of them demands that
checks under ten, dollars be drawn
om so-called transient accounts, and
e other charges a fee of fifty cents
,ch month for such accounts which
op below fifty dollars. These methods
e in themselves perhaps of little mo-
ent, but there is a principle in-
lved which should not be over-

SCHOLARSHIP RIVALRY
As if in consideration of President
Burton's recent statement to Grand
Rapids alumni that students tend to
belittle the merits of scholarship, the
inter-fraternity conference accepted
from the alumni of a campus organiza-
tion Tuesday night the gift of what is
to be known as the Cecil Lambert Me-
morial Cup, to be awarded each year
to the fraternity having the highest
average in scholarship.
While the fraternities at the pres-
ent time are listed each semester ac-
cording to their respective scholar-
ship averages, the cup will afford some
more tangible object of rivalry in
studies, just as does the trophy in ath-
letics and bther student activities. The
Lambent cup will be awarded for a
certain number of years, at the end
of which time the fraternity having
held it mast often will come into its
permanent possession.
1 The gradual inculcation of a feeling
' of rivalry in scholarship as well as
in the other fields of student enter-
prise, will do much towards eliminat-
ing the tendency to regard -study as
beneath the dignity of the majority of
University members.

Armand (discovering his loss) Oh
coise it!
ACT II--Armand still watching the
Oriental whoris solemnly absorbing
foreign humor. ;He is about to lay
it down. Armand gathers himself to
spring. The Oriental does lay it down.
Armand springs.
Armand: Wurra! (clutching the
precious periodical he leaps to a sofa
and opens the oilcloth cover in which
it is preserved--it is last week's with
three pages missing!)
Armand:,hOlordolordolord! ! (he is
rushed to the new Health service.)
SLOW CURTAIN
- All Wrong, LEFT All Wrong!
No, Dear RIGHT
I have not deserted you
For CENTER
But the reason for my silence
Is this:

i
S
F
G
E
t

I wore out the ribbon
On my typewriter
And I've been saving
To buy me a new one
So I could write
To you

my pennies

JAZZ,. EXPORTATIONS
English musicians, that is those
who cater more to the popular taste,
are finding it almost impossible to
cope with the preference for Ameri-
can jazz bands and orchestras. They
have gone so far as to consider boy-
cotting the hotels and dance halls that
employ Yankee talent to satisfy this'
unprecedented craving on the part of
ile English for foreign music. The
boycott is usually quite an effective
weapon, but in this case, it seems as
tuough its success wuld be extremely
doubtful. It appears that the musi-
cians are the oitly ones who object
to this invasion; and as they are ac-
customed to do the piping while oth-
er folks dance it can make no differ.
ence in the attendance at the halls if
musicians unions do decide to boy-
cott. Popular sentiment is with the
Yanks.
Obviously, the only remedy the
English can employ to combat the
nterlopers is to learn their style of
playing from them. In so doing, they
would of course admit that they had
been beaten in a fair fight, but they
would also show that they are neither
too stubborn nor too ignorant to copy
their successful rivals. Of course, the
jobless pipers could seek their liveli-
hoods in other fields, but that would
be such an inconvenience. Live and.
learn is very a propos in this case.
Once outclassed need not be always
outclhsed.

LEFT.
Between the strife of Left and Right
Our colyum is a perfect fright.
The row has Centered in a theft-
Oh whisper it!-of Right from Left!
And EES, you're right on Top-
Of Monday's col.
Your stuff
's not pop-
-ilar enough.
* * *
COMMUNICATION
Our Own Wantads: "LOST-$1.45.
Finder return to Harry and receive
reward." Does Harry tote. Diogens'{
lantern, or is he merely a reporterI
with fifty dollars reward for the "po-
litest person?"
And Our Own Headline announces
"TAFFY WILL FILL KIDDIES'
3TOCKINGS." Must be a feeture

Your Overcoat-If it 's Tailored
By Kahn
you know it's right.
ASK THE MAN WHO WEARS ONE

audience, little more will have been ac-
complished.
International athletic meots are nt
judged by the spectator. Yet, it is!
less difficult to determine the result
of a race or jump than to pick the bet-
ter -team in a debate. In fact, in a
debate on the League of Nations, with
teams representing England and the
United States, the relative merits of
the opponents will have.little effect on
any decision given by an audience.
Not a small proportion of the listen-
ers will feel that duty directs them to
vote for what they want, not for the
team which may have been the better.
There will always be those in the aud-
ience who will want to see "our boys"
win and relative merits will effect
them little. Another group will in-
evitably pick "those fine boys who
came all the way from England" to be
the winners. As a result the decisions
are not even an accurate gauge of
opinon in the United States on the
League of Nations.
R is to be hoped that trained judges
will not be supplanted by impression-
able audiences in determining the re-
sults of the intercollegiate discussion.
If, like jurymen, audiences were un-
prejudiced, and were possessed of a
sense of responsibility the value of
their decisions would be greater, but
even jurymen under oath, as they are,
are seldom reliable, so that the opinion
of the average audience is little more
than worthless.
I NON-ATITETn ETLITGIBI IVL

Priced
$42 to $85

ONE DOLLAR
OR MORE
FOR YOUR OLD PEN
STANDARD MAKE
In Exchange For a
RIDER MASTERP EN
And your pen troubles are ovei
RIDER'S PEN C HOP

i

Domestic and Imported Oliercoatings for your
selection. "
Tin ker &ompany
342 S. STATE ST. at WILLIAM ST.

6.

A4 luncheon that.start's with
cdepor tie an din
c lu des e ve'r yti n gy o '

Lunch todayof

3 2 * State

-story. Holes;
Moreover,

are bad enough, but taf-
we hope you had Gump-

.I

tion enough

to vote for Andy.
ICHABOD.
* * *

The campus banks state that no
rofit is made on student accounts. If
ot, there remains only one excuse
r their existence in the present loca-
ons. Their business must be derived
-em the merchants in the vicinity of
e campus, and from the fraternities
nd organizations of the University.
as it ever been considered .by the
inks that the students support the
.e.rhants and therefore indlrectly
'ovide them also with the means of
ipport? Do the students not- make
p the fraternities and organizations
hose accounts may be of profit to the
inks? These facts were not made
ublic in connection with the install-
g of unusual rules concerning tran-

Purely Personal
A slinky lady from the East
Passed through the other day.
For Our Great Goof's sake
We can be most glad
Co-eds don't dress that way.
- The Boys.
* * *
'NOTIE R COMMUNICATION
DEAR CAL: How come the sar-
castic and insinuating poem by RED
n yesterday'scolyum? It's 'a lie, as

(The Pennsylvanian)
The importance of eligibility rules
in non-athletic activities is not to be
denied, for it would be patently un-
fair to permit competitors in these
fields of campus activity to be free
from regulation while tieir fellow stu-
dents in athletics are barred from play
when they fall below a definite schol-
astic standard. But, at the same time,
it seems scarcely logical that students
in non-athletic activities should be sub-
jected to much more rigid restrictions
than are the candidates for athletic
teams. Yet this very condition exists
on the campus today.
No athlete is eligible when he is not

I
< , .

TONIG HT

TONICHT

THE CLOSING NIGHT OF

The Detroit congressional election
seems to have turned into an inter-
collegiate match. Latest rumors have
it that the contest between Robert
Clancy of Michigan and a Harvard
candidate was decided largely by they
alumni of those respective universities.

only the other night he cleaned me in good standing in eighty per cent
out-clean-leaving even no cash for of his work. But no student may par-
breakfast, Revengefully, ticipate in non-athletic activities who
RED'S ROOMMATE. is below passing in more than one
* * ' * and one-half units of work. The dis-
Oh, Girruls! crepancy is evident, and as it stands
VIOLET WILL PLAY TWO GAMES it constitutes discrimination against
WITH MAROON the members of publication boards,
- N. Y. U. Daily News. musical clubs, holders of manager-
* * ships and class offices, and partici-
Nebraska is planning a stadium. pants in all the varied forms of non,
* * 1 athletic acnti-vit-.

SEVEN GRAND PRIZES TO BE AWARDED TONIGHT

ST UDENTSINVITED

T ELSIFOR'S GARAGE
117 NOlRTHI FRAT qTI FT

I

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