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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-05

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AGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY s

>NDAY, NOVEM13ER 5, 1922

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Y'ubih- ev y mirning except Monday
during the uiversity rear 1y the Board i)
C.rtrol of Student Putlica ions.
Memnbr of W:steru Conkrence Editorial
Association.
The Asocil Ph a : xch ively. en-
nes ipac es ceoid toi t ~
wise ctruditd ,i i ti pale~r and the loca
news published th iriu.
Enered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor.
Michigan, as second classm ratter.
subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones :t.ditorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, q6o.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signed, tire signature: not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith.
and jiotices of events will be published ini
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
kft "t or mailed to The Daily office. Un
signed comriunications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returneid
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does rot° necessarily -endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.A
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telaphoness 2414 aid 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
News Editor................Paul Watzel
City Editor ...............James B. Young
Assistant City Editor.........Marion Kerr
lditorial .Board Chairman ......E. R. Meiss
Ni+ Eitors-.
Ralph Byers Harry THoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L.. J. JIershdorf.r R. C. Moriarty
11. A. DonahueH
Sports Editor.............. . MPike
Sunday Magazine Editor.......Delbert Clark
Women's Editor ..............Marion Koci-
Humor Editor ................Donald Coney
Conference Editor...........H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor.............. Robert Tarr
Music Editor ............ ...H. Ailey
Assistants

A:
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M. T1. Pryor . John Garlnahouse
Dorothy Bennetts Isabel Fisher
Maurice Reiman Winona A. Hibbard
R. A. Billington Samuel Moorie
W. 1. Butler T. G. 1MeShane
H. C. Clark W.. B. Rafferty.
A.- B. Cornable W. H. Stoneman
Eugene Carmichael P. M. Wagnerks
bei nadette Cote A. P. Webbink
Wl~lace F. Elliott franklin Dickman
;. Fiske Joseph Epstein
Maxw4l Fead I. W. Ruwitch
J. A. Bacon~
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advgrtigin.. ........John J. Hamel, Jr.
ertisig........ Edward F. Conhi
Advertiin I.... .Walter K. Scherer
accounts ...............Laurence H,.. avroi
ircue in... ....David J. M. Park.
i'ublcatin-............L. Beaumont Park
Assistants

TIME TO GET BUSY
Senior pictures for the Michiganen-
sian are now due and must be turned
in as soon as possible. This announce-
ment contains nothing startlingly new.
Tt has been reiterated every year doz-
Ans of times, and yet too often goes
Lnheeded. Seniors who appreciate the
added convenience to themselves of
having their pictures taken early will
Sot delay in the manner some of them'
have done in the past and many are
loing at present.
There are over 2,000 seniors who
:oust have pictures taken between now,
<Lnd the middle of December. The ca-
-acity of any photographic studio is,
;imited in the number of sittings that
:an be handled in one day. When so,
many seniors delay until the last mo-
ment to obtain appointments, conges-
tion and dissatisfaction are the results.
If the number were distributed more
evenly over the available time, pic-,
tures would be better and everyone
would be less crowded for time.
Seniors must get busy immediately,
f no one is to be disappointed because
if inability to get an appointment later
in in the month. In addition to the
added convenience to themselves, the
work of the 'Ensian staff is materially
aided by getting the pictures in at a
seasonable date.
PUNISHMENT PUBLICITY
Disposed of with a speed that set a
record for the state of Michigan a re-
cent kidnapper was sentenced to a
forty year prison term within forty-
eight hours after the commission of
the crime. N'ewspapers reported the
punishment of the crime the day fol-
owing the announcement of the ap-
prehending, of the criminal, while the
criminal offense was still fresh in
the minds of readers. Such publicity
of criminal acts is to be commended
in the example shown of the severity
of punishment dealt criminals and the
potent warning to the criminally in-
clined.
If newspapers would publish the
punishment of the crime in as con-
.picuous a place as the announcement
of the same, the existence in this
;ountry of "yellow sheets" and sensa-
tionally inclined publications would
be a fact to be commended rather than
condoned. Severe sentences are im-
posed upon criminals not through any
Vindictive spirit of revenge, but-as an
example to potential criminals. If
:'ewspapers devoted their sensational
4forts to publishing the punishment of
crimes as religiously as they adve'rtise
heir perpetration, a very needed place
would be filled in the -country's efforts
toward rime suppression.
STADIUM FEVER
An epidemic of what may well be
ermed "stadium fever" has taken pos-
session of a number of the larger uni-
versities of the middle west. It is the
desire of each univerity to own a sta-
dium which not only has an enormous
:eating capacity but is a marvel in
concrete, an imposing structure which
will call forth gasps of admiration
'rom everyone.
It causes -no end ,of wonderment
,hen one views a stadium such as the
me at Columbus, that such a titanic
structure should be built to be used
ust half a dozen times each year. Sel-
lom indeed does an institution erect a
huilding costing over a million dollars
Anless it is to be used almost con-
stantly.
Yet it cannot be doubted that a sta-

Cappon exploding through the line.
Kipke going through the line like ak
clenched fist.
Yell leaders lead a phantom yell.
The prime object of football crowds is
to see the game-
Not to be yelled.
HALF-33-0
Ah, the bands.
That MAC drill team that plays
music.
Applause-Michigan band achieves an
Second half.
MAC begins to tear 'em off.
Neisch turns the game around.
Lots of basketball.
A little baseball.
Track! The high hurdles.
Last quarter.
Steg shines.
Ray! fight on the side lines!
Another towuchdown.
The shades of night descend.
GAME!
63-0. * * *
DE BOID COMES A FOOTBALL
STORY
Be Boid was offishul reporter fur
de colum yestiday He sure did it rite

OASTED ROLL
MICHIGAN PLAYED
A PASSING 6001)
GAMEa
We Shear a Sheep
A large green-and-yellow-maize-and-
blue crowd.
Sprinkled with mums at four bits a
throw.
Flutter of pink tickets.
"Program!"
"Gad, they're givin' 'em away!"
"Put it on take it off put it on take
it off-"
The fat man said we couldn't sit there
because MAC was sitting there.
Well, who wants to sit there?
The MAC Band.
Hurray!
Our Own Band!
Flags and banners!
The terpsichorean cheer leaders.
Teeing up the pigskin.
Do they use a new ball every time?
The cranes in the new field house
peering over the south stand like
inquisitive prehistoric monsters.
Michigan kicks!
THE SHEEP WE SHEARED

.oP,^ 1

EDITORIAL COMMENT
TEACHERS WHO CAN ALSO DO
(New York Herald)
John Stephen Worley, a New York
consulting engineer who has been
highly successful in his profession,
gives up his practice to become pro-
fessor of transportation and railroad
engineering at the University of Michi-
gan, where he will receive a salary of
less than $5,000 a year. He does this
because he believes he can render a
greater service by training young men
in his profession than he can by con-
tinuing his practice in New York.
Mr. Worley's case is interesting. He
is still a young man, 46, who might
count upon at least twenty-five more
years in the active pursuit of his call-
ing. Most professional men do not
strike their full stride until they have
reached Mr. Worlefs age. He could I
look forward confidently to greater
professional recognition and increased
material rewards.
But he has seen something bigger
than either of those things, and he has
grasped it. Mr. Worley must feel the
impulsion to teach or he would not
give up what he does. That means he
will carry into his teaching the enthu-
siasm without which teaching is a
dead thing. And teaching by a man
who knows what he is talking about
can get worthwhile results.
George Bernard Shaw said stinging-
ly: "Those who can, do; those who
can't, teach." That is far from fair.
Among teachers are many whose ca-
pacity for instruction i great, and
who would also be great performers.
It would be a fMie thing for profes-
sional education if more of those who
can would also teach.
Occasionally a medical school or a
law school or an engineering school
obtains the services of a man of par-
ticular ability in his profession who
is also gifted as a teacher. No mat-
ter how distinguished that man's serv-
ices may have been in the actual prac--
tice of his profession, society owes
him a greater debt for what he can
do as a teacher.
NOVEMBER
(Ohio State Lantern)
Election day, speeches and cigars of
the politicians as they make their
last-minute stand; Armistice Day, pa-
rades vividly recalling the scenes of
four and five years ago when the
khaki and the blue were everywhere;
crisp weather, the weekly gridiron
contests; Thanksgiving Day, the tra-
ditional turkey and cranberry sauce
-all of which reminds us that the
eleventh month of the year is here.
November to the college student
brings forth more memories than any
month save June, when the college
year is ended. Football games in
bright weather just before the winter
settles down, dances that mark the
opening of the year's festivities,
weather the like of which is never ap-
proached by other months, serve to
engrave the month on the memory of
the college student.
The student dreads the arrival of
December in a way, because the cold
winter days are certain to come with
the last month of the year, but he
hopes for, and usually gets, many
warm, hazy, summerlike days during
November.
And after a month crowded with the
thrills of football contests he can look
forward to the feast that is annually
prepared on the last Thursday of the
month. Yes, the college student wel-
comes the coming of November.
AVOIDING THE PURPOSE

(Cornell Daily Sun)

I

les in. If two of more stories are
published the author will probably re-
ceive an A in the course.
DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(4astern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-
6:oo a.m., 7:0o a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:05
a.m. and hourly to 9:o5 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)--9:47 a.m., and
every two hours to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7 :o0 a.mn.
and every two hours to 9:o p. in.,
" poop.m. To Ypsilanti oly-1:40
p.m., i :1s a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m.,
12:10 p.m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited at
8:47 p.m.

1922
S

5
12
119
26

NOVEMBER
RI T W T
1 2
6 7 8 9
13 14 15 16
20 21 22 23
27 238 29 :30

F
3
10
17
24

1'

LAST E
MICHIGAN

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH
CLASS Cleaning and Reblocking
of hats at low prices for GOOD
WORK.
We also make and sell POP-
ULAR PRICE and HIGH
GRADE hats, FIT THEM TO
YOUR HEAD and save you a
dollar or more on a hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.t. Stops
at State Street)

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-T' nwneind 1. IWolfe Alfred M. White
Kw-1 cireWm. D. Roesser.
George Rmckwood Allan ' Morton
Perry AI Hvdn James A. Dryer
ugene L. Dunne i Win. H, Good.
Wi. Graulich,J. Clyde L. Hagerman
John ask A.Hartwell, Jr.
J. Blu enhal -
C.. ai1wai'.d i vden
E. ). rininr~it XV.K. 1Kidder
- WC r- T-lenry Freud
X\ ail; !- l'-

W1ORENCI-ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect October x8, 1922
Central itrwe (Slow Time)
D X X D
P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.
2:55 6:55 Lv Morenci .Ai, 1:35 9:35
(Hotel)
3:45 7:45 .... Adrian ... 12:45 8:45
4:15 8:rs ... Tecumseh ... 12a:1 8:r5
F:30 8:30 ,... Clinton . ... 12:00 8:oo
5:15 9:15 .. Saline 11:.Ii15 7:15
5:45 9:45 Ar Atn ArborLv. 1o:45 6:45
(Court House Square) A. Ml.
D-Daily. X-Daily except Sundays
and Holidays. Friday and Saturday special
bus for students leaves Adrian r:45, leaves
Ann Arbor 4:45.
JAMES I. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
phone 926-M Adrian; Mich.

4
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SSN[ O5MBER 5. 1922
Night Editr-JULIAN ELLIS MACK
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN ART!"
Exultant cries have been raised dur-
ing the past-year or so to the effect
that at last the personnel of Michigan
has awakened to an appreciation o'
art, and williiigly grasps any oppor-
tunity to come in contact with things
cultural. All. this emanated from 9
truly commendable interest displayed
in the poet lecture series last year, and
in a few other branches of literary en-

J s

too. Ges as how it
woulduv bin a point a
minit but there wasn't
enuf minits left. Here's
de game touchdown by
touchdown Utz hides
behind ball score 7 to 0
Cappon Annette Keller-
mans over Aggie line

and Charley paddocks 29 yds score 14
to 0 Kipke gits jellis of Maulbetsch
and pole vaults 50 feet score 21 to 0
Kipke again score 28 to 0 Neisch in
left field juggles Aggie fly score 35 to
0 Goebel imitates Burbank by crossin
ball wid foot score 38 to 0 repeatsI
score 41 to 0 Steger gits ornery tears
round field like madbull in china shop
breaks Ma Lansings dishes score 47 to
0 Steger somsersaults and adds two,
handsprings for score 54 to 0
Steger friscoes on right foot ball
sails through air 50 yds score 57 toI
0 Knode paces Farmers for 19 ft score

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deavor. dium such as the one at Ohio is a 63 to 0 Timekeepers rush for waterj
Despite this hue and cry, however, source of pride to the student body of pail Michigan backfield out of wind
only four hundred students attended that University. And the stadiums of so ref calls game Coach Little orders
the exhibition of War Portraits recent- his type which will be erected in the ading machine for Wisconsin game.
ly conducted- by the Ann Arbor Art next few years should be proudly ex- DE JOISEY BOID.j
association in Memorial hall. Yet the hibited by collegians as a tribute to an * * *
ntangible thing called "college spir- Mr. Colgate and Mr. Williams Also
collection was, brought here at consid- it," of which Coach Yost made mention Spoke
erable expense solely for the benefit before the Ohio game. That it is great- "At the meeting of the Agricultural
of Michigan students and faculty mem- er than the spirit of professionalism Society last evening talks were given
bers. needs no further confirmation than the by Mr. T. A. Coleman and Mr. Per-
Beginning At 2 o'clock this after- fact that these immense stadiums are due.."
being erected and filled to capacity -- Purdue Exponent.
non in Memorial hall, what is proba- I'or the athletic contests held in them. * * *
bly the most valuable and extensive NUIT BLANCHE
collection of the paintings of any Evidently the former kaiser is still I dreamed of Right
modern artist will be presented to the as strong-willed as ever, even in re- The other night,
public by the Art association. The ar- gard to his second marriage. Accord- A dream that filled me
Ing to the associated press dispatch, Full of fright,
fist, Nicolas Constantinovich Roerich. his former wife, even "the late Em- I wasn't tight
is recognized as having attained the press Augusta" is opposed to the But such a sight,
high water mark in Russian painting match. No D. T. ever
up to the present time. His work- Brought to light.
oiy moderately impressionistic but It is understood that some photog-I
thoroughly original, does not carry the rapher has taken a picture of the aft- It wasn't she
-tepressing spirit so characteristic of ernoon crowd at Huston's, and hand- That frightened me,
the literature of his nation. On the ed it in to the Michiganensian labelled She was as sweet ....
contrary rich warmth of color imme- "Higher Education". As sweet can be,
diately engages the attention, and a But 'twixt we three
general optimism is expressed by the When betting and scalping have What I did see
paintings, still without becoming un- both been done away with, some bene- Was Left behind
Russian in character. This remarka, factor should start a movement In memory.
ble and inten'sely interesting collection against eating peanuts at games. CENTER.
of modern paintings has been obtained _* * *
for the benefit of the personnel of The Student council has announced SAY CALIGULA.: Didja ever notice
Michigan during the next three weeks. office hours from 10 to 12 every Satur- the way the wimmin of this beckonin'
Whether or not ,the efforts and ex- .day morning. Now is the chance for campus turns around every time
pense of the Art association in bring- students to air their grievances. someone whistles for the campus
ing this collection to Ann Arbor will dogs? SIDBEE.
have been worth while depends upon Was the "Farmer's Spotlight" ar- * * *

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Strictly speaking, a freshman is a
student who is spending his first year
at any college or university, and as
such is considered eligible to repre-
sent the freshman class in athletics or
other activities. At the same time, a
number of students are enrolled
every year, who have attended some
other college or university, for one or
even two terms, and yet are scholas-
tically freshmen. Usually they have
been subject to freshman rules at the
institution with which they first reg-
istered; when they come to Cornell
they often expect to tbe relieved of
these duties.
Any student who has been subject to
freshman rules for a full year at an-
other institution, cannot be technical-
ly bound to observe such regulations
over again. On the other hand, one
who is scholastically a freshman,
might better join in with the customs
and regulations that govern the class
with which he is to graduate. The
main purpose of freshman rules, es,
pecially the wearing of the grey cap,
is to provide a common bond that will
build up a class unity. If some indi-
viduals are allowed to stand aloof,
claiming exemption upon a technicali-
ty they would be defeating the very
purpose for which freshman rules ex-
ist.
STUDENT STORIES MAY BE

QQUALITY. ' QALITY
INI II R~~. -.__

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,gib

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