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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 02, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-11-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

HIRAN DAILY

. .. . .... ...

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.'
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatchescredited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
Entered3 at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176.M; Busi-
ness, 6o.
Communications not to exceed 3oo words
if signed, the signature not necessarilyato
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
left Lt or' mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed comrnunications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unlessthe writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the commnications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
]MARION B. STAHTL
News Editor..................Paul Watzel
city Editor .. ..........James 1.. Young
Assistant City Editor...........Marion Kerr
Editorial 'Board Chairman ......E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-
Ralph Byers Haizy Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr, J. E. Mack
L. J. Iershdorfer R. C. Moriarty
11. A. Donahue
Sports Editor. .........V. H. McPike
Sunday Magazine Editor.......Delbert Clark
Women's Editor..............Marion Koch
Humor Editgr ..............Donald Coney
Conference E'ditor........H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor ...... .....RobertrTarr
Music Editor .................r. H. Ailes
Assistants,

M. H. Pryor.
Dorothy Iennetts
Maurice Rerman
P. A. Billington
W. B. Butler
H. C. Clark
A. B. 'Connable
Evelyn J. Coughlin
Eugene Carmichael
Bernadette Cote
Wallace F. Elliott
T. P, Piske
Maxwell Fead

Tohn GarUnzhouse
Isabel Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
T. G. McShane
W. B. Rafferty
W. H. Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
P. M. Wagner,
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Dickman
Joseph Fpstein
J. W. Ruw itch
J. A. Bacon

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising...........John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising...............Edward F. Conlin
Advertising..............Walter K. Scherer
Accounts ....... ..Laurence H. Favrot
Circuldrion...............David J5. M.Park
Publication .............I. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

success in life. .The university of to-
day is not a thing apart. It is a well-
notched cog in the -system. College
is a section of educational growth,
and its interests lie with the interests
of the world in which it functions.
Neglecting this situation altogether,
too many students enter a university
with the idea of gaining an education
completely within the boundaries of its
campus. Although in their home com-
munities they may have been interest-
ed in some phase of national or inter-
national life, although they may have
been ardent newspaper readers each
evening, their four years at college
are marked by a decided disregard of
every problem which confronts nation
or world. They become lotus-eaters
in regard to outside affairs. They
study political science, and don't even
know who has been elected governor
of their home state. They absorb his-
tory, and fail to follow the makers of
history today. They study the past,
and totally disconnect themselves
from the more important present and
its bearing on the future. They sur-
round themselves with the walls of
university, and live in isolation for
four precious years.
To be sure, the student who thinks
matters over is practically enevr guilty
of this failure to keep in touch with
the world. But the fact remains that
all students do not ponder their choic-
es to any considerable extent, and too
many are inclined to take the easiest
way of complete forgetfulness of the
world outside during their stay in an
educational Utopia. What universities
need is not only students who digest
the contents of text boks, but readers
of newspapers, periodicals, and mod-
ern books which keep them well posted
in current events.
If university is to mean what it
should, we must keep in touch with
the world.
A GALLERY OF FAME
If the average Michigan student
were asked by an outsider, "Who are
the men, graduated from your Uni-
versity, who ,have attained the most
prominence in public life?" he would
be at a loss for an answer.
At present the student body reads
an occasional item in the "Daily" in
which reference is made to a celebrity
who was formerly a Michigan under-
graduate. He nlay hear a few isolated
references to such men as Edwin Den,
by in casual conversation. But very
few students really know who are the
prominent men of the vas Michigan
alumni body.
The proposed "Hall of Fame" which
is being planned by the Michigan
Union would tend to corect this re-
gretable situation. The portraits of
these men gathered in one particular
gallery will serve not only to beautify
and dignify the Union building, but
will also acquaint the student body
with then ames and appearances of the
distinguished men who have emerged
from the same halls of learning as
they. It is pointed out not untruth-
fully that such a collection of por-
traits would serve as an inspiration to
undergraduates and would tend to
make them more proud of their alma
mater.
QUICK-LUNCHES
Over thirty restaurants are to be
found within two blocks of the Michi-
gan campus, a large number of which
are the "quick lunch" variety, where
rolls and coffee are handed out, al-
most before the customer has seated
himself.
The popularity of the "quick lunch"
s typical of our willingness to fore-

go comfort and a more carefully pre-
pared meal in the interest of saving
a few minutes time and possibly a bit
of money. Visitors to our country,
have frequently remarked about ourl
haste in eating, while commenting up-
on the invariable American habit of1
speeding up everything. "Speed at any
price" seems to be the National
motto.
Meals served at lunch counters are
likely to be eaten hurriedly. A friend-
ly chat between courses or a smoke
after the meal are things practicallyI
unknown there.
At certain times in everyone's life a
quick meal is a necessity, and then
the lunch counter is a great conven-
ience. There are likewise times, when
almost everyone feels the pressure of
depressed finances, and then the small
saving that is effected by eating at a
lunch counter is highly appreciated.
But the custom of habitual hasty eat-
ing at the lunch counter, when there
is no occasion for a hurried meal, is
one which can do an incalculable
amount of harm to the digestive sys-I
tem and general good health.
Last year the flag-raising was onel
of the stock events of every footballI
game. This year neither the ceremonv

GOD ORNING

op

HAVE YOU USED l
PEAR'S SOAPT
WELL, NOW that the Directory is
coming out soon, we fancy a lot of
doubts are going to be cleared up re--
garding who she is and what frat he
belongs to. And wouldn't it be a
splendid convenience if a pictorial
supplement could be appended to the
Directory?

EDITORIAL COMMENT
CONTRE LE FRANCAIS
(Daily Maroon)
It is not, we have been told, very
consistent with editorial policy to be
too specific, too concrete. But here
goes.
Two books, "Le Voyage de Mon-
sieur Perrichon," a farce by Eugene
Labiche and Edouard Martin, and "La
Petite Fadette," a novel by Georges
Sand, constitute the principal ground
of complaint. We feel that these
works have lost their right to a place
in the courses of the Romance de-
partment. We ask Professor Coleman
(or whatever gods may be) to remove'

MICHIGAN

SONG

BOOK

r': AT

: -:

BOTH STORES

TO PRIAPUS
To Priapus, I sing;
He of the garden, king;
Let him reign o'er us;
Let him in Bithynia's shade
See that no ardour's fade
In frolic's chorus.
Let some sweet Oenore,
Who on Ida's slopes before,
With Paris dreamed;
Bring the god's blessings down,
Even Tithonous' crown,
From where it gleamed.
Each to his god repairs,
Offering his ardent prayers
For intercession;
My god they all obey,
All feel his thrall and sway,
And some, depression.
Therefore to him I sing,
He of the sowing, king,
And days of planting;
When Brimo comes to me,
May he be there to see
That's theres' no scanting.
SEXTUS.
* * *

Place your engraving and emboss-
ing stationery orders with 0. D. Mor-
rill, 17 Nickels Arcade, and save that
eleventh hour rush.--Adv.

INTELLIGENT AND INTERESTED1

I.

(lvi nrhtovctvode mnv h iv tn vvc
them.
The farce is offered in Romance 3.
It is a hodge-podge of outworn stage,
conventions. Its characters are not
interesting. The drill in French idiom!
it affords does not justify its use in
the department.
Assuming that ninety per cent of
elementary romance students are in-
terested just a bit in French litera-
ture, we contend that "La Petite Fa-
dette" is an insult. Georges Sand hasE
long ago been laid away on the shelf.
Modern Frenchmen, modern English-
men, modern Americans in pursuit of
good literature no longer take heed
of such style or such matter.
We object, but in less degree, to
Anatole France's "Le Livre de Mon
Ami." Many a French student exposed
to this dull affair has feared to ex-
plore the magnificence of one of the
greatest minds in the world, has left
unread "Penguin Island" and "The Re-j
volt of the Angels."
.It is not as if the Romance depart-
ment had no alternative. The history
of French literature is full of theI
names of subtle, mature writers whose
stuff, on a literary plane with that of
Conrad or Dostoievsky, would give
the undergraduate brain no more trou-j
ble in translation and far more gen-
uine pleasure in reading than the
puerilitis of "La Petite Fadette" orI
the poor jokes of "Le Voyage de Mon-
sieur Perrichon." R. P.

!' 1 t * 1! 1?*
NUFF SED REDIV
Hello, hello HELLO! 'W
with the line? Wires cro
Central, can't you giveL
connection? Hey, there,
line! Another astral sca
pose! The way these sp
is a caution! There, that's
hello Cal! That you? TI
SED, speaking from the h
Never did like ether, any
Smells like a hospital.
now all the references t
sleeping. Put 'em to'slee
say it does! What? The
course. Yessir, the minu
here, off they go-WHIFF
that! Been watching 'em
ever since I came. Nearl
first, but I rallied roue
while. Been wondering
Asked one of the guards
Said: 'who is that one stag
there? He'll be down in
Guard said: "Oh, he's fro
Said: "Who's that other on
and gray? He's gone doN
breath. Doesn't even wig

IVUS l
hatsamatter
ssed? Say,
us a better
get off the
ndal I sup-
irits gossip
s better. Oh,
his is NUFF
digher ether.
yway. Ugh!
Understand
o the dead
p? I should

DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-
6:oo a.m., 7:o a.m., 8 :oo a.m., 9:05-
a.m. and hourly to 9 :o5 p.mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)---9:47 a.m., and
every two Ihours to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7 :0o a.m.
and every two hours to 9 :o0 p.. ii.,
i :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only-1 :40
p.m., i1:15 a.ni.
To Saline--Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a.m.,
12:10 p.m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited at
8:47 p.m.
1922 OCTOBER 1922
S N T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH
CLASS Cleaning and Reblocking
of hats at low prices for GOOD
WORK.
We also make and sell POP-
ULAR PRICE and HIGH
GRADE hats, FIT THEM TO
YOUR HEAD) and save you a
dollar or more on a hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Wihere ID..R. Stops
at State Street)
MORENCI-ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect October x8, x9a2
Central Time (Slow Time)
D X X D
P.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.
2:55 6:5s Lv, orenci..Ar. 1:35 9:35
(Hotel)
3 :45 7:45 .... Adrian ..t. 12:45 8:45
4:15 8:=5 . . .Tecunmseh .. . x2:15 8:15
4:30 8 :30 ... . Clinton ...12 :oo 8 :oo
5:15 9:15 . Saline ... 11.15 7:15
5:45 9:45 Ar nn Arborbv. 10:45 6:45
(Court house Square) A. M.
D--Daily.'X - Daily except Sundays
and holidays. Friday and Saturday special
bus for student;, leaves Adrian 1:45, leaves
Ann Arbo: 4:45.
JAMES IT. ELLIOTT, Proprietor
Phone o26-M Adrian, Mich.

FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK

101-105 So. MAIN

330 So. STATE ST.

......

mmmmmwwwwm
..mmmmommumom

i

SU u

I

LAST EDITION OF

Your bank should be sound, accurate and
efficient. But that is not enough. Banking
service to be of the most use to you should
be also intelligent and interested.

That is what this bank tries to. be

Photographer to Michigan Students
Established 1887

The Law Department was opened October 8, 1859,
with C. J. Walker, James V. Campbell and M. Cooley
as faculty.

i

WE ARE BRITONS
(McGill Daily)

fownsend H. Wolfe
Kcnneth Seick
;corke Rockwood
erry M. Hayden
E~ugene L. Dunne
'vm. Graulich, Jr.
ohn C. TIaskin
1.Putnam
.D. Armantrout
. V. Cooper
Wallace Flower
B. Rielle
?arnl V . IHale

Alfred M. White
Win. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wnm. 11. Good
Clyde L. Hagernan
A, Martwell, Jr.
J,' B1lumenthal
Howard Uayden
W. K. Kidder
Tlenry Freud
Herbert P Bostwick
L. Pierce

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1922
Night Editor-JOHN DAWSON, JR.,
TIME TO CALL A HALT
The word epidemic has'a depressing
connotation. It suggests the "flu",
spiritualism, idealism, and all the kin-
dred "isms" which have assailed man
unmercifully in the last half century.
At present a new epidemic, local in
charwcte but nevertheless .unpleas-
ant, has begun to rage, and unless it is
curbed in its infancy promises to as-
sunmc exueedigly -obnoxious propor-
tions. The affliction is: one of which
those who trod the campus each day
cannot but be aware. It results from
the audacity of vendors or concerns
which make the diagonal walk their
sales rooms and a stamping ground
for the display of commercial wares.
If this is allowed to continue, the
future may well present a lamentable
picture to the incoming student. Men
with flat feet and fog-horn voices will
occupy all available space booming
bombastically each one his product'
Little stands and booths will be lined
up on either side of the diagonal
walk; and passersby will be eternally
harassed and nagged to buy, sub-
scribe, listen, look, or taste. The cam-
pus will have been converted into a
competitive battleground, revealing
commercial practices, to be sure, but
nevertheless undesirable in its aes-
thetic background.
The business districts of Ann Arbor
furnish definite places for the sale of
hairpins, toothpaste, and sheet music.
If commercial enterprises are not will-
ing to conmine their activities to that
area some means should be taken to
keep them from operating on the cam-
pus. A commercial imbroglio and a
university atmosphere cannot thrive
together on the same plot of ground.
The salesmen must stay away.

grunted: "That's
it doesn't affect
about that quite
answer?" Guard
look. Growled:
ANN ARBOR!"

Ohio." Sa
me. Be
a while.
gave me
"Huh! Y

! 1 1

NI
THE CHOICE

When I go to the picture
And ride the thrills each
I wish I had no fingernails
To bite and bite and bite.
In class I'm never troubled
And everything is nice.
There's not enough exciten
To stimulate the vice.
But sitting in a movie hou
With.-hero in a race
With villain for a lady'sl
It's quite another case.
And so my woeful habit
One of two things entail
It's either no more movies
Or no more fingernails
* * *
THE PILL 0]
STATE BUTS TWO
TRACKS OF LAN
FOR L
-Our 0
Ah, the Law club on wh(
* * *
DRIVE CAPTAINS
TO PLANt

ether, of Thousands of Canadians, among
te they get whom, unfortunately, are many uni-
F! just like versity graduates, annually leave the
spellbound Dominon for lands outside the Empire,
y got me, at principally the United States. Ac-
ad after a cording to official figures recently an-
about that. nounced by the Federal Government,
about it. Canada lost no less than 273,556 citi-
;gering over zens from her natural increase dur.
a minute." ing the decade between 1911 and '1921,
m Illinois." not counting the myriads of immi-
e in the red grants who forsook the land of their
wn the first adoption. These figures show the
gle." Guard gravity of the situation. Canada's
aid: "Funny most pressing need today is immigra-
en thinking tion of a desirable type, preferably
What's the British, but at the same time, thous-'
a mean ands of thorough Canadians are
You're from leaving the Empire.
Numbers of McGill graduates have
UFF SED. filled, and are filling, notable positions
S! ! !in foreign countries. While they are
contributing to the development of
show these nations, they are sorely needed
night, in the Empire. The need of trained
men and women has been time and
again stressed by our leaders.
The succession of Andrew Bonar
d much, Law to Lloyd George's premiership
forcibly reminds one of the part Canada
ment plays in the Empire of today. From
a humble New Brunswick manse to
the exalted position of prime minister
use of Great Britain is the almost un-
bridgeable gap by this Scottish-Cana-
hand dian. The Dominions have acquired
a new status since the war, and in-
stead of self-governing colonies, are
now treated as equal partners with
s: the Motherland in the British Com-
,y monwealth of Nations. With this
added prestige, come greater respon-
SEE ME. sibilities which McGill students as cit-
izens of the British Empire should not
R y fail to realize. Britain, already bear-
ing so many burdens, and faced with
b') colossal post-war problems needs the
AW CLUB help of all Canadians. Especially in
wn Daily. the delicate capacity of interpretation
eels! between the, United States and Great
Britain may the bonds of Anglo-Saxon
friendship, so essential to world
CAMPAIGN peace, be strengthened.
- - OOD. 11Rejoicing in our national status, and
on our ac- the countless opportunities awaiting
us, we should forever' keep in mind
that we are Britons ,and after com-
pleting our university training should
enior bench endeavour to serve in a land where
ial where flies the Union Jack, whether it be
real indus- on the golden prairies of western Can-
ada, in the rich region of the Rand,
very thor- in the far-off Antipodes, or on the;
floor of Westminster.

DO YOU TAKE GAMBLING
CHANCES ON YOUR

CLOTHES?

1 lIL

It has perhaps never occurred to many men that
the buying of ready-made clothing involves a
gamble as to their fit, style and wearing quali-
ties.
It is our desire to assure our customers of the
fact that every suit or overcoat that leaves our
house is tailored to individual measure - on
the premises.

For Michiganensian
Pictures
Phone 598

121 East Washington Street

c ' r..
s.
i
spy f
1
{ t
i
" '' ? si : 4:l s ss
HUI!
l t a

321 St ae St.

I

IF YOU GIVE YOUR EYES

They
count.

needn't drive 'em
N,
** *
STHE REBEL

NECESSARY CARE

I saw him sitting on a s
At the end of the Diagon
The shops play at being
tries.
He was eating an apple
oughly,

And when he had exhausted its pos-
sibilities,j
He threw it over his right shoulderI
With supreme disregard for the refuse

You will be repaid a thousand fold. You have got to use them, of course, but
if you have much near work to do, or have an error of vision, be sure to give
your eyes the help of glasses. And when you get glasses, get RIGHT
glasses. Yes, we can supply you.
We are equipped to grind our own lenses.

ISOLATION

When universities were young and cans
nor the flag itself has made an ap- placed on the campus at intervals
special favorites of fortune, universi- pearance. Considering that the poleI By our paternal university.
is there for only one purpose, it might * * *
ties were more or less a thing apart be well to float a flag on Ferry field
from the world, 'a separate sphere. during the grid contests. We get awfully low sometimes. x
They were not so much a ring in the**
bi- tent of life. but rather a four year.; Even payday doesn't buck us un.

Turks Accept Invitation
Constantinople, Nov. 1.-Hamid Bey,
the nationalist representative at Con-j
stantinople, late yesterday received a
note from the Angora government for
presentation to the allied high com-
missioners, accepting the invitation of
the Allies to the peace conference at
Lausanne.

}

,I

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