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October 31, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-31

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'HE WEATHER
GENERIALY FAIR
TODAY

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INVADE
NEXT SATURDAY

VOL. XXXIII. No. 32

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1922

PRICE FIVE C

4

RO1 \ELIGIBLE IN
BIG TEN ASSE RTS
GRIFFITH
DENIES RUMOR THAT OHIO STATE
REGISTERED OBJECTION TO
ELIGIBILITY
INJURIES WILI, KEEP
STAR OUT I OR SEASON
Fradure More Serious Than First
Believed, Says Archie hahn,
Trainer
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 30.-Milton Roby, star
halfback of the University of Michi-
gan eleven is not playing in violation
of Conference eligibility rules, accord-
ing to Major John L. Griffith, athlet-
ic commissioner of the Western Con-
ference, after investigating a report
that Roby had played three years of
college football before entering Mich-
igan. Previous to the Ohio State-
Michigan game, reports had gained
circulation that Ohio State had pro-
tested Roby.
Ohio State Did Not Protest
"In justice to both Ohio State and
Michigan, I wish to assure the pub-
lie that neither Mr. St. John, director
of athletics at Ohio State, nor any
other Ohio State official sent any pro-
test to me against Roby," Major Grif-
fith said.'
The Wolverine star, it was revealed,
entered the S. A. T. C. at Phillips uni-:
versity in \the fall of 1918, played S.
A. T. C. football, during that year, but
was mustered out Dec. 15, and did
not enter the university again until
the fall of 1919. The Conference rule
provides that S. A. T. C. football does
not count as intercollegiate compe-
tition.
Has Played 1 Year at Michigan
Roby was captain of the Phillips
football eleven in 1919, which counted
as his first year of college competi-
tion. He completed one year of play
at Michigan, which counted as his
second year, and the present year
makes his third.
Archie Hahn, Varsity trainer,. last
night, said that he entertained serious
doubts as to whether Roby would be
able to play again this year.
"When Roby hurt his 'leg," said
Hahn, "it was straightened out, and
an Ohio player sat on it, tearing out
a pfece of the femur with the carti-
lage. This will make it necessary for
the bone to knit, as well as for the
cartilage to mend, before Roby will
be able to play. An injury of this
sort is really harder to heal than a
torn, tendon. Even if Roby's leg were
well in time Ior Ue game with Wis-
consin, it is still very doubtful wheth-
er he would be in condition to play,
and personally I don't think he will
be able to play any more this sea-
son."
APAS STRONG
SUPPORT TO LEAGUE
FOREIVN OFFICE HOPES FOR
ULTIATE ItNIVERSAL SCOPE
OF BODY

I

Hoosiers Carry
Formfit Flasks

WH ER E NEA R EA S T CONFE R ENCE
VILL WEIGH TURKISH PROBLEMS,

I Alum Ius Reviews
Ohio State Game

i

t 1

____._

Students of the University of In-
diana carry flasks that fit into the
hip pocket and they are using the
flasks freely in their classes, and yet
they are still out of jail. The whole
thing explains itself, for Indiana is
having a water shortage, and the Un-
iversity officials have decreed that each
student shall carry his own.
Starting over a week ago, thek
springs and various sources from
which the city of Bloomington draws
its liquid refreshments, balked in
their functions as they have been do-
ing annually for the past few years.
So imminent is the danger that only
a recently issued statement by Wil-r
liam Lowe Bryan, president of the
University, has kept the students from
walking out. The statement is em-
phatic in stating that the University
will not close.
Trucks with capacities of 12,000
gallons of water a day are being kept
busy transporting water about to the
various fraternity houses. Some of
these organizations, even, take pride
in the fact that they consume over
150 gallons a day., according to state-
ments in the papers of Bloomington.
At the present time no hopes for the
revival of liquid interests in the town
are in sight. Political factions are
clashing with respect to the best plac-
es in and about town for the location1
of new springs. The university is
congratulating itself and its far sight-
ed engineers in previously storing;
away a dam full that is at their serv-
ice. A political upheaval of the whole
town of Bloomington seems to be in
sight if reports may be correctly
judged.
PER MANEN lT COAL
RIGGS
Prof. II. E. Riggs Believes Office Willc
Eliminate Plight of Small r
Communities
FUEL DICTATORSHIP TRACES
FROM OLD ENGLISH PRINCIPLE
"I do not believe that a coal dicta-
tor will be permanently necessary,"
said Prof. H. E. Riggs of the civil en-
gineering department, a well known
o.. nrixr x 'nxir tilfbt problems.

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Michigan's victory at Ohio State,
with side lights and accounts of the
trip and of the minor features of the
conquest, makes up the greater part
of the last issue of the Alumnus.
From cover to last page the game is
featured in a series of articles of ev-
ident interest to alumni.
The cover is a photograph of the
dedication of the Ohio stadium and
the frontispiece is another picture of
one of the phases of the play. A gen-
eral article on the game lauding the
players for their work, a detailed ac-
count of the plays, several pages of
team talk, all go to make up the writ-
ten phase of the issue. A double page
photograph of the stadium as seen
during the game is also used.
Aside from the part of the Alumnus
devoted to football, there is an article
on the program of the Journalistic
department that tells of the past and
future of this branch of the Univer-
sity. A picture of the new Journal-
ism building as drawn from one of
the tentative plans, is used as an il-
lustration.,
A discussion of the §cholarship
chart and of the general scholarship
of the University, and an article on
the Upper class advisors constitutes
the other main features of the is-
sue.
SHUTER TO DIRECT
WISCNSINOPERA

Ia
UONION TO LAUNCH
LIFE MEMBERSHIP
CAMPUS WILL BE CANVASSED IN
ATTEMPT TO GAIN
PLEDGES
C. A. GAMPBELL '24E, TO
HEAD THREE DAY DRIVE
Estimate 40 Per cent of Student Body
Do Not Hold Life Cer-
tificate
What is expected to be 'the most
successful life membership drive car-
ried on in the history of the Union,
will be launched by that institution
next Tuesday. The drive will extend
throughout three days Oct. 7, 8, and 9,
during which time every man in the
University who is not yet a perman-
ent member of the Micfigan Union
will be given the opportunity of sign-
ing up.
Plans Undter Way
C. A. Campbell, '24E, has been se-
lected as general chairman of the
drive committee and already has com-
pleted plans to carry on the cam-
paign. Teams are being organized
under captains and a' system Is being
worked out so that every man on the
campus will be visited personally by
one or more members of the team.
It is estimated that 40 per cent of
the students now on the campus are
not life members of the Union. The
first' two days of the drive will be
spent by the teams in seeing these
men according to territories. On the
last day a general "clean up" will be
held on which an attempt will be
made by all of the teams to sign up
every remaining man.
Hans Offers Cup
A silver loving c p has againtbeen
offeredl by Otto H Hans, superintend-
ent of the Ann Arbor Press, to the
campaign worker with the largest
number of subscriptions to his cred-
it. The cup this year is said to be the

Aerial View of Laussane, Switzerland
The next. peace conference scheduled is that designed to bring peace to the warring factions of the near
East. It is the result of the Mudani armistice. The conference will be held at Laussane, Switzerland, Nov.
13. The United States will be represented by an unofficial delegate, at the request of allied nations interested.

ARTIST CHANGES DATE
Mary Garden, the distinguished op-
eratic star, who is to appear in thej
Choral Union Series in Ann Arbor Las
been obliged through her New York
manager to change the date of her
Ann Arbor appearance to December 5
on accownt of a Oelay in her return to
this country from France.
The managemcnt of the Gnivcrsity,
School of Music Wishes tit thost in-
terested in this concert will convey
the announcement of the change of
date to friends and acquaintances who
may be planning to attend.
UNIVERSITY HAS 45000
VOTERS; 12INER EE
Only 12 of the estimated 4,000 Mich-
igan students who are of voting age

FASCISTI HEAD TOI
FORM CABINET IN
ITALIAN UPHEAVAL
C'IA01[ WVITH COMM NISTS FAC-
TION OVER GOVERNMENT
OFFICES
SLIGHT OPPOSITION TO
MUSSOLINI ACCESSION
British Officials In London Predict
No C(hange in Italian Foreign
policy
(By Associated Press)
Rome, Oct. 30.-Benito Mussolini

.'
r

authority on nu!J i pL12. , vfeu
when asked yesterday of his opinion and who are not residents of Ann arrived here today after having been
with regard to the recently passed Arbor had made application for ab- summoned by king Victor Emmanuel
state law establishing a coal dictator- sentee voter blanks Monday. No ap- to form a new cabinet, which, it is
ship, "but I do believe that a man en- plications are to 'be accepted after. believed, will be done today.
dowed with dictatorial power will be Nov. 4, and thus there remain only Igalo
greatly .able to benefit the smaller ' c I(P-Cahsb-
towns where the most acute shortages five days during which time students Roe ct. 30. (Amm-Cishs be-
j ae iklytooccur." may arrange to vote in thecoin; tween fascisti and communists are re-
are likely to 'niconing oported from various towns through-
Old Eglis Lawelecion'out Italy. Several were killed at Gen-
Professor Riggs pointed out that the According to Public Act. No. 203 of azzano, Genoa, Palestrina Bologna,
law was based on an old English 1917 any absent voter, that is, any a Fn
legal principle which began to devel- Fr7mnylmost al, haeisiayendFhnz.gh.
op during the middle ages. "The first regularly qualified voter who expects From almost all the cities through-
instance of government regulation to be absent from the ward or district s out the country come stories of dem-
was the legislation regarding black- of his residence on the day of any the government offices by "black
smiths, placing certain requirements election, is entitled to vote in the shirts".
on them..following way: At Faenza forty fascisti occupied
The idea was that when those fur- prefecture and took over the postal,
nishing a public service or a commo- At any time during the 30 days pre- pefere, and too oer tepostal
dity neessary to the welfare of the ceding the election lie maymake appli- telegraph, and all other governmental
offices. The same thing occurred at
people failed to perform their func- cation to the township, city, or vil- Verona, where during the reoccupa-
tion properly, the government had the lage clerk in person or by mail for tion of the offices by the military, one
right to interfere and enforce their an official ballot. Such application is fascisti was killed.
operation," said Professor Riggs. He to be made on a blank of a form pre-
fomean ssetial te re in id-sh scribed by law, which on request will (By Associated Press)
perfomda seta evc nad
perfthtrdanessenthaerieHeid-Immediately be mailed by the clerk to London, Oct. 30.-A dispatch to
fng the travel of the time. Hotels any voter who asks for it. the Times from Rome points out that
were also regulated, according to this Blanis may be obtained by stu- the government refrained from op-
fundamental principle. dents from the office of the city clerk, posing the fascisti because it would
Coal Men Oppose J. M. Reynolds, in the city hall, at the have been difficult to persuade the
In this country the outstanding corner of East Huron and Fifth troops to fire on them. The dispatch
modern example of state regulation streets, or will be mailed to the stu- j says that nevertheless for a time the
was the work of the interstate com- dent on request. These blanks may situation was dangerously critical.
o merce commission and the operation also be obtained from the clerk of and was really saved by the refusal
of the railways by the federal govern- the city of residence of the student. (Continued on Page Eight)

REGENTS GIVE DEGREES
Three students in the Engineering
college had degrees conferred upon
them at the meeting of the Board of
Regents last Friday. Willis B. Hayes,
Jr., received the degree of Bachelor of
Science in civil engineering, Charles
B. Carroll, B. S. E. in mechanical en-
gineering, and William C. Naylor, B.
S. E. in aeronautical engineering.
The names were not available for
the list published in the October 28
issue of The Daily.
VICE- PRESIDENT1LAUDS,
HIBBNGACHIEVEMENTSd
Cincinnati, Oct. 30.-Vice-president
Calvin Coolidge, speaking at a repub-
lican rally here tonight, dwelt upon
the accomplishments of the Harding
administration, and urged the voters
to "stand by the president". A con-
siderable portion of the address was
devoted to what the Harding admin-
istration has done for the farmers,
calling attention to the emergency
tariff bill which he said was to pro-
tect American foreign products from
ruinous competition with foreign
staples at a time when a severe de-
cline had occured in agricultural
prices. In the emergency act, and
this, he declared, constituted larger
benefits for farmers than ever before
riven in a tariff law. -
Mr. Coolidge told his hearers a re-
publican congress would stand as a
necessary guarantee against inter-
ruption of the constructive program
of the Harding administration.
HOOSIER CLAIMS RECORD
Bloomington, Ind., Oct. 30.-Follow-
ers of college football in this part of
the country are claiming a gridiron
record for Frank Hanny, captain of
the Indiana university eleven
Called upon nine successive times 1}
he game with Wisconsin last Satur-
day, Hanny carried the ball for three
I first downs for a total distance of 35
yards and then the Crimson lost the
ball on a fumble.
Added to that splendid exhibition,1
danny figured in the speetncvl' Tnlv
of tackling a receiver, of a putn fokf
the seventh time this year. The in-
liana captain has been booting the
hall consistently around the 50 yard
'Park this year.
Craftsmen Receive Third Degree
At the weekly meeting of the Crafts-
.men club last Saturday night in the
Masonic clubrooms two candidates
received the third degree. Many vis-
htors watched the work as it was put
on among which were Hugh A. Mc-
Pheison, a Past Grand Master, and
James Frey, '22, editor of the 'R2
Michiganensian and now editor of the

MIMES WORK TO BE UNDER
CARE OF CARL GUSKY, GRAD.
E. Mortimer Sh ter, director of the
Mimes theater, aidUnion Opera, will
leave Ann Arbor early in February
for the University of Wisconsin,
where he will direct the annual opera
of that school. Shuter expects to be
absent for about six weeks but will

return here in time to supervise the largest and best yet given by Mr.
spring rehearsals of next year's pro- Hans. Also a reward will be given
duction. to the one of the ten teams with the
Wiscon in. Adopt,; MIchigan Plan highest record.
The University of Wisconsin is en- This cup is given yearly by Mr.
deavoring to reorganize its dramatic Hans to stir up more competition be-
activities along the lines adopted here tween the team workers and the
and it was in response to a request teams themselves. Members of these
from that institution that Shuter con- teams will be chosen before the drive
sented to leave his work here for a opens and captains selected. It is
short period. At the time of his dg- the plan of the executive committee
parture, the work on this year's to have everything in readiness by next
opera wil have been completed, the Monday night so that the entire cam-
show produced, and several plays will paign can be put over within the fol-
be in the process of rehearsal. These lowing three days.
new plays Mr. Shuter will direct
through Carl Gusky, grad., who wifl\
have charge of the theater during his IliUM
absence.IET EN NER
Gusky in Shuter's Place TBNl
Gusky has done work at the Mimes
GsyhsdnwokathMie TO HI[ FBtheater, having acted in the Michigan
Union Opera, "Make It for Two," and
in "The Cloister." He has also pro- JOhN W. ROSS, '28, WILL ACT AS
duced one or two one act plays of his EDITOR OF TAU BETAPI
own writing at the Mimnes theater and PUBLICATION
has had several of his plays publish-
ed in book form. He was also con- Letters and articles by prominent
nected with Sam Hume in his produc- ettersanhrticlestbthprominnt
tions last year in Detroit, and with engineers throughout the country,
the "Little Theater" in Ypsilanti. His and reports of the 41 chapters of Tau
principal work at Mimes theater wills. Beta Pi will predominate in the in!-
be to carry on the rehearsals of "The ttial'issue of the "Bent", official pub-
Thirteenth Chair," "Justice," and one j lication of the fraternity which will
or two:ether plays which Mr. Shuter' make its appearance the last week in
will initiate previous to his departure:November. The quarterly will be a
_ta __r __sto _ eparture.double issue, containing 150 pages.
Among the contributions for the
November issue are the following:
"Building a World's Record Trans-
mission Line in the West" by Robert
Commends Editors For Work In Or. Sibley, editor of the "Journal of Elec-
ganizidg Ecndr Lecre eri n Ortricity and Western Industry" "Hux-
___g__ Lley, the Exponent of Veracity" is an
.earticle written by T. A. Rickard, edi-
In a letter to the editors of Whim- tor of the "Mining and Scientific
sies yesterday, President Marion L. Press". C. L. Cory, dean of the Col-
Burton expressea nts appreciation of legs of Mechanics of the University
their work ini organizing a second eeo ehnc ft~Uiest
teires o rgecture g ayserominnd of California, has written an article
series of lectures by prominent on "The Service of the Engineer".
American men of letters. President Prof. R. C. Matthews of the University
Burton emphasized the fact that their of Tennessee, the secretary-treasurer
work was appreciated not only by the of the organization, will present a re-
students of the University, but by the of the rniz ation l conae-
faculty and their families.and haal port of the recent natthnal conven-

Will Leave for Madison Early
February for Six Weeks'
Absence

in

Tokio, Oct. 30.-That the League of
Nations, with the cooperation of those
powers not yet included in its memn-
bership, will achieve the objects for
which it was formed, is the belief of
the Japanese Government. In' ay
statement to t .,ress the foreign of-
fice said:
"It is true that the League of Na-'
tions leaves something to be desired}

in the degree of authority which it ment during the war. Professor
carries among the nations, but the 'Riggs used these as illustrations to
fact that it is not a perfect institu- indicate the tendency of individuals
tion was understood and realized by to complain against government in-
Japan at the beginning, and we en- terferance, just as many coal men of
tere(h it with the hope and trust that the state have denounced the estar
in the fulfilment of its service its lishment of the present dictatorship.
nienibers would derive experience and Professor Riggs feels that although
confidence and gradually work out many of the state coal men are con-,
its imperfections. From the Japan- vinced that the measure is a bad re-
ese point of view the greater misfor- stralnt, they will see its benefits in
tne is the Leaeue's failure to enlist the future.

Bourskaya, Detroit Symphony
Blend In Brilliant Program
(fly Edgar . Ailes) manding beauty.
When Ossip Gabrilowitsch and the This composition is at once one of
Detroit Symphony orchestra left the the loveliest and most powerful works
stage in Hill auditorium last night and in the symphonic repertory. Poetically
the final thunderous echoes of Tschai- and emotionally it has much in com-
kowsky's "1812" overture began to mon with Beethoven's symphony inj
fade away, our only regret was that the same key. The same strife of a
w d ormI i not honr flip whole oncert human h b inpa oni-R-, I Prese l an over-

all of th powers great' as well as
small, in its membership, as was
originally designed.
"The primary objective of thel
4, ®na nd ,inlo-d

ANNOUNCE 'ENSIAN
CONTEST WINNERS

League, which is peace ana unaer
standing among the nations, was not 'Winners in the poster contest be-
only 'urthered to an incalculably ing conducted by the 1923 Michigan-
gre-.t extent by the Washington con- ensian will be announced in tomor-
ference, but the members were stim- row's issue of The Daily. The con-
ulated and encouraged to proceed test closed at midnight last night, and
vigorously upon their labors. The the committee will announce their
League is now endeavoring to extend decisions tonight.
the scope of the naval treaty, signed The purpose of the contest is to ob-
at Washington, so that its members tain posters to be used in advertis-
who were not signatory to the Wash- ing the campaign for the 1923 year
ington agreements may share in their book. Copies of pictures by the suc-
beneficent effects and enjoy the com- cessful candidates will be printed and
fort of the security which those used in the sales campaign that will
agreements provide. be conducted by the Michiganensian

we coui nol near te e U1 I . uman e~1 g ppreV Vy Jlui
repeated; for, both as to selection and! shadowing fate, the same intensity of Tyler-Keystone Masonic monthly.
rendition, the concert was one of re- expression and the same exalted
markable beauty. A twofold signift- paean of triumph at the conclusion, Voting Booths Placed
cance attached to the occasion inas- are manifest in both works. Brahms' Voting booths for absentee voters
much as it served to introduc- to local opus is the more contemplative of have been placed in University hall
audiences Madame Ina Bourskaya,rthe two, but loses nothing in vitality n the diagonal walk near En-
and to re-introduce the Detroit or- on this account, and, under the in- gineering arch for the convenience of
chestra now in its fourth season spired baton of Gabrilowitsch, made students, and it is urged by the Re-
here.. a profound impression evidenced- by gents that all students avail them-I
Brahms' C minor symphony which prolonged applause at the conclusion selves of this convenience.
was the piece de resistance of the of the performance. Especially beau-
evening, was performed in the author- tiful were the andante sostenuto in If
itative manner which we are never which Brahms realizes perfectly the SENIOR ENGINEERSI
disappointed in expecting of the De- I ideal of the symphonic slow move- --
troit conductor. Gabrilowitsch is a ment, and the mighty finale which I A very important but short I
great orchestral director because, soars and surges with unsurpassable 1 business meeting . of the senior
- --i +hi'. ,',r-.'. l.,.mii O .P+,, I 1engineers will be held in Room

members of the faculty would gladly
join him in an appreciation of the
work.
He further pointed out that the edi-
tors were doing an immeasurable
service to the University itself. "'e
presence of these eminent artists,"
said President Burton, "cannot fail to

tion of Tau Beta Pi held in Ann Ar-
bor.
John W. Ross, '23, was appointed
managing editor at the recent conven-
tion and will be assisted by the Mich-
igan chapter of the fraternity.
HOBBS TO ADDRESS VETS

increase and deepen the interest of
aspiring writers and students gener- A smoker is being planned by Rich-
ally." ard N." Hall No. 422 post of the Vet-
erans of the Foreign Wars Society for
Spanish Police Learn ,Jiu-Jitsu the benefit of all overseas men on the
Berlin, Oct. 30.-A German police- campus. The smoker is to be held in
man has just finished giving instruc- rooms 318 and 320 of the Union at
tion in Jiu-Jitsu, the Japanese method 7:30 Wednesday evening.
of self-protection, to guardians of the Professor William H, Hobbs @1q t
public order in Spain. be the principal speaker of the even-
Heurr Woznv of the lRiin eirmin- ini .nd wil h introdued ib rn foc,

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