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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1922 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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SUE WAR PROFITEERS
Washington, Oct. 27.-Preliminary
investigation -into more than 400 war-
time contracts has disclosed that ei-
ther criminal or civil suits Will lid!
necessary in "numerous instances",
Attorney General Daugherty said to-
day, if the government is to recover
even a part of the sum claimed. All
such cases of questionable transac-
tions are now being handled by at-
torneys attached to the war transac-
tions section of the department of
Justice or by U. S. Attorneys through-
out the country.
Of the 425 cases which have passed
the review, 250 came from the war de-
partment, 70 fron the navy, and 50
from the shipping board. Additional
cases are developing from day to day,
the Attorney General said..
TRADE MARK APPROPRIATION
CALLED LEGAL IN ARGENTINE
Buenos Aires, Oct. 1 (By Mal).-j
"The appropriation of foreign trade
marks in Argentine is legal but not
moral," said Federal Judge Escobar
when summing up in a suit brought
by an American soap manufacturing
concern against a local firm which
had barred the Americans from selling
in Argentina because it had registered,
the American company's trade mark
for itself.
Judge Escobar said that, unfortun-
ately, the laws of Argentina indirectly
encouraged the appropriation of for-
eign trade marks and, in view of pre-
cedents created, he would have to
non-suit the complaining company.
He was sorry, he added, that he could
not deal with the question from .a
moral standpoint.
The 'Buenos Aires firm has an-1
nounced that it will appeal for the
withdrawal of the words in the sum-
ming up that reflect on its ethical con-
duct.
MEXICAN PLAYWRIGHTS WOULD
BAR FOREIGN-MADE PLAYS
Mexico City, Oct. 16 (By Mail)-The
newly formed union of playwrights
here and the union of theater em-
ployes are now demanding that none
but their own works be produced on
the local stage, except by special per-
-mission.
Mexican dramatists lead a busy life,
and those who are regularly employed
at the dozen or so theaters here are
required to produce at least two en-
tirely new shows every week. They
are fond of making current politics'
in Mexico their theme, and as a re-
sult. some of the most caustic com-
ments on the present administration
may be found in the theaters. Only
recently, following the return of sec-
retary de la Huerta from New York
where he negotiated with Mexico's
creditors, a sketch was so adversely
critical that it was ordered discon-
tinued.

I German Talking
Film Exhidited
(Continued from Page Nine.)
the stripes to the "electrical eye."
The "eye" is a bulb through which an
electrical stream passes. Its interior,
surface is partially coated with a
chemical substance possessing the
property of separating electrons. As
this process develops, the conducting
power of the photozelle increases. Thel
electrical stream passing through it
increases or diminishes with the vol-
ume of the sound waves.
These phenomena are again ampli-
fied and recorded by the "electrical
mouth."r This instrument comprises
mainly a membrane 30 centimeters in
diameter which is vibrated by elec-
tricity rather than by magnetism. It!
is claimed to be the first actually
workable telephone capable of trans-
mitting loud speaking.
No Jhonograph Needed'
Thus the sounds issue out into the
air from the membrane at the same
time the picture is projected. The
"gramophone" element is eliminated
entirely, yet to a person in the audi-
ence the sounds seem to be coming
from, an instrument of that kind set
up immediately behind the screen
where the picture appears.
At the public demonstration the pro-f
gram included sounds as varied as{
a pig's squeal and the tunes of a bar-
rel organ, to arias from leading
operas. A short speech of introduction
was given by the same means in Ger-
man, English and French. One num-
ber was a recitation, other features
were vocal and instrumental, and one
act of a drama was reproduced. In
the last mentioned the tinkling of a
hand-bell rung by one of the charac-
ters was heard coinciding with the:
movement in the picture, and the
footsteps of actors walking about aE
bare floor were reproduced realistic-
ally in sound.
Sounds Are Life-like
In another section of the program
there was the very life-like barking
of a dag, and the sounds of the ani-
mal's claws could be distinctly heardI
as it moved restlessly about on aI
wooden bench.
Generally speaking, the reproduc-
tion appeared to function better for
staccato sounds, such as 'the notes of'
the xylophon, flute, clarinet, and man-
dolin. In violin and 'cello playing,
and in singing tones of very high or
low register, there was considerable
mechanical scraping such as one hearsE
froma worn record on a talking
machine.

L. Cs REIMAWN WRITES
PROHIBITIONPAMPHLET
PAPER BY 'GRADUATE STUDENT
BEING CIRCULATED IN
EUROPE

.Jap Workers Return to Farms
Tokio. Oct. 0., (By Mail).-It is es-
timated that the factories in Japan
have discharged some 600,000 work-
ers since the business depression,
year before last. Taking 1,866,000 as
the number of industrial workers of
the country, the discharged amount to
almost one-third. It is reputed that

LIBRARY CORRiDOR VASES
CONTAIN HOBBS COLiLECTION

S
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I

Continued from Page Nine.)
cloth, matting, shell and stone money,
a full sized native raft made from
bamboo, axes, trays, native sponges,t
baskets, rope, fans, and knives, mak-
ing it a most interesting study of life
on these distant islands. There are
also on display a number of photo-
graphs taken on the island of Yap.
Huron St. Taxi 25c- 445.-Adv.

MOE LAUNEI
We Call For and Deliver

2355-Fl

-_i4 about 20 percent of the discharged
went to the farms whence the work-
Lewie C. Reimann, '16, former Var- ers had been recruited.
sity left tackle is the author of a pam-
phlet on "What American Universi- IPAPERS PROTEST KILLINGS OF
ties Say in which he justifies prohi- i IEXICANS ACROSS BORDER
bition, as provided in the late Consti-
tutional amendment, and which has, eioCtOt 6-oa es
been circulaed throughout Europehbys Mexico City, Oct. 16.--Local news-
bee ciculte thougou Euopebypapers have made much of the fact
the Intercollegiate Prohibition asso- hat accordingato gures published
cation of Chicago, Ill, by the department of foreign relations,
In his pamphlet, Reimann quotes during the past year only fourteen
many of the prominenttathletic Americans have met violent death in
coaches concerning their attitude on Mexico compared to twenty-one Mex-
intemperance, and shows that the icans killed in the United tates, in-
most successful atheletes are those eluding thirteen in the state of Texas.
who abstain from the use of drink, He The xenapers assett f s
shows that national sentiment is not prove thatptersUaser tts osegres
in favor of the sale of liquor but that ment is not justified in its demands
it is absolutely in favor of the Con- for protection of the lives of its na-
stitutional amendment. tionals here. It is also reported that
He also attempts to show that na- during the past few months the Mex-
tional sentiment would not even per- ican foreign office has made frequent
mit the use of light wines and alcohol- representations regarding alleged
ic beverages, and that there are now killings of Mexicans in the United
being formed numerous societies and States.
high school clubs which are asking
the law-making bodies of the nation
to combat this sentiment which is the Am still in business and ready to
propoganda of mercenaries. serve my old friends and patrons as
always. Julian R. Trojanewski, U. of
M. Barber Shop, 1110 So. University.-
Call 445 Huron St. Taxi. 25c.-Adv. Ad V.

CASH CARDS

204 N. MAIN

TEN PER CENT DISCOUNT I

HALLOWE EN
DECORAIN

PlaceC s,TallyCards,C Etc., Etcs, at
U UNIVERSITY
BOOKST RE

432 Thompson,
Ann Arbor, Mich.,
Oct. 19, 1922.

IRVIN S. COBB'
Dear Sir:

ONE DOLLAR
OR MORE
FOR YOUR OLD PEN
STANDARD MAKE
In i lchange For a
RIDER MASTERPEN
And yciur pen troubles are over
RIDER'S PEN SHOP

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This is a study in psychology. If I guess right and write
the way I guess, you won't throw this letter in the wastebasket and
call the author a damn fool, but will read it through to the end and
say, "Well, there's something to this fellow, after all," and your in-
terest will be piqued so that you will answer, which is the end
sought
At this point I might tell you what it is that I want you to write
me about, but I don't want to do that too abruptly for the reason
that you might think me a sordid business man and not a literary
one, which I am. My field is the short story. I haven't written any
yet, but I am thinking of contributing one or two that I have thought
of to the Saturday Evening Post. I am fast rounding myself out in
the technic of the art, for I am taking a three hour course in How
To Write Short Stories here at the University, and another two hour
course in Titles Which Sell And Titles Which Don't. After I grad-
uate in June I think I will start in pn those two stories.
But meantiem I am trying to keep myself in dance tickets
each Friday and Saturday night by selling the Remington Portable
Typewriter. I've only been a salesman a week and haven't sold any
yet, but I expect to sell a lot. I heard that you had sold your Corona
and had bought a Remington. Knowing, as I do, that theRemington
is the best machine pA the market I do not doubt it a bit, and what
I've got the gall to ask you to do is to write me a short letter telling
me what you think of it, that is, providing your thought is favorable,
and I will insert this thought in the Michigan Daily and then sit
down and await results.
I hardly expect you to answer but I won't be mad if you dp.
Yours truly,
S. H. CONKEY,
Salesman. 1128-J.
Will IRVIN S. COBB answer this letter and tell what he thinks
of the REMINGTON PORTABLE TYPEWRITER?

Should you be in need of a Suit or Overcoat we feel sure it would
be to your adbantage to look" over 'our assortment of, Fall

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WATCH FOR HIS ANSWER THIS WEEK1

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