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October 29, 1922 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-29

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VOL., XXXIII. No. 31 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

RED CRO S P 'ENDS
$95000,000 A YEIR
ON DISABLED VETS
NATIONAL BUDGET GIVES ONE-
THIRD OF TOTAL SUM IN
BUDGETl
U. S. NOT AUTHORIZED
Td SPEND FOR RELIEF

Former Daily Editor, Manager
Tell of Big Improvements Made
In Paper During Past Ten Years
NOTE: Lee AWhite, 10; M. A. '11, of the editorial staff of the Detroit
News, and Norman H. Hill, '11, managing editor of the Evening News, of
Sault Ste. Marie, who attended the annual meeting of the University Press
Club of Michigan, have written their views of The Michigan Daily of to-
day. Mr. AWhite was managing editor of The Daily in 1910-11 and Mr. Hill
was business manager the same year. Mr White is the founder, and was
for three years editor, of the Garg )yle, and with Dana Jones, '10, started
The Wolverine. Mr. Hill was captain of the Varsity baseball team in 1911.

N. E. ICHARDON
HEADS RELI6IOUS,
INSTITUTE SERIES
WEEKLY PROGRAM UNDER S. C. A.
AUSPICES WILL START
NOV. 7
SIX COURSES WILL BE

Legion Auxiliary
Chooses Virginia
Woman As Head

UNION PLANS "HALL Of FAME"
TO HO ORH" DISTINGUISHED MEN
AMONG UNIVERSITY'S ALUMNI

Harinonlois Co-operation, Alm
Organization, Says Chair-
man

of

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 28.-Approximate-
ly $9,000,000 will be expended by the
American Red Cross during the fiscal
year ending next June, for the relief
of former service men disabled dur-
ing the world war. Since the care of
former soldiers and their dependents
has the first gall upon Red Cross serv-
ices, the national body will spend
$3,030,692 for such relief, and with ev-
ery chapter practically adding to the
relief, the total will reach the esti-
mated figure. The funds will be used
for services. the Federal government
is not .authorized to render and for
which it has neither funds nor facili-
ties.
Care of the ex-service men and
their famllies is regarded as a pri-
mary Red Cross responsibility, and
that it should be neither indiscrim-,
(Continaed on Page Ten)
I~MERICA SHOULDATE
NEW OPER"ESBJDRN

By Lee A White
Editorial standards of the Michi-
gan Daily in 1922, as compared with
those of a dozen years ago, are a com-
pliment to the student' public's taste
as well as to the zeal and capacity
of those who have the publication in
charge. Whether the format of the
Daily is simply an echo of the de-
nand for space occasioned by a broad-
er editorial policy does not matter.
When the small city dailies of the
country equal this college product in
average excellence both as to appear-
ance and content, their readers will
have ocasion for self-congratulation.
Better Standards Estabjished
Earlier generations of editors were
wont to charge the student body with
indifference to news of the world at
large, and to c-infine themnselves to
campus affairs strictly. No doubt a
good deal of the Associated Press mat-
ter to which present. day staffs give
discriminating attention is slighted by
some of the readers; but there is
warrant for the faith that what is
persistently served will eventually be
consumed. The resricted policy of
the older Daily was not wholly the
desire of the editors; space limita-
tions were more aggravated and the
resources of the treasury were no
more equal to the demand than were
printing facilities. But despite this
justification of earlier policy, it must
be admitted that with the passing of
years better standards have been es-
tablished, and a way made for their
realization.
News Sources Broadened
The technique of editing cannot im-
prove greatly because the experience
of the sub-editors is always limited
to the college generation; and they

By Norman H. Hill
From a six page paper of five col-
umns to a rage, to a real newspaper
that runs eight, ten and twelve pages,
is real progress. In my years on the
business end of The Daily we had to
fight for advertising patronage, es-a
pecia'ly for foreign business; now it
comes without great effort, apparently,
because the advertising agencies have
been taught that college newspapers
are the finest kind of mediums for
certain products. I am struck par-
ticularly with the mechanical improve-
ments in the raper, the modern make-
up, the excellence of the advertising
typography and the impression one
who knows newspapers gets that this
advertising space is bought and paid
for and the cony carefully prepared
because it is a first rate-business in-
vestrment.
:No Smoking"
An evidence of the advancement
wrought through the years is the fine
and modern publication offices shared
by The Daily with the other student
publications. Some of the old-timers
miay look askance at the sign which
warns against smoking, but it is sug-
gestive of the fact that work and notI
play comes first. There was a gen-
eration of newspaper workers who be-
lieved in pigsty surroundings and the!
"typical" newspaper office of the ro-I
mantic novel and motion picture is
a paper-cluttered bedlam, but the coldl
facts are that a neat and business-likeE
office is reflected in a pleasing and
intelligent make-up and in well-edited
copy. The Daily is, therefore, to be
congratulated upon its unusually pre-
sentable home, and all that it implies.)
New Location, Control
It was during my time that The
Daily moved from inadequate quar-
ters downtown to the Press building,
and at the same time came under a
certain measure of adult supervision
and faculty control. Some of the joys
and thrills of those pioneering days=
are gone, perhaPA, but the finished
product is much superior, from a busi-
ness and mechanical standpoint, and
Michigan alumni, as well as Michigan
students, may well take pride in know-
ing that their university boasts a de-
cidedly creditable newspaper which'
is, it may be mentioned incidentally,I
(Continued on Page Ten)

Library Displays
Hobbs Collection

j OFFERED ON PROGRAMI
Bible, Interpretation, Leadership,
Development of Ideas
Among Subjects
Norman E. Richardson, head of the
department of religious education of
Northwestern university, author and
lecturer, will be the principal speak-
er at the opening banquet of the Re-
ligious Institute's program of relig-
ious education tomorrow evening at
the First Baptist church. The relig-
ious education program is to be given
weekly from Nov. 7 to Dec. 5 under
the auspices of the Student Chris-
tian association.
Six courses will be offered, as fol-
lows: "The Relation of the Old Test-
ament to Christian Leadership", by
Prof. Leroy Waterman of the depart-
ment of Semitics; "Teaching Meth-
ods", by Prof. C. O. Davis of the sec-
ondary education department; "The
Origin and Development of Religious
Ideas and Institutions" by Prof. J. E.
Kirkpatrick of the political science
department; "Oral Interpretation of
the Bible" by Prof. R. D. T. Hollis-
ter of the public' speaking depart-
ment; "The Story of. the Bible" by
Dr. Thomas M. Iden.
The opening banquet will not be a
part of the religious education pro-
gram, but a meeting at which each
course will be outlined.' The address
by professor Richardson will be given
following the supper.
Prof. Richardson reecived his B. A.
degree from Lawrence college :n
1902, and his Ph. -D. degree from Bos-
ton university in 1911. He was pastor
of the Methodist church at Mosinee,
Wis., from 1889 to 1891. He served as
professor of religious psychology and
head of the department of religious
education at Boston university from
1911 until 1919, when- he became
chairman of religious education at
Northwestern university.

There has been displayed in the
wall cases in the corridor of the Li-
brary for the past week or two a
collection of articles from the islands
of the western Pacific ocean, includ-
ing notably the island of Yap, Lord
North island, Sonsoral island, the Pe-
lew islands, and the islands of Su-
matra, are included in the presents
wall case displayed in the Library
corridor. These articles were col-
. lected by Prof. W. H. Hobbs of the
Geology department during the fall of
1921, and have lately become the
property of the anthropological de-
Dr Date Waller Barrett partment of the Museum, with the ex-
Dr. Kte Iception of a few boat models which
Dr. Kate Waller Barrett of Virginia are the property of Mr. Walter Wil-
was elected president of the Woman's gus
Auxiliary to the American Legion at Many of the islands visited by Pro-
its recent convention in New Or- fessor Hobbs are ndt on any regular
steamship routes, and as a result are
rarely visited by white men. The
MIMES TROPHY IS United States government placed the
NOW ON DISPLAY gunboat "Bittern', at the disposal of
Professor Hobbs for the expedition,
- so that he was enabled to visit many
The loving cup which Mimes dra- places otherwise inaccessible.
matic society will award to the first The collection embraces almost all'
vaudeville team winning the Mimes of the articles of everyday life on the
dramatic tournament for two consec- islands, and includes several things
utive years is now on display at the of especial interest, particularly one
main desk in the main Union lobby. or two samples of a kind of gold
The names of those taking pait i cloth from Sumatra which has not
the winning act of the tournament been made for many years, and half
will be engraved on the cup, with a a dozen carved wood figurines which
description of the act in which they are also very antique. Among the
take part. A picture of the cup will#: numerous other curiosities in the col-
probably appear in next Sunday's is- lection are models of native boats,
sue of The Daily. (Continued on Page Twelve)
New German "SpecikingMovies"
Are Described For First Time

SWEDISH VIOLINIST LAUDS
MUSICAL POSSIBILITIES
OF ENGLISH

./I

Chicago, Oct 28.-Native Americans j learn only by arduous effort on the
are not alone in maintaining that desk. But in all details of structure,
America is equipped to produce opera and in the broadening of news sourc-
in its own language. In the opinion! es, there is visible improvement to the
of Bruno Esbjoern, formerly conduc- least expert eye. Doubtless each suc-
tor of the Ostersund (Sweden) Sym- ceeding managing editor feels, as did
phony Orchestra, and founder of the I we of three college generations ago,
Chamber Music Society of Ostersund, the necessity of a revolution in make-
now a Chicago violinist on the faculty up and type style. This was supposed
of the Bush Concervatory, "American to be a mark of originality, though in
musical possibilities are magnificent reality it never revealed anything
and American subservience to Euro- more than how well the printshop
pean opera is a mistake. was equipped to satisfy the whims of
"I am not flattering Americans. It the new chief. It doesn't take many
it not flattery to say, as I now say years for the staff to run round the
most emphatically, that Americans are circle and duplicate the achievements
too timid. They go to hear opera in of yesteryear. But this experimenta-
Russian, which they do not under- tion is a sign of the insistent spirit
stand, but are afraid to produce opera spirit of progress, and it reveals it-
in their own language, as people of self editorially as well as mechanic-
other countries do. ally. The edi otwoordhensyo?,M?oz
"Americans have been told that Eng- ally. The editor who does not obey
lish is not adapted to opera, but that that impulse, familiar in all college
is nonsense. To say the least, Eng- daily offices, is likely to produce a
lish well produced is more musical very stale article for his public.
than some languages in which opera Sunday Magazine Lauded
is produced not only in the countries The scope and the interest of the
where those languages are spoken but modern editorial pages and the Sun-
in America. day paper are perhaps the most strik-
"America has both adequate musi- ing of all. Nothing comparable was
cal capacities and an adequate lan- produced in our day, whatever one
guage to create its own opera. For may say for the cogency of the editor-
my part, I liked Lohengrin better ials written by such men as Paul
when I heard it sung in English than Scott Mowrer, '08, today the greatest
when I have heard it sung in the or- of foreign correspondents for the
ginal German. In some cases the Eng- American press.
lish words, being cognates, were al- The old-timer may regret the loss
most the same as their German equiv- of laurels which he believed he won;
alents;.in other they were, to my ear,' but he glories in the advance of The
decidedly more musical. Michigan Daily, not merely in com-
"To be sure, much depends on the parison with its earlier editions but
pronunciation. 1 prefer the American with the entire collegiate press of
pronunciation to the British. It seems America. It has no superior; and
to me that the English are apt to why should it have?
muffle their sounds."
PROBABLE DATE OF

1.
l
G
s
t
l

Berlin, Oct. 10 (By Mail)2-Despite
the fact that success has crowned the
efforts of German inventors at pro-
ducing the "speaking" film, it is fore-
seen that reels of this kind can never
supplant the ordinary "movies" in the
export trade. The handicap is obvi-
ous, since a film produced in German
could hardly be expected to find a.
market abroad where the language

-
1

MICHIGAN UNION
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Fiscal Year Ending August 31, 1922

Total Receipts for Year............
Total Disbursements...............
Balance of Receipts over Expenditures..

i486,981.53
484,824.23

$2,157.30

Profit and Losses
on Departments
Food (Cafeteria &
Restaurant ....
Soda Bar.......
Stand ............
Billiards...........
Lodgings.........
Bowling Alley...
Barber Shop ....
Dances ..........
Rentals ..........
Annual Opera ..
An. Opera (Music)
In. Opera (Trip)
Musical Clubs ....
Yearly Emblems .
Musical Activities.
Valet..........
Spotlight.......
Interest on Invest.
Short and Over...
Total Profits on
Departments ...

Loss
$ 1,814.91
205.01
111.80
117.39
29,869.96
$32,119.07

UNDERWOOD WILL ACT S. C. A. DRIVE SET
The annual drive of the Student
Christian association for funds for the
upkeep of the organization and the
Thomas I. Underwood, '23L, presi- work connected with it will probably
dent of the Union, has been appointed be held Nov. 14 to 16, according to
as delegate of the University for the plans formulated at the last cabinet
annual convention of the association meeting of the S. C. A.
of college and University unions In holding the campaign at this
Dec. 1 and 2 at Toronto, Canada. time, it is believed that a conflict will
The convention is held for the pur- be avoided with the Michiganensian
pose of settling problems arising in drive, which will probably occur the
connection with university unions. At week before this, and with the Un-
past meetings of the convention, the ion Life Membership drive which will
University's representative has been probably take place after the S. C. A.
the one to whom the convention turn- drive.
ed for much help in the way of sug- James E. Duffy, '24, has been chos-
gestions. en chairman of the campaign drive.
Further plans of the drive will be
made at the next meeting of the cab-
DRESBACH ELECTED inet, and will be announced as soon
MIMES PRESIDENT as possible, according to Robert E.
Adams, '23, president of the S. C. A.

Gain
$ 3,519,69
728.98
226.28
9,012.23
1,128.32
1,195.52
4,084.89
1,016.00
3,784.20
1,163.55
,,.332.67
77.14
6.40
573.34
1,279.86
$32,119.07

Operating
House Supplies.........
Wages of Housemen, Eleva-
tor B o y s, Doormen,
Checkroom Men a n d
Managers...........
Telephone..............
Water .................
Taxes..................
Repairs to Furnishings ...
Newspapers and Magazines
Insurance ................
Light and Power........
Cartage of Rubbish........
Dry Cleaning and Laundry
Yard Expense...........
Piano Rental............
General Expense........
Depreciation............
Office Expenses
Wages of Clerks, stenog-
raphers & Bookkeepers
Printing & Stationery ....
Expenses .................
Supplies ..................
Total Office Expense.
Social Activities
W ages ....................
Expenses .................
Printing and Stationery
Total Social Activities
Mechanical Plant
Wages of Engineer, 2 Asst.
Engineers, Electrician
and Carpenter.......
Electric Light.............
Electric Power..........
W ater ..... ..............
Repairs to Building......
Expense. ..............
Supplies ..................
.Total Mech. Plant Ex.
Audit.......................

$ 4,934.79
19,528.13-
1,325.10
391.33
27.47
1,270.05
186.52
2,588.64
1,226.76
298.70
604.00
622.44
10'7.00
158.32
1,000.00

General and Administrative
Expenses Not Applicable t1)
the Departments

would be sufficiently understood to
make its showing profitable.
Promoters of the invention see a
possibility, however, of some day mak-
ing this type of film eliminate the ne-
cessity of having orchestras in movie
theaters.
"Phonafilms" Shown"
Two special showings have been
given in Berlin recently in which in-
ventors revealed their achievements
in making sound synchronize perfectly
with the movements pictured on the
screen. Besides a demonstration dur-
ing the middle of August at which a
number of newspapermen were shown'
the "phonofilm" of Lee de Forest, ofl
New York, there was recently exhib-
ited before several hundred invited"
guests the "Tri-Ergon," an acoustic
film invented by Hans Vogt, Dr. Jo
Engle,'and Joseph Massole.
Five devices form the backbone of
the "Tri-Ergon." They are the kath-
odophon, or "electrical ear"; a spe-'
vial amplifying conduit; an ultra-fre-
quency lamp; the photoezlle, or "elec-
trical eye." and the statophon, orr
"electorical mouth."I
Synchronization Difficult;
Seven transformations are accom-
plished in order to effect synchroni-
zation of sound and movement in the
film. The sound waves to be repro-
duced are first transformed into elec-
tricity; the electricity is converted
into light; the light is changed in
two separate stages into the silver
blackening of the negative and positive
"lms; these in turn are retransformed(
into light; the light again becomes1
electricity, and finally the electricity
produces the vibrations conveying
(sound.
The "electrical ear" naturally is the
first apparatus to come into play. Its
outstanding feature is an ordinary
metal funnel in which the sound
waves are converged to pass through
a nozzle. Opposite this nozzle is a
glowing rod through which a stream
of electricity courses.
Sound Changed to Light
As the rod becomes heated it in-
influences the surrounding air sodthat
this is "ionized," making it capable
of conducting a current. Secondary
electrical glimmers thus appear bridg-
ing the space between the nozzle and
the rod. These flashes represent the
electricized sound waves.
These waves are magnified by the
special amplifier and are fed to a
vacuum lamp. The latter is of such
construction that it reacts to anyl
sound, covering wave intervals all the
way from only 16 to as many as ten
thousand a second. Its rays produce
small strip-es along the side of thel
film. These stripes represent the
sounds and run through the film in
exact coincidence with the movements
in the picture. The interval between

BOARD OF DIRECTORS WILL PASS
ON NAMES OF GRAD-
UATES
HOGAN COMMENDS IDEA
OF INSTALLING GALLERY
Says Institution Ought to Ispire
Pride And Respect in
Students
A "Hall of Fame" containing the
portraits of promnient alumni of the
University will be installed by the
Michigan Union in its building, ac-
cording to plans formulated at the
last meeting of the board of direct-
ors.
The gallery proposed will contain
the photographs only of those mer
whose names have been passed by the
board of directors of the Union.
Many names,, such as that of Henry
Carter Adams, Secretary of Navy
Denby, Harry M. Daugherty, and oth-
er prominent national figures have al-
ready been suggested as candidates
for the "Hall."
The idea has been under considera-
tion some weeks, but has only recent-
ly been planned on, final sanction be-
ing given to the plan Friday after-
noon. Carl T. Hogan, '20E, former
president of the Union, in a recent let'
ter to Homer Health, general manager
of the Union, suggested that "it would
have the effect of developing in the
student body a keen knowledge o the
prominence of their alumni an'd a
passionate pride in all things Michi-
gan".and that "it would be a Mecca
for visitors in the building, and a
source of pride and inspiration to her
sons".
The installation of the gallery will
begin as soon as possible after te'
arranging of all the details involved,
according to Thomas . Underwood,
'23L,"president of the Union.
MEN BY__OCUPATfIOSt
classified by occuations in order that
CLASSIFICATION BY TRADES
WOULD ADD EFFICIENCY
Washington, Oct. 28--Examination
by army officers of Notes taken during
the recent conference here with a sel-
ected group of civilians as to princi-
ples which should govern any future
military draft regulations has brought
out several distinct features which
the conferees were agreed should ap-
ply to the classification of enlisted
personnel.
For one thing it was the judgment
of the civilian conferees, all of whom
had war-time draft experience, that
work necessary in the army should be,
classified by occupations in order
the classification of men called to the
colors could be expedited and their
assignments be based on the similar-.
ity of their civil training and military
work they were best fitted to perform.
It was also believed that the classi-
fication of men should begin when
they were called by local draft boards
and not await their arrival at mobil-
ization centers.
Another point brought out was the
difficulty of dealing in the army with
men of low mental caliber. A sugges-
tion was made that the regulations
should preventsuch men from being
called for active military service.
The conferees were in harmony al-
so as to the desirability of using men
available only for limited military
service from the beginning of the -op-
i eration of the draft law and not de-
ferring such cases for later treat-
ment.
To meet the problem of dealing
E with limited service men and occupa-
tional specialists the suggestion was
'made that clearing pool centers for
each of these groups might be estab-
dished an d that ithe excess from the

various local boards could be turned
over to these pools for further as-
signment. The plan would work es-
pecially well in distribution of spe-
cially qualified occupational special-
ists, it was held.
BIRMINGHAM UNIVERSITY HAS
COURSE iN OIL ENGINEERING
Birmingham, Eng., Oct. 13.-A chair
of petroleum and oil engineering, the
first to be instituted in England, has
been opened at Birmingham univer-
sity. The first course offered to stu-
dents is confined to general mining

$35,069.25

10,820.01
357.15
103.31
348.47
1,000.00
550.68
400.18

$11,628.94

1,950.86

7,425.83
29.35
1,732.69
782.75
505.17
149.22
3,149.40

Charles J. Dresbach, '24, has been
elected president of Mimes dramatic
society. The position was recently
left vacant by Frank McPhail, grad.,:
why is unable to attend to the duties

Poplar Trees To Be Exterminated
All Poplar trees on lawn extensions
which are within the jurisdiction of
the city, will be girdled and cut down,

$13,774.41
723.70

- - I - I - - - - -- - -

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