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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 29, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

IE MICHIG

.DAI LY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
.Association.
The Associatede Press is exclusively en
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited ini this paper and the local
news published therein.
Enere d at the postofficeaattAnn Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, g6o.
Communications not to exceed Soo words
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and >iotices of events will be publshed in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if1
kit at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-1
signed combmunications will receive no con-1
sideration. No rmanuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
doesnt necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the comnmunications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
News Editor................Paul Watzel
t~ity Editor............James B. Young
Assistant City Editor.........Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman......E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-
Ralph Byers Hatiy Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L. I. Hershdorfer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor . .........F. H. McPixe
Sunday Magazine Editor. . Delbert Clark
Women's iEdi-tr...............Marion -Koch
umor Editor........ ..Donald Coney
i'ncerc ditor........If. B. Grundy
Pictorial Edr ................Robert Tarr
Musc Edit....................H. Ailes
Assistants

er should fill this out and return it
to the sender, who will then forward
copies of the ballots together with in-
structions to the voter. Applications
for absent voter 'ballots may be re-
ceived on any of the thirty days pre-
ceding election, contrary to the law
for regular voters, which provides
that applications be received no lat-
er than the second day preceding
election.
College students are particularly
qualified to cast an intelligent bal-
lot. They should be better equipped
to understand the fundamental na-
ture of the questions at stake and
circumstances surrounding an elec-
tion. If people who understand the
true nature of political questions do
not vote the decision of those ques-
tions is left in the hands of unintelli-
gent voters, and an unintelligent vote
is many times worse than none. There-
fore it behooves every student who
has the interests of his home com-
munity at heart and who realizes the
nation's dire need of true citizenship
to take advantage of the absent bal-
lot, and to cast a studied, intelligent
vote.
ADVERTISING PUNISHMENT
To accuse the newspapers of in-
creasing crime by giving so much'
space and prominence to murders and
robberies is nothing new. Newspa-
pers do this to appease the curiosity
of a public which demands excite-
ment, according to certain journalj
ists. But a suggestion made at the'
recent convention of the University
Press club which included editors
from throughout the state of Michi-
gan, offers an alternate method for
the newspapers, by which they may
still have absorbing stories, and yet
do their share in abating crime rather
than encouraging it.
The suggestion is that newspapers
should advertise the punishment in-
stead of the crime. If an individual
reads constantly streamer headlines
concerning some new theft, and later
on the sentence imposed upon the
thief is crowded into a small corner
of the paper where he is apt to over,
look it entirely, the most natural im-
pression is that criminals can "get
away with" most anything they
care to.
Were the speedy punishment of of-
fenders given as much or preferably
even more publicity in the newspa-
pers than the original offense, poten-
tial offenders would begin to see that
crimes do not go unpunished, and
that lawbreaking is hardly worth
while. News stories would be none
the less interesting, "while journalism
would be devoting itself to- a really
commendable service instead of help-
ing to increase the scope of crime
through yellow sensationalism.

OASED RL
CUT ANOTHER
NOTCH FOR
-ILLINOIS 4

rp

EDITORIAL COMMENT

LAST EDITION OF

WELL, GEE! Football is a great
game, a great game. Gets the peo-'
ple out into the Great Out o' Doors.
Gives the opposing team a chance to
dirty their handsome yellow head-
guards. Gives our own team a little
necessary exercise. Lets the band
prove that, despite the fact that oth-
ers may have "160More at Home,"
it is capable of some iniquitous syn-

copating. Not only all that.
DID WE WIN cates
1 i c.
r /larly
. h teriM
sitting
us sa
him,
does
alway
confe
t we
play?"
comin
Michii
Con
YES. team,
WE MODESTLY Pretty
ADMIT IT! t h e'

It edu-
the pub-
Particu-
the Bet-
alf. Lady
g next to
id to her
"W h y
Michigan
ys have a
rence be-
e n every
(See it
g?) Well,
gan is a
n ference
isn't it?
s i g h t,
stands.

Red and blue hats; little plumes of
smoke from the male contingent; pho-
togs trailing in the wake of the band
like small, small boys after a circus
parade; foaming cheer-leaders badger-
ing excited crowds; the Illini singing
band; locomotiv--"Mitch-gan, Mitch-
gan!" RED writes in to ask if it is
or s not appropriate for a State
street drug store to display a sign
reading "WELCOME ILL." We leave it
to you. That's all. Read the poetry
now.-
* * *

Dr thy 1entts
M. 1.Pryo
'Maurice 'Bermian
i2. 1. killington
W. B. Butler
H. C. Clark
A. B. Cunnable
Evelyn J. Coughlin
Eugene Carni ichaie
Ufernadette Cote
Wallace F. aidictt
Ma.wel Fa

1c1h11) ('arlinslirouse
Isabel Fisher
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
'G. G. McShane.
W. 11. Rafferty
W. I Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
1'. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Dickman
Joseph Epstein
J. A. Ruwitch
J. A. Bacon

I)ENISHAWN NIGHT

BUSP'MI 8 STAF 1
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising ............John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising...............Edward F. Conhn
Advertising..............Walter K. Scherer
Accounts..........Laurence iH. Fav rot
Circulation...............David J. M. Park
Publication.............L. Beaumnont Parks
Assistants

Beethoven:
Throbbing music and the flash of1vhite
feet.
Heart of Moonlight wrung with pain.
Chopin:

Scarlet draperies,,
Licking tongues of fire

on the wind;

Flame and Destruction and the,
of Man
.Met in conflict!
(Ever a white-robed Innocence
Stands with beseeching arms
stretched.

Soul

out-

Townsend H. Wolfe
Kenncth Seick
George Rockwood
Perry M. Ilaydeui
Eugene L. Dunne
Wm. Graulich, Jr.
John C. Haskin
Harvey E. Reed
C. L 'Putnam
F. D. Armantrout
11. W.,Cooper
Wallace M~ower
Fdw. P>. Riedle,
Harold I,.]-ale

Alfred M. White
Win. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
names A. Dryer
in . 11. Good
Clyde L. Hagernuan
A. Hartwell, Jr.
J. Blumenthal
Howard Hayden
W. K. Kidder
Ihenry Freud
Tierliert I' Bostwick
L,. Pierce

Schumann:
Wind, wave and cloud
Dance to the sun and the sky;
Dance to the singing birds d
And the flower-carpet of Earth;
Notes light as thistledown
Mingle with the laughter of Youth.
Brahms,
Liszt:
Slow measured melody...

THE FASCISTI "REVOLUTION"
(Detroit Free Press)
The resignation of Premier Facta
of Italy and his cabinet under press-
ure of duress from the Fascisti looks
a good deal like a revolutionary over-
turn. The government certainly quit
in the face of an armed threat. At
the close of its recent convention in
Naples, the leader of the Fascisti, Be-
nito Mussolini, declared he had taken
a solemn oath that either the govern-
ment of the country must be given
peacefully to his organization, or that
the Fascisti would take it by force, as
the society has an army of about 350,-
000 men in the field, and as this army
has the backing of about a million
and a half of non-combatants, there is
no doubt that for the moment it con-
trols the country, and the next ad-
ministration must be agreeable to the
organization.
But if we look into the situation a
little, it is not quite what it appears
to be on the surface. The Fascisti
are patriots; they support the king
and the kingship; they are, in fact, the
party of protest against socialism.
They do not want to overturn the
present system of running the country;
they simply want the abolition of what
they consider abuse.
Mussolini declines to assume the
premiership to which sympathetic ob-
servers say he is entitled until the
country has expressed itself in a gen-
eral election. But he also refuses to
countenance a general eletion until
the existing electoral system, adopted
by Premier Nitti to please the social-
ists, and introducing proportional
election, is cast into outer darkness
by the chamber of deputies. To con-
cede this will be a bitter pill for the
deputies because a good many of them
will be legislating themselves out of
office. But a still more painful medi-
cine for them to swallow is held to
their lips by the Fascisti leaders. This
is a demand that the government quit
its neutral attitude as between the
Fascisti and Socialists andi take se-
vere measures against the bolshev-
ists, to fight whom the Fascisti were
originally brought into existence. The
organization is, in fact a true Nation-
alist party, a party of conservatives,
if you like, organized to save Italy
from the Reds. Though it seems to be
using revolutionary measures, its fun-
damental aim is to preserve the coun-
try from a devastating revolution, de-
structive of its constitution and its
institutions. How wise the Fascisti
may be in their methods is perhaps
a separate question, but we must re-
member in trying to judge them that
what would amount to outrage in
America may be necessary and justi-
fiaple in Italy.
MARING LANGUAGES HUMAN
(Minnesota Daily)
Foreign languages, as they are
taught at present in junior schools,
universities, and colleges throughout
this country, yield to the student, from
a practical standpoint, a very small
actual benefit, if any. The average
student of today taking a three year
course in some foreign language
finds, upon completion of his study,
that he can neither understand the
strange gibberish, mastery of which
he has been so long striving for, when
it is spoken, nor speak the language
fluently, whether it be French, Span-
ish, Scandinavian, German or what
not. He can pick out the grammati-
cal errors in another's speech or
writing to a fair degree of accuracy
and rgularity; but to understand the
strange tongue with ease, or to con-
verse in it fluently, is far beyond his
sphere of accomplishments.
From a practical standpoint, ac-

quaintance with a foreign language is
an asset only in so far as it is useful
in post-graduation days-in later life.
Few men, or women, ever have occa-
sion to read French literature exten-
sively. Few men, on a relative scale,
choose for an avocation the teaching of
French-and, verily, those who do,
must be able to speak it, as well as
teach it. The majority find French
useful solely from the standpoint of
business, conversation, travel, nation-
al diplomacy, politics, and teaching.
To this class, the ability to speak
Frenh fluently and, in turn, to under-
stand readily when French is spoken
to them is essential-the first need!
This is true not only of French, but
of every foreign language being
taught. Fluency in speaking is the
prime requisite-the first need!
The universities throughout the coun-
try-not particularly Minnesota
should meet this need. More stress
should be laid on the proper speak-
ing of the language being taught and;
less on the particularities of gram-
matical structure. Instead of talking
English in the classroom talk the
language be ng taught. When the
'boys" returned from "overseas,"
eevry man of them could both speak
and understand the French tongue
with ease, although most of them had
neverse3 .coFn r enh ne xtvt vin.q

DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-
6:oo a.m., 7:oo a.m., 8:0o a.m.,,9:05
a.mn. and hourly to 9 :05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)- :47 a.m., and
every two hours to 9:47 p.ir.
Local Cars East Bound--7:oo a.m.
and every two hours to 9:oo p. m.,
i :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only- 11:40
p.m., 1 :15 a~m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--7:50 a.m.,
I2:o p.m.
To Jackson and' Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a m', 12:47, 2:47,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at
8:47 p.mu.

- I

.,

'I

CONSERVATIVELY COLLEGIAN
IS THlE COLLEGE MAN'S
IDEA OF STYLE.
THE LYTTON COLLEGE SHOP
EXPRESSES IT - WELL.

$35 AND UP

1922 OCTOBER 1922
S M T W T F S;
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28,
29 30' 31
Start Right With a Good ilat!I
We do all kinds, of HIGH
CLASS Cleaning and Reblocking
of hats at low prices for GOOD
WORK.
We also make and sell POP-
ULAR PRICE and HIGH
GRADE hats, FIT THEM TO
YOUR HEAD and save you a
dollar or more on a hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops
at State Street),

I

MIC HIGAN

Our Representative Will Visit Your Town
This Semester - Watch for Announcement

$QteTrgC..gtton8So$011

s * A T

AS

CHICAGO

.,

t

BOTH STORES

Read
THE COLLEGE CURRICULUM
A Supplement to
The New Republic
"The ablest of our weeklies."-Vanity Fair

NIORENCI-ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedule in Effect October 18, 1922
Central Time (Slow Time)
D .X X D
1'.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.
w 5 6:5s Lv. Morenci .Ar. 1:35 9:35
(l-otel)
3 45 7:45 ... Adrian ... 124s 8:45
1:1 815 Teumsh .. 2'1 8:
:30 8:30.. . Clintc'n 1 2 .i :oo 8 :oo
i:15 9:15 . . Saline ...1. :15 7:15
5:.45 9:45 1Xr'nn Arborhv. 10:45 6:45
(Court House Square) A. M.
D--Daily. X-D aily except Sundays
and Holidays. Friday and Saturday special
ous for students leaves Adrian 1 :45, leaves
Ann Arbo: 4:45.
JAMES IT. L LIOTT, Proprietor
11011e 026-M Adrian, Mich.

with articles on the American Collige by
President A Meiklejohn of Amherst 'President M. L. Burton of Michigan
Professor Karl Young of Wisconsin Professor H. B. Alexander of Nebraska
Professor John Erskine of Columbia President H. W. Chase of N. Carolina
Professor.tuart P. Sherman of Illinois President W. A. Neilson of Smith
Professor A.W.Vernon of Carletoa , rofessor Clifford H. Moore of Harvard
and-the first of a series of six articles by
WALTER LIPPMANN
9n the value to education and social science

be remedied! Let Minnesota pave the
way!

.a I
I I*
u41
a
- I
I
ii
uI
U

SONG

B OOK

Got a room to rent. A Daily c lassi-
fled ad will fina a roomer.-Adv.

Lose something? A classified
the Daily will find it.-Adv.

in

WHEN IN CHICAGO - VISIT THE LYTTON COLLEGE SHOP

SUNDAY, O'CTOBER 29, 1922

Night Editor-JUiIAN ELLIS MACK
THE TIME TO FlGHT
Yesterday afternoon Michigan won
her second Conference game of the
football season from Illinois;' by a
large score. The team displayed a
driving- power and organization of
such a calibre that even Michigan
alunni found it difficult to seek com-
parison in the past. Nevertheless,
Michigan is only half way to the goal
of championship, and two of the hard-
est battles still remain to be won.
This is io time to become over-
confident. Yesterday afternoon Mich-
igan played splendid football, but the
score was not gained on that alone.
Illini's fighters deserved better for-
tune than lhey received. Every

a team handicapped
Illinois in the second
ough Michigan for al
without once losing
t 100 yards was a glo-
for Illinois, aind it
o know that her team,
inbeatable, is not in-

THREE BEST HOURS
Sinuous movemnt and posturing. . ..
Recently a professor, viewing the White-robed Innocence dreaming of
question of how many hours' of study Love.. .
a day yields the greatest rate of re- Manna Zucca:
turn per hours of application, basing Dancing forms
his decision upon statistics taken in Caught in a woven ecstasy of sound;
industrial fields, 'where the most ef, Joy calls to Joy!
flicient number of hours for a work- Life ascends the heights.
ing day was being sought, made the The heat of noon beats down.
statement that in his opinon the aver.
age student who spent three hours (Come Night and sleeep.)
each day in good consistent study II
might easily make Phi Beta Kappa or Black lace and yellow flounces,
any other honorary scholastic socie- A gaily colored shawl,
ty. Three hours a day spent in real Red heels that tap the floor;
study afforded the maximum return A rosej
per hour of application, and was suf- Pinned carelessly against smooth
ficient to insure the average student black hair;
creditable grades and a satisfactory Eyes that compel:j
college education, in his opinion. Senora?
Undoubtedly the law of diminish- Short jacket and black scarf,
-ing returns does apply to studying, Hat at rakish angle,
and there is a point after which al- Drumming of feet,
though one continues to learn the A bold glance from black eyes:
learning is less rapid and the pro rata The Toreador at play.
return .less. And there is no ques. Is. this all of Spain?
tion but that the percentage of re-
turn from too little studying is less!
than had a little more time been spent Ladies of Old France
therein. Hence there is a point in In diaphanous lavenders and pinks;
the scale of hours of study at which The Troubadour with his lute,-
the student can be most efficient in in a garden.
his work, and if that point is faith- (Do you love me?)
fully adhered to he may feel the sat- IV
'isfaction of knowing that he is get- All of the barbaric
ting the most out of his efforts in Dwells in Tepancaltzin,
college. The three hour period as Emperor of the Toltecs.
the unit of greatest returns is based (Black throne and robe of green
upon statistics applicable to studying, feathers,
and a daily three hour period of Headdress that flaunts its royalty,
consistent study ought to insure for The dance of fans and staves!)
the student a satisfactory return for
his years spent in the university. Xochitl, the princess,
But such a schedule if faithfully A red flower on either ear,
carried out means the formation of Sways before the king,
a regular time of studying, an appor- Hercrimson mouth upturned.
tionment of the d'ay's program into
regular study periods and the forma-I Glittering dagger-blade
tion of a habit of studying at those .And the hovering shadow of Death!
periods.}
There is some satisfaction in know- Love,
ing that one is receiving the most re- And the throning of a queen.
turns from his time of application, P
And if the idea of a three hour period *AI*
as suffilcent studying time holds true,
the student who sets aside the three This is not the first number of
hours for uninterrupted study will Whimsies.
gain the greater satisfaction of know- * * *
ing that he may spend the rest of the Some noises annoy Illinois.
day in any maner he may choose, * * *
feeling that his University work is

EVERY M kN TO HIS TRADE
WE ARE PENMAKERS
RIDES for PENS
35 Years Experieace

Nor, ofjntelligence Tests
GRAIAM BOOI STORE
WAHR B03K STORE .orsenda
STUDENT SUPPLY STJRE forathru
scription.
15c

~ .

dollar bill ,
i coupon
e months'
tance Sub.

Three weeks from now Wisconsin
meets us on Ferry field, and one week
later Michigan. battles with Minneso-
ta on foreign territory. From now,
until that last minute of play is over
in the last game of the season, Mich-
igan must realize that it is an im-
mense task to- ;in a Conference chant-
pionsbip, and that it takes Fight,
Fight, Fight, on through. until the
time is ripe for shouting.
A TEST OF CITIZEN SHIP
College students are being urged
to vote in the coming fall eldetions. by
means of ahserAt -voter bAllots. In the
Public Act relative to "absent voters"
students atteading any institution of
learn ng re expressly included. The
Act defines 'such a voter as "any
oualified elector, who is absent or ex-
pects to be absent from the township
or ward in which he resides on the
day of any election or official pri-
mary election.'"

I

ent voter"~may vote in the
nanner. At any time during

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