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October 28, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-28

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'INIJEI) FAIR
TODAY

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THE ILLINI
WELCOME

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VOL. XXXIII. No. 30

EIGhT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1922

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

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U NI ERBSITY CETS
$4O,0OOO I3ANTT O
FINISH TELESCOPE
DONATION BY LAMONT, '91E, WILL
A) AMSTRONOMY DE.-
PARTMENT
MAIN, PARTS WILL BE
SECURED IN GERMANY
ContributIon Scured Through Donor's
Friendshyip for Professor
Hussey

lFaces Hard east
Test, i

G Acknowledgment of a gift made by
a Chicago ;alumnus, Robert P. La-
mont, '91E, whereby the University
will .be enabled to complete a huge
telescope which it has had under
construction for many years, was an-
nounced yesterday by the Board of
Regents at their monthly meeting.
Mr. Lamont's contribution is made be-
cause of his long-standing interest
in his alma mater, his interest in
astronoy and his friendship for his
former schoolmate, Prof. W. J. Hus-
sey of the astronomy department.
Gift Long Ready
The Lamont contribution, which
has been available for some time and
has been merely awaiting a favora-
bile time for its use, makes possible
the purchase of the crown and flint
discs required for the construction
of the objective glass, which is the
most essential part of a telscope as
well as the most difficult to manufac-
ture. The other parts of the big
telescope, ultimat elyto represent an
expenditure of approximately $40,000,
have been completed practically and
now await the securing of the discs
and the reflector.
Professor Hussey, who is director
o t tiM bservaitory t the IJnive'rsity
Sh l bei-an adr hdof the depart-
ment, announeod today that Mr. La.
mont had cnfirmed his gift which
makes possible the final, steps in the
telescope's construction. The big
disc will come from the works of
Shott & Sons at Jena in Germany the
American agents of that company
having informed Professor Hussey
that discs of th necessary size had
been produced at the Shott works
and might be ordered.
Larger Disc Possibe
There is a possibility that the re-
fractor disc may be 27 inches in diam-
eter instead of the 24 inches origin
ally planned for. If this increased
size is attainable, the telescope will
be of even more value and power
than anticipated. Only slight modi-
fications in the construction of the
other parts of the telescope will be
necessary ,however. Inasmuch as
practically all of the cmtitruction
work has been done in the Jniver-
sity of Michigan observatory shops
and no machinery donated by Mr. La-
mont( these alterations will be easily
affected.
It is the present intention to take
the telescope upon its completion to
South America or to Australia and
there to complete the observations
commenced by Mr. Hussey so many
years ago and which have to (o with
the discovery'of the measurement of
the double stars. All the work of this
type which is possible from the ob-
servatories in North America has been
been completed and it is necessary to
o to the southern hemisphere to com-
plete the survey of the southern heav-
ens or to the ,South Pole from some
~point there.
First Attempt in 1911
Attempts wer'e made first to secure
the necessary glass for the telescope
as long ago as 1911. Repeated at-
tempts by glass workssfin European
countries were not successful in se
curing the size of disc needed. The;
beginning of the war prevented fur-
ther attempts and it was not until the
recent advice from Jena that there
appeared any immediate prospect of
comi)pleting the telescope.
Mr. Lamont has been a real friend
to the University, this gift being only
one of many to the observatory and
the department and also a part of his
many gifts to the University as a
whole. He is largely responsible ?or
the present size of Palmer field, the
girls' athletic grounds, and contribut-
ed largely to t"e Michigan Union. His
interest in the University of Michigan
has never flagged since he obtained
his master's dgree here. {1

Herbert Steger, who will get his big
chance today to prove his mettle
when he steps into the place left va-
cant by Roby, who is forced out .of
play for the present at least, because
of injuries received in the Ohio fray
last Saturday.
290TICKETS REMAIN
FOR ILLIOIS9SME

STANDING 10031 SPA CE, WILL
PROIJ)I) FOI9 R f,409

BE

Announcement was made last night
by the Athletic association that the
200 remaining seats for the Michi-
gan-Illinois game this afternoon will
be on sale this morning for the gen-
eral public at the Athletic association
ticket office. This remaining section
is the last of the reserved seats, the
entire rest of the stands being sold
out early this week.
Standing room at the game may be
obtained by calling at the ticket of-
flce any time this morning. Five thou-
sand people will be allowed to see
the game this way, if necessary. This
space will be put on sale as soon as
the remaining seats are sold out.
It is estimated by the ticket office
that the entire number of spectators
who will witness the game from tiie
stands, bleachers and from behind the
ropes, will reach the 42,000 mark.
This is the largest crowd Ferry field
has ever held and will duplicate the
record breaking dedication crowd of
the Michigan-Ohio State game of last
year.
YELLMASTERS HOLD
F I N A L REHEARSAL
Members of the. Varsity cheerlead-
ing squad were given a final drill yes-
terday afternoon in preparation for
this afternoon when they will appear
before 42,000 spectators at the Michi-
gan-Illinois game. The practice of
uniform .arm movements to go with
each indivual yell made up the mnain
part of the exercise.'
The plan as worked out at the Ohio
State game is the combination of
three leaders in each cheer. The
squad now has standard uniforms and
it is desired that the yells be lead ac-
cordfing to a given system so as to
carry out the regularity, in appear-
ance and movements.
Since the Ohio State game two men
have been dropped from the squad due
to ineligibility. The vacant positions
will be filled by competition. All men
who wish to tryout for the positions
should report at Ferry field before 2
o'clock this afternoon in uniforms of
white trousers and sweaters.
. L
;PARKP NG RULES FOR TODAY .

P B ESIO ENTBUFIT ON
OIUNESAD\\ANCE
IN BiINGPLANS
JOU12,N 1LI1U431 BflI.ING N EWEST
Al)PITION TO THE
LITER ARY SCHOL FUND
REQUST4AD OF BOARD
Editors of State in Annual Banquet
Urged to Gve Readers
the Facs
Two hitherto unannounced advances
in the building program of the Uni-
versity were outlined last night by
Prciident Marion LeRoy Burton he-
fore the editors of the state at a
hanq'iet given by the University Press
club in connection with the program
of its anaal meeting.
One of Abe plans caled for a new
ournalism building to be located at
the northwest corner of State and
Jefferson streets. The other was
concerned with the construction of
the new Literary building.
Progress Slow
As explained by the President, no
immediate steps can be taken in the
actual construction of either ofnthese
buildings at the present time a-
1hough the program is far enough ad-
vanced to admit of the showing ofC
tentative rlans.
In the case of the Literary build-
ing oney has already been voted by
the legislature for it, and all that is
necessary to start construction is the
approval of the State Administrative
Board. The Board has already been
asked to release the funds.
The Journalism building is not so
far advanced. Before any definite ar-
rangements can be made the pro-
posed plans must 'first go before the
Board, which will probably receive
them some time this coming month.
The Board will be asked to present
them to the legislature at its meet-
ing in January. If the legislature in
turn votes the funds for the comple-
tion of the structure, the University
can then take steps toward complet-
ing its plans
The tentative proposal for which
plans have already been drawn calls
for the housing of the University
Pressfi, the Student Publications and
the Journalism department within the
building.
Literary Structure Pretentious.
"The literary building will be so
pretentious," President Burton de-
clared, "that we need have no fear of
it looking second place to anything
on the campus, even to such a mag-
nificent structure as the new Law
building, which is to be erected."
The President explained that the
building will be 600 feet long and
will extend from the site of the old
Zoology Museum to the present Law;
building. According to John M. Shep-
rad, supervisor of the building pro-
gram, no attempt willbe made to
build the entire structure at one
time. Only the central section will
he included in the original plans, and
this will be located on the site where
the old Literary building now stands.
Gives General Plans
In a less definite way President
Burton' explained to the editors the
more expansive aspirations of the
construction plans of the campus.
Among the campus centers of the
future as outlined by President Bur-
ton will be the Mall, which is to be
an extension of the present mall be-{
tween the Natural Science building
and the Chemistry building and will.
follow the present Ingalls street at
least as far as Huron street. On the
east side of the street from North
University to Washington will be the
University of Michigan League build-
ing, for which a campaign for funds
is now under way. To the east of this

building, north of the Dentistry
building, an open air theater is pro-
jected. The University School of
Music will have a building west of
the Mall, to the rear of Hill auditor-
ium. North of this and of the League
building, it is hoped that a "University
museum may be erected. ,
President Burton expressed the
hope that it might be possible event-
ually to erect a Campanile at the
head of the Mall.
"Print the Facts"-President
The editors were urged by the.
President to keep the facts of the
building program before their read-
ers. Taxes of the State of Michigan
are not high because we are having
new buildings here," he declared, and'
nrnras arlAtoc ww at .aninfiita

Captain Wilson, Illini left end, who
will be Goebel's rival in field leader-
ship as well as on the line. The game
this afternoon will, be the means of
judging the superiority of the two-
captain ends.
.R WITK ILLIN
Specials Bearing Suckers to Arrive
This- Morning; Will Form
Parade
DETROIT ALUMNI WILL JOIN
STUTDENTS AT FERRY FIELD
(Special to The Daily)
Champaign, Ill., Oct. 27.-115 of the
275 members of the university band
entrained on the Michigan special at
12:45 o'clock this morning, along with
250 other students, on the first lap
of tjhe trip to Ferry field to play at
the Michigan-Illinois game this after-
noon.
The presence of Harding's men at
Ann Arbor today has been made pos-
sible .by the co-operation of univer-
sity students and twin city residents
in backing the "send the band to
Michigan" drive which resulted in the
collection of $2,100, the necessary
amount needed for the expenses of
the trip.
The drive, which was staged by
Delta Theta Epsilon, honorary coach-
ing fraternity, Tribe of Illini, and
Skull 'and Crescent, campus organiza-
tions, was probably the shortest and
most successful of its kind ever
launched on the campus.
The Michigan special will pull into
Ann Arbor at 9:30 o'clock this morn-
ing. A parade will be formed immedi-
ately, and the band will march
through the business and University
districts.
Detroit Illini will be at the game in
full strength, according to word re-
ceived last night, and plan to parade
with the band.
The special train will be held in
Ann Arbor until midnight tonight,
when it' will start on the return trip,
arriving in Champaign at ten o'clock
tomorrow morning.
LOCAL HOTELS FILLED
All the rooms in local hotels have
been reserved for the week-end of to-
day's game for some time past,
according to statements made by the
managers yesterday. Most of the
rooms have been reserved for a week
or more and one hotel reports that all
its rooms have been engaged for over,
a month.
Besides the crowds who have re-
served rooms in the hotels, a 'num-
ber of alumni will be entertained at
the various fraternity and sorority'
houses that are holding reunions at
this time.

CONQUEST OF BUCKEYES GIVES
YOSTMEN EDGE OVER
ZUPPKE'S MEN'
WOLVERINES PROMISED
HARD FIGHT BY INDIANS
Suckers Toughened for Today's Fray
By Close Clash with Strong
Iowa Gridders
(By Frank McPike)
Can an admittedly weaker football
team, spurred on only by the driving
force and dynamic personality of one
man, contend on even terms with a
team looked to today as one of the
most powerful machines in western
grid circles?
This is the question that will be an-
swered at 3 o'clock this afternoon
on Ferry field when the Illinois and
Michigan elevens meet for their ninth
annual conflict. Illinois is the team
generally looked upon as weaker,
Michigan is the one which wise ones
are picking for the class of the Con-
ference ,and he of all the mental
influence is one Robert Zuppke, coach
of the Illinois aggrega ion. The
principals are cast, the stage is set
curtain.
Zuppke Eager for Win
Much depends on the outcome of
this afternoon's contest, more than
appears on the face of 'things. For
the Maize and Blue representatives,
success this afternoon means that one
more rung on the climb to the Big
Ten title has been negotiated and a
difficult obstacle surmounted. For the
Illini, . a victory will mnake the sea-
son successful even if the rest of the
games on the schedule should be lost.
A win over Michigan, by any margin
whatsoever, would be the crowning
achievement of a long list of Zuppke
successes.
Should Michigan be tripped up this
afternoon after the glorious start
made at Columbus last week end, there
would be nothing for the Wolverine
team and adherents to look forward
to but a repetition of the fighting up-
hill struggle which fhas become so
familiar since 1919. If the Illini are
defeated they will be on their way
to a season worse than the disastrous
campaign of 1921. Neither eleven will
take any chances this afternoon. That
much is certain.
More psychology will be involved in
this afternoon's affray than has been
the case in a football game here in
years. It was on nerve and. fighting
spirit alone that Illinois held the
powerful Iowa aggregation 'to an 8f
to 7 victory last Saturday, just a
week after the Hawkeyes had stun-
ned the east with a 6-0 spanking of
Yale.
Iowa Met "Fightln' Fools"
Zuppke's men went into that battle,
lashed by the little mentor's tongue,
with the idea that rather than submit
to a big score humiliation before the
Homecoming crowd they would be
literally carried from the field. To use
a favorite expression they were fight-
ing fools.
They snapped and snarle at the
Hawks on every play; they upset the
great Parkin in his tracks every time
Ihe moved; they almost snapped the
plunging Gordon Locke in two; they
played Jones' team to a standstill in
three quarters. It was nothing but
a blocked punt that gave the Iowans
their skimpy one -point margin and
they retired from the field virtually
a defeated team. Michigan followers
who are inclined to take the Suckers
lightly will find food for considerable
thought in the fact that Illinois made
three more first downs than did the
great Iowa team last week.
Mental influence played a large part
in the Michigan victory at Columbus
last week also. Every man who went
into the game from the east sideline
went in with that one idea, conceiv-
ed in three consecutive defeats at the
hands of Ohio and fostered by the
coaches since last April, "Beat Ohio".
Spirits High, Fight Hard
Never did a football team fight with
such intensity of purpose and concen-
tration on the business in hand. It

was a different feeling from that
which drove the Illinois, however.I
The latter was making the last fight-
ing stand of desperation. Michigan
was on a foreign field for victory and
t wnila nnf ho rin in

low tlie point attained in the victory.
This was the case with Iowa last
week after her win at New Haven;
Chicago suffered the same fate last
year when after licking Princeton de-
cisively she succumbed to Ohio State
in her next game. If this is not the
case with Michigan today then the
coaches are miracle men.
(Continued on page 6)

Will Lead Indians
AgainstYosmen

RHEGENTS ANNO
CREATIO'N 'OF
JOHN S. WORLEY APPOl
CHAIR IN TRANSPORT
DEPARTMENT

POSTI
NTED 'TO
ATION

HAS REPUTATION AS
AUTHORITY IN FIELD
Leaves Highly Remunerative Position
to Accept Offer; Many Degrees
Granted
Creation of a chair of transporta-
tion engineering and appointment of
John S. Worley, manager of the Hab-
ieshaw Electric Cable company, to fill
the position was announded yesterday
by the Board of Regents at their
monthly meeting.
Worley has 'been recommended to
the University as one of the ablest
transportation engineers in the coun-
try today, and in coming to Ann Ar-
bor, it is understood that he sacri-
fices a far more remunerative posi-
tion for one in which he feels there
Is a greater opportunity for accom-
plishment.
Is Considered Expert
Born in Missouri in 1876, and edu-
cated at the University of Missouri
and the University of Kansas, Worley
has had a consistent and rapid, if not
spectacular, rise to the position of
prominence he occupies in the engi-
neering world. Since 1904, the year
in which he received his master of
master of science degree from the
University of Kansas, Worley has oc-
cupied many positions of responsi-
bility. He has worked as assistant.
engineer on construction on the St.
Louis and Northern Arkansas rail-
way, as principal assistant engineer
for the firm of Riggs and Sherman of
Toledo, as senior member of the Kan-
sas City firm of Worley and Blatch, as
consulting engineer for the Interstate
Commerce commission, and as manag-
er of the large electric cable company
with which he is now connected. He
is a member of Sigma Xi, Tau Beta
Pi and the Sigma Chi fraternity.
The Regents also authorized the vo-
cational education department to ad-
mit students not desiring University
credits without fees to courses on the
campus. It was decided to start a
course of instruction in the depart-
ment of electrical engineering for-
public utility employees. Prof. Hu-
go P. Thieme of the French depart
ment,- was granted a year's leave of
absence for study abroad during the
1923-1924 University year.
Grant Degrees -
The following degrees were grante
by the Regents: In the graduated
school: master of science in chemis-
try, Clarence N. Ferguson; master of
landscape design, Franz A. Aust;,
master. of arts in municipal admin-,
(Continued on Page Eight)
FERRIS WILL TALK
AT WHITNEY TODAY
Woodridge N. Ferris, ex-governor
of Michigan, and democratic candidate
for the United States senate, will
speak at eight o'clock this evening at
the Whitney theatre. G. Masselink.
vice-president of Ferris institute, will
also speak at the democratic rally.
Preceeding the meeting, at the
Whitney, the "Ferris for Senator"
club will give a banquet in honor of
ex-governor Ferris at six o'clock in
the Union. At this hanquet, given by
hha c-irn - x.1,,1. 11 L .. .... . ,_

PEP MEETING SETS
$ TAGE FOR OPENING
BIG TEN HOME TIL'

caine upon the stage in Hill auditor-
ium, faced an audience o; over
5,000 shouting Michigan men and' wo-
men, and, holding Uip the football won
in the Ohio State game, announced
"I've brought hore the bacon". From
the first notes of "The Victors" to the
last echoes of "The Yellow and Blue',
the huge throng was in state of wild-
est excitement as, spurred on by yells
led by Cheerleader William Frank-
hauser, '22L, they-clamored for a vic-
tory over the Indians in this after-
noon's combat on Ferry flild.
The meeting was presi'd over by
John W. Kelly, '24L, whl iltroduced
the first speaker, Asssitant Prof. Carl
Brandt,, of the department of public
speaking. Brandt scored with' the
audience by' declaring that Michigan
has this year "the fightingest team in
her history" and that coach Yost is
"the greatest coach in football his-
tory". He urged the student body to
beware of overconfidence In spite of
the great victoy over Ohio State last
week, and, though he predicted a sim-
serted that school spirit was nothing
if it did not support the team in ad-
versity.
Clancy Lauds Players
Robert Clancy, '09, formerly char-
man of theAlumni Athletic commit-
tee, described the; work of 'the Alum-'
ni in rehabiliating Michigan's foo-
ball team after the disastrous season
of 1919. He gave many interesting
remarks on the various members of
the football team, especially Kipke
and Roby. He paid tribute toRoby
and VanderVoort who made the"ao-
.preme sacrifice" in the, Ohio State
game, defining true Michigan spirit
as the spirit shown' by these men.
James I. Mclintock, '21L, addressed
the meeting briefly, sketching Michi-
gan 's gradual improvement in foot-
ball in the last few years, and stat-
ing that 1922 is to be one of the big
years in Michigan footall annas.,
At this point Coach Yost entered azd
the audience spontaneously rose to its
feet with a ,roar Hof acclamation', Te
Coach's speech was short and to the
point, being delivered with his char-
acteristic vigor Walkingstrenuous-
ly up and down the platform, drivA g .,
home his points with Roosevetian in-
cisiveness, he imparted his enthusi-
asm to the crowd which punctuated
his words by frequent bursts of ap-
plause.
"Ohio loodooon"
Yost spoke first of the spirit shown
by the team at Ohio State where they
were "absolutely unb'eatable" "Never
in my 30 years experience have I seen
a football team keyed up to such a
high pitch of enthusiasm as the Mich-
igan squad w s at Columbl.s last
week,"he declared. He asserted his
belief that the Ohio State battle was
one of the greatest games .in the
history of Michigan football. "We,
have now removed the Ohio State
hoodoo, if, such a thing ever really
existed," he declared.
The principle points made by the
coach in his talk were that betting
on games must be discouraged ifg
(Continued on Page Eight)
WATCH FOR IT!
( Immediately after the players
1 have entered the field house and I
the crowds are beginning to }
leave Ferry field, The Dkaily foot- I

f

i
, I
i

STUDENT OVATION GREETS YOST
IN ANTE.BELLUIW MASS
ASSEMBLY
COACH TALKS AGAINST
OVERCONFIDENCE HERE
Clancy, '09, Pays Tribute to Injured
Players; Stresses Strength of
)nemy's Squad
"Michigan's Grand Old Man", Field-
ing H. Yost, received the greatest ova-
tion of his career last night when he

Girls' Ge t'h b to Hold Tryouts
Tryouts tor F shman Girls' Glee
'lnh wPi a l r't .k The elinh

For all out-of-town cars, 10
acres south of Ferry field pro-
vided for parking of cars.
No parking within one block
of Ferry field.
Parking prohibited on State

ball extra with play-by-play I
reports of the game, will be on
sale at the gates,
The extra, in addition to the I
play-by-play reports, will also I
contain pictures of the stars of I
both teams, scores of other bat-
tles in Big Ten circles and of j
the more important games in I
th T4nC+ nnA Tm V+i

II

I

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