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October 26, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO MEN UPON WHOM ZUPPKE CANE
DEPEND TO FIGHT F OR ILLINOIS'

J SC HEL

J

ain another Saturday will test. That, however, does not meanI
, and with it will come the that there will not be a lot of fight
disnlaved asn ab n,.f -tthe onl ythinc

weekly battles on many gridirons
throughout the country, games that
are rapidly working toward the cli-
max of football schedules and that
may bring with them expected vic-
tory or unlooked for defeat.
Ohio State, fallen before Michigan's
savage attack, will attempt to regain
lost prestige against Minnesota at
Minneapolis. Everything points to an
Ohio victory. The Gophers, although
outplaying Northwestern, were held
to a tie by the Purple fight that so
nearly upset .Chicago. Ohio, too, has
that same inexplicable fighting quali-
ty as was splendidly demonstrated by
its brave but hopeless stand against
Michigan's superiority. Minnesota's
eleven is largely composed of veter-
ans, while the Buckeye team is green,
but Wilce's men using ilce's strate-
egy and Ohio fight should dominate.
Purdue Plays ;Iowa
Purdue will carry her hopeless
march against Iowa to Iowa City.
True, the Hawkeyes were expected to
mop the field with Illinois last Sat-
urday and the Illini did the unexpect-
ed by demonstrating their possession
of a truly powerful team, but Purdue
failed to make even a fairly satisfac-
tory showing against Chicago's sec-
ond string men and lost 20 to 0.
Things db not look optimistic for the
Boilermakers.
Indiana plays a non-Conference
team in clashing with the Michigan
Aggies at Bloomington. It should be
a victory for the Big Ten representa-
tives. The Farmers have shown little
prowess all season sand, while the
Hoosiers showing has been anything
but commendable their weakness has
been less pronounced than that of
the Green. Northwestern and Wis-
consin, the two remaining Big Ten
teams are slated for well earned
rests.
In the east there are two games of
more than ordinary interest. The big-
gest of these will take place at Newj
Haven when Yale meets the Army.
The game will be a battle from the
first 'blow of the whistle. Neither
team may be expected to cut loose,
the Soldiers saving their pet stunts
for the Navy and the Blue keeping
strings tight for the Harvard con-

, y r , UU;b onl y lng
held back will be trick plays. The
Army should win by a close score.
The Middies from Annapolis are like-C
wise favored against Pennsylvania
when the two teams clash on Franklin
field.
One Big Coast Game
Dartmouth, with her first real op-
portunity to defeat Harvard in many
a year, comes down from Hanover
set to conquor the Crimson. It is
doubtful that the wearers of the
Green will succeed, but it will be a
tough sort of a tussle. Pittsburgh
plays Bucknell in the only other
game of importance in the East.
On the Pacific coast the chief at-
traction will be the big affair in LosI
Angeles between the respective Uni-
I versities of California and Southern
California. The Trojans are repre-
sented by a real team this year hav-
ing swept Nevada and Arizona before
them and are awaiting the famed at-
tack of the Bears with real hopes,j
hopes that the Blue and Old Gold
seems certain to blast. Stanford
journeys northward to meet the Ore-
gon Aggies at Corvallis in a game
that seems to favor the Cardinal.
Other Pacific coast games are Wash-
ington vs. Washington State at Pull-
man, Idaho vs. Oregon at "Portland,
New Mexico Aggies vs. St. Mary's at
Oakland, and Arizona vs. Santa Clara
at San Francisco.3
Intramurald Itms
(Continued from Page Six)
The winner will probably meet Hart-'
well and McKnight for the champion-
ship.
The speedball schedule for today is
as follows: Three-thirty o'clock-
Alpha Delta Phi vs. Sigma Phi Epsi-
Ion. Cygnus vs. Phi Kappa Sigma.
The Intramural office requests all
who are interested in handling the
class speedball teams in the forthcom-
ing interclass speedball tournament
to get a list of their players and re-
port to the Intramural office before
Friday evening.

Intramual Dep't.
Plans Big Season
(Continued from Page Six)
that its success is only a matter of
getting the men together to play the
game.
Class sports are to be run through-
out the year, football or indoor bask-
etball following immediately after the
speedball closes.
Sweaters are to be awarded to the
winners of the different sports. They
will be of the same color as the win-
ners' class colors.
Any man ,can get a sweater this
year if he will come out and work for
it. The way that this may be accom-
plished is through the new point sys-

ramnural department.
Under this system the player must
come to the Intramural department
and give in his name at the same time
signifying that he wishes to get a let-
er through this plan. As he plays in
each contest he will he given so many
points which are to be governed by
whether the team wins or loses. Re-
gardless of the outcome of*the affair
however, he will receive credit for it
and as soon as the number of neces-
sary points are obtained the Intra-)
mural officials will present him with
a sweater with his class numerals on'
'.
All men that go out for class ath-
letics must undergo a short prelim-
inary course of training under the In-
tramural trainer, Ted Sullivan, so that

MILL A J
M-E1"mT

FN

SHORTHAND
Beginning Class - October 30
HAMILTON
BUSINESS COLLEGE
State and William Streets

Bunny Oaks, star tackle for the
Suckers who will start against the
Wolverines.
VARSITY SECONDSAN
RESERVES KAVE' TILT
Terrific line plunging, intense spir-
it and consistent fighting were out-
standing features of the secret scrim-
mage last night between the varsity
seconds and the Reserves. From the
standpoint of necessary efforts ev-
ery man gave all that was in him and
the Reserves nearly scored ,a victory,
the score being 7-6 in favor of the
Varsity at the end of the mixup.
"Red" Miller was back in the line-
up for the Reserves and ripped many
a hole in the Varsity line for sub-
stantial gains despite the efforts of
Coach Little to get the Varsity to
stop him. He was not bothered with
his knee and was a hard problem for
the opposing players both on the de-
fense and offense.
Lawson crashed through with his
usual amount of hard work and pass-
ed the ends for good gains a few
times. It was largely Lawson's and
Miller's work that helped the Re-
serves to take the ball from their 40
yard line to the goal for their lone
touchdown.
- I

Pt stoic
who holds down one of

ti

Pat Stoic,

the half
team.

back positions on the Sucker

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AT SMOKE DRINK a
REST AND PLAY
.11 Mihgan men are In-
ected to make use of,
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Domestic Wool Hose, 75c
Imported Wool Hose, 8 c up
Knitted Waist Coats, $6.50
Camel-hair Sweaters, $io up
Townes Gloves, $2.50 up
Knitted Wool Globes,' $z up
Knitted Mu flers,' $2 up
Burberry 's English Ulsters, $75
Domestic Obercoais, $40 up
"N" Blankes,'$ t

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W' L

' , :
,_

LTARDS CIGAS CANDIES
yPES LUNCHES SODAS.
W~e 'try to treat you rijht"

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321 stgy s& 5

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mu u.s 533K .53 mJ

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WON
.. . .. . .. . .. . .. .. . .. . ..

THiSSI TaIS
COLUMN COLUMN
CLOSES CLOSES
AT 3 P.M. ADVERTISING AT 3 P.M.

FALL SPORTS
or indulge in any
athletic sport,
r Spalding implements
r give most satisfaction.
If It's Spalding's
It's Right
Send for Catalogue
211 So. State St., Chicago, Ill.

H ERE are 'magazines for people who are interested
in golf, gossip, stock-gambling, politics, travel ;for
people who want to be amused with sea stories,
western stories, funny stories, love stories ; for people who
like bathing girls, chorus girls, society girls ; there are several
-magazines for people who Want to be bored.

m

"U"

MICHIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per word a day, paid in advance. Min-
imum charge for first day, 25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. Three
cents per word per day if charged. White space charged for at rate
of 5c per agate line. Classified, charged only to those having phones.
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advance.
PHONE 960

The Dial

!'

II Ii

f

MISCELLANEOUS
PARTY WHO TOOK ring and money
from gymnasium locker 616 was
seen and will avoid trouble by re-
turning to Junior Clark, 433 Hamil-
ton Place. No questions asked.
Phone 2397-Ml. 28
SPANISH INSTRUCTOR will teach
Spanish in exchange for assistance
in English. Ask for P. ). 3:00 to.
5:00 p. m. 513 E. Williams, or ask
Perry Hayden at Michigan Daily.'
28-2
;CARS WASHED and repaired, work
guaranteed. Hupmobile Sales and
Service. 202 E. Wa hington, Phone
2964-W. 26-21
WILL THE PERSON who took a gab-
erdine coat and left another in low-
er coat room of Union please call
719-W. 28
E. NORMANTON BILBIE, teacher of
violin, piano, and harmony. Studio,
307 N. Main St. Tel. 611-M. 1-30
LOCKSMITH, all kinds of door and
trunk keys, phone 2498. Dell Kel-
ler. 27-6
HOME BOARD $5.00 a week for two
meals. Phone 1207-J. 27-2
FOR HIRE-Ford touring car, by
hour or trip. Phone 1758-R. 28-21
LOST
LOST-Lower part of gold fountain
pen on south University. Initials
Z. T. T. Reward if returned to 1328,
Washtena'w. 27-2
LOST-Grey overcoat at Ann Arbor
depot Sunday. , Reward for return
to 332 E. Madison St. 28
LOST-Money at or near Majestic
Saturday afternoon. Call 1565-J
for reward.. 26-3
LOST--Pair of dark tortoise shell
glasses about one week ago. Phone
465. 27-2
LOST-Old fashioned round gold pin
set with two amethysts. Call 2594-
M, 28
LOST--Ring with topaz set. Finder
please call 3041-W. 28-3
FOR RENT

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-A piano in good condi-
tion, reasonable. Call for Mrs. Bar-
- nard at 433 S. Division. 28-2
FOR RENT-Desirable room for two
students. $2.50 each. Very private.
Phone 251-M. 27-3
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-1915 Studebaker 6"
touring, $165.00; one Ford touring;
$70.00: These cars are in good run-
ning condition. Phone 1170-M. 920
E. Washington. 28
FOR SALE-Ford Roadster in perfect
condition. Starter, cord tires and
demountable rims. Bargain for
cash. Call 1212-3. 27-2
FOR SALE-Special speedster job,j
Fordl motor, wire wheels, natural
finish mahogany body. Call T. Os-
ius. Phone 909. 28
FOR SALE-E-flat alto Saxophone,
finish B, with case. Slightly used
and in good condition. Call 434-R.
27-21
FOR' SALE-Monarch typewriter in
good condition, $25.00. Phone
1786-W. 28
FOR SALE-Sweet Cider. Bring your
jug. Chas. Klager, 617 S. Main St.
10-25
FOR SALE-New Dictaphone com-
plete. Call 661-W.. 27-3
WANTED
WANTED-Family or bundle wash-
ings. Student work our specialty.
All hand work. $5.00 worth of,
work for $4.50. Our work is right,
if not, we make it right. Work call-
ed for and delivered. "Service" is
I our motto. Draper Home Laundry
Phone 3106-F2. 632 S. Ashley St.
27-21
IWANTED-Boarders, Cilley's Dining
Rooms reopened at 520 Packard St.
$5.00 and $6.00 per week. Telephone
2845-R. 26-31
WANTED-Two tickets to IllinoisI
game in north or south stands. Call
Nichols, 1049-W from 2 to 5. 27-2
WANTED-To rent, two unfurnished
rooms, cooking facilities preferred.'
Box E F G, Daily. 28

MEN'S
HIGH

will either delight you or excite you -it certainly
will not bore you, It is not just "another magazine,""
but the only journal in America devoted exclusively
to art and literature, to beauty and ideas. These
things are not decorative additions to life, but are
the deepest satisfaction of all intelligent or sensitive
persons. If your college career has made you
appreciative of beauty and ideas you will like THE
DIAL if not, you will probably read a copy, smile
archly and ask--

0

CUT

SHOES

PATRICK

CORD
COATS

CLOTH
CRAFT

HIGHBROW? If refusal to compromise with the popular and
semi-popular constitutes "'highbrowism," then we admit the
accusation.
QUEER ? Yes, if by queer you mean the constant doing of things
other magazines never think of.
DULL ? Certainly, if your standard of values is based on the appre-
ciation of Snappy Stories and Telling Tales, (
MORBID ? Perhaps, that depends-all of our stories certainly do
not have happy endings.
DEGENERATE? Possibly-but wouldn't you like to be asso-
ciated with the following company of degenerates, all of whom
contribute to T.HE DIAL: Sherwood Anderson, Johan Bojer,
FRobert Bridges, Van Wyck Brooks, Joseph Conrad, T. S. Eliot,
Thomas Hardy, Vachel Lindsay, Robert Morss Lovett, Amy
Lowell, George Moore, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Romain-
Rolland, Bertrand Russell, Carl Sandburg, G. Santayana, May
Sinclair, James Stephens, Arthur Symons, William Butler Yeats.
EROTIC ? Well, we never have upheld the genteel tradition in
American letters, and we do publish frequently the work of
D. H. LAWRENCE, EZRA PouN, ,ARTHUR SCHNITZLER, and
F JAMES JOYCE.:
Caviar to rthefarticular
THE DIALis not satisfied with being-caviar-to the
general -it is caviar. to the- particular. Its sole'
purpose is to bring the work of the artists whocount
to the people : who care.4 It is publishing, both in
traditional and unconventional forms, and by known
-and unknown men and women, the art and the litera-
ture by which our generation, here and abroad, will
be remembered by future generations. Each month'
the significant works of. the creative minds of the'
world, in fiction; poetrythe essay, and the graphic
and plastic arts, appear in its pages. -In addition, it
affords a complete critical survey of; books, music, *
art, and the theatre -in' short, a compte rendu of
what the intelligent world is doing and thinking.

THE DIAL will publish, in its issuesfrom{October to March
MANY MARRIAGES
a new novel by
Sherwood Anderson
Mr Anderson- is the most interesting and important figure in
contemporary American letters. Since his arrival six years
ago, Mr Anderson has published six books, each of which
has marked a distinct growth in this development. * His latest
work to be published in book form is The Triumph of the,
Egg, a collection of his- best short stories. This was probably
the most seriously discussed book of the past year.
MANY MARRIAGES, his latest novel, both in theme and
treatment, stands far- apart from the run of novels dealing
with the American scene., The confident belief held by
American and foreign critics in Mr Anderson's future will
be justified by 'this new novel, for in it4 he has gone. farther
than in any previous work in the full development of his
art. A man living in a small town in the State of Wis-
consin is the central character of this significant work. It is
the story of the love and marriage of a man, told as the man
understands it on the decisive night when the marriage
comes to an end. The intensity of emotion and the richness
of imagination are equally remarkable. .This novel marks
a distinct break from the methods of photographic realism
so much in vogue among writers of the middle west. It is
the most important work that Mr Anderson has produced
so far, and is certain to be acclaimed by the discriminating
as a permanent contribution to American letters.
THE DIAL wishes to assure the admirers of .Mr Anderson's
work that -Many Marriages surpasses anything he has pre-
viously written. It is probable that this: novel will be the
literary sensation of the coming season. We feel certain
that you wilt not want to miss this fine work.,
Special~ Student, and. Faculty 'Offer!
If you will sign this coupon and return"to THE DIAL within ten
days, we will make a special subscription rate.of $3.50 for a
year (regular yearly subscription rate is $5.oo)
OR
'we will make you a special subscription rate
pf $3.oo and for an additional $2.oo send
you a copy of Sinclair Lewis' new novel-
Babbitt-both for- $5.oo the cost
of THE DIAL alone for a year.]
' THE DIAL
II
152 West 13th Street, New.York City
Gentlemen : You may enter my name for a year's subscrip-
tion to THE DIAL, under the terms of your special offer.
R. f..w... ............., . ..r.arbt. ....................

CLOTH ES

AT

HAGEN'S

OUT OF THE
HIGH REUT DISTRICT

i

dare

"ou: One of the" Particular

-the coupon opposite is the answer.-Or if you are
cautious the October issue may be had at the nearest
newsstand or the Student Book Store.'

FOR RENT-Comfortable pleasant

WANTED_ Two tickets for I1'. not s 4

1 215-217

NorE : THE DIAL would like to obtain the services of a number of students to

f

r

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