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October 24, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I HE-tdW rA-\ 1 rLKS
PROBABLY R.1I\ AND
COL DER

I

4

A4VA6

47

r

VOL; XXXIII. No. EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1922 EIGHT PAGES |2 y

PRICE FIVE CE

NTE-D JOURNALIS CT
NERWILL SPEAK R
niTOMOROW NIGHTI

Aged Campaigner
Miller Supporter
In N. Y. Election

GOV. GR OESBECK
TELEGRAPHS YOST

r
i

ISSAC F. MARCOSSON TO DELIVER
LECTURE IN HILL AUD.
AT 8 O'CLOCK
WILL TAKE AS SUBJECT
"THE CHANGING EAST"s
Will Also Appear at Informal Meeting
of Student Press Club at
9:30 O'clock
Isaac F. Marcosson distinguished
American journalist, author and lec-
turer, will deliver the third number
of University Oratorical association
series when he speaks at 8 o'clock to-
morrow night in Hill auditorium. Mr.
Marcosson is just returning from
Asia, where he has'gathered abundant
material which will enrich his lec-
ture which he is to give here on "The
Changing East." He had, during hs
eventful five months in Japan and
China, many adventures in the Chi-
nese Civil War. His mission there
was to study the economic and po-
litical consequences of the Washing-
ton Conference. This work, accord-
ing to Mr. Marcosson, has proved to
be the most exciting of his many world
experieices. He was the first jour-
nalist to be received in private audi-
ence in Japan by the Prince Regent,
and he was also the first foreigner to
address the Japanese House of Peers.
Finds China Interesting
The trip to China was no less in-
teresting, for there he was received
by Shu-Shih'-Chang, the. retirjng pres-
ident, by Li-Yuanhung, the new presi-
dent, and also by Sun-Yat-Sen, until
lately president of Southern China.
In both countries he also met practi-
cally every outstanding political and
military personage and was the guest
of Marshal Chang Tso-lin, the Man-
churian War Lord at Mukden. He saw
the Civil War on botlP the Northern
and Southern fronts.
His past work has been quite as
significant as his most recent accord-
ing to authorities in the field of jour-
nalism and politics. For more .thanI
10 years his articles have appeared
in the leading periodicals, particular-
ly in the Satti'dayl Evening Post:
During the mores recent years Mr.
Marcosson has become widely known;
as the greatest living 'interviewer of
celebrities, many of whom he has de-?
scribed in his autibiography, "Ad-,
ventures in Interviewing." While he
was acting as correspondent during
the war he won the title of "Ameri-
ca's Foremost Reporter," having been
on all the fronts, and having seen
more phases and met more leaders
of the titanic 'struggle than any of his
contemporaries.
Resumes Travels After War
Wth the advent of peace he has re.
sumed his travels. After the signing
of the Armistice he has been many
times in every European country and!
also journeyed to Africa, where he
saw General Smutsw AtCapetown and
then covered the whole of Rhodesia
and the Belgian Congo, adding a,
unique experience to his long list1
of adventures. Before his trip to the:
East, he had one of the most fruit-

Goernor Groesbeck who was
unable to attend the game Sat-
urday because of press of busi.
ness sent Coach Yost a telegram
of encouragement and support.
The telegram read as follows:
Fielding R. Yost,.
Michigan football headquarters,
Coliunbus, 0.
Keenly regret impossibility of
joining you today but want to as-
sure you of our deep interest and
ferv ent hope that victory will be
yours. P13ease say to your boys
for me that Michigan is proud of
them and that we are all pulling
hard. In the name of the people
of your state I bid you Godspeed.
Alex J. Groesbeek,
Governor.

f[WILL MAIL ILL I N I 'Aged Doorkeeper
'I ICKETS TOMORROW Ran Erands For
Ferry field will be filled to capacity Charles Dickens
at the Michigan-Illinois football game "
next Saturday, according to H. A. Til-'
jllotson, of the Athletic office, who
stated yesterday that there were only
3,000 tickets of the 40,00, remaing and
these were expected to be gone by
BONAR LAW IS FIRST NATIVE Wednesday night.
CANADIAN TO hEAD Maiting of student tickets will take a
GOVERNMENT place not later than Wednesday nightMM
Tillotson said, enabling the students
CABINET LIST ALREADY torecei e their seats on either the
PRACTCALL COMPE~'EThursday or Friday befor e the game.
PRAC'TICALLY COMPLETE
Conservative Party in Power Again
For First Time Since CK
.A190A f-f
AD[ A l i M P 0 T

IOINIST ORENS
"LC.
ANNUAL C HORA
UNIONSERIE
IFTSCHA ELMAN WILL GIVE FIR
CONCERT TONIGHT IN HILL
AU DITORIUM
M A D E APPEARANCE
HERE FIVE YEARS A(

fl

Artist Has
World

Maintained Place in
Among Many Risk
Celebrities

Mrs, Gerrit SMuil Glen
Mrs. Gerrit Smith Glen is seventy-.I
six. She cut her political eyeteeth back
in '54 when she campaigned in the1
Dayton-Fremont ballot Ibattfle. She
will campaign actively for Gov. Nath-
a-n Miller in the New York guberna-
torial race.
STATE DEPARITMENT
Asks Five Central Anierican Republies
to Send Envoys to
Washington
EXPECT 11EW TREATY WILL
REGULATE MUTUAL AFFAIRS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 23.-The United
States has invited the governments
of Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras,:
Salvador, and Costa Rica to send
plenipotentiaries to a conference in:
Washington beginning Dec. 4 for a
discussion of measures looking to the
well being of Central America, the re-
sults thereof to be embodied in .4
treaty for the permanent regulation
of their ,'mutual interests and rela-
tions.
The state department, in making
American legations at the capitals of
this announcement tonight, said the
the five Central American republics
were instructed on Oct. 21 to extend
to the presidents of these countrie
invitations to the conference.

STONE 1ILSPA
Former .%ssociated Press Head to Talk
on "The School o .Journal-
ism"
TICKETS FOR SUPPER ARE
NOW ON SALE AT GRAHAM'S
Complete preparations for the Mel-
ville E. Stone banquet to be given in.
the assembly hall of the Union Thurs-
day evening by Sigma Delta Chi, pro-
fessional journalistic fraternity, have
been made. The banquet will form a
part of the program which the Uni-
versity Press club of Michigan dele-
gates will hold at their convention,
Oct. 26-28, in Ann Arbor.
"The School of Journalism" is the
subject on which Mr. Stone will speak
at the banquet. Dean John R. Effinger,
of the literary college, will deliver
the address of welcome, while Coach
Fielding H- Yost will speak on "The
Team with a Purpose.".
Tickets for the banquet, which will
cost $175 each, are now on sale at
Graham's bookstore. They may also
be purchased from any one of the fol-
lowing committeemen in charge of the
sale Robert B. Tarr, '24, Ralph N.
Byers, '24, and Martin A. Klaver, '23.
Melville Elijah Stone, in honor of
whom the banquet is given, was grad-1
uated from high school at Chicago in
1867, and from Ohio Wesleyan univer-
sity later with a Doctor of Laws de-
gree. He began his career as a report-.
er for the Chicago Tribune in 1864,'and
later served as editor on several of the
Chicago dailies. He became a partner
of the Chicago Daily News in 1875,
and of the Chicago Morning News in
1881. He organized the Globe National
bank in 1891 of which he was he presi-
den until 1898. From 1893 until 1921
he served as general manager of the
Associated Press, and since 1921 he
has served as its counselor-

- (By Associated Press)
Loidon, Oct. 23. - Andrew Bonar
Law today, in tlie' traditional phrase
of the court creular, "kissed hands
upon his appointment as prime min-
ister anld first lord of' the treasury,"
and thus becomes England's first Ca-
nadian born premier.
Today was devoted to the formali-
ties necessary in a monarchical coun-
try to a change in the government.
The king in the morning gave an audi-
ence to and took formal leave of the
outgoing prime minister, Mr. LIoyd'
George. Then came the Unionist
meeting in the afternoon, when Mr.
Bonar Law was unanimously elected
leader of the party. This was follow-
ed by an audience. at Buckingham
palace, when Mr. Bonar Law, at the
king's invitation, undertook to form a
new administration.
Ills Cabinet Comiplete
Mr. Bonar Law's- election enables
him to accepts-the task-of forming.a
cabinet, thereby giving England her
first Conservative prime minister
since 1905. It is understood his min-
istry is virtually complete.
Mr. Bonar Law in his speech ex-
pressed the hope that .those Cialitlon
Unionists who had voted, against the
resolution passed by the Carlton club-
meeting last week for a return to
party independence woild join their
Unionist brothers and. go to' the coun-
try as a united party. The meeting
voted thanks to Austen Chamberlain,
the retiring leader, for his services.
Mr. Bonar Law lost no time, but ar-
ranged' for an audience with King
George at'5:30 p. m.
T h e Premier-designate emerged'
from the meeting smiling broadly. He
readily consented to pose for the
photographers, while, a large crowd
cheered enthusiastically.
Lord Carson There
cOthers present at:the meeting in-
clided" Viscount Lord;" Derby, Lord
Carson, Viscount Peel, the Duke of
Devonshire, Earl Grey, Sir Samuel
Hoane, Admiral Sueter and William
Ormsby-G ore.
The presence of' Lord Carson cre-
ated considerable comment, adding
strength to the recent rumors that
the former Ulster Unionist leader in-
tended to re-enter politics. This would
necessitate his resignationas Lord of
Appeal, because holders of' judiciary
lordships cannot participate in poli-
tics.
Long before thehourfor the meet-
ing huge crowds gathered along the
Strand to watch the arrival of the:
notables. The crowds were as a rule
undemonstrative, but cheers were giv-
(Continued from Page Two)
i U
STUDENT SHOT VY OHIO,
OFFICER IN ARGUMENT
THEODORE C. REISSING, '24,
WOUNDED ON RETURN FROM
COLUMBUS

lintlL IIVUJI tbui~l

Only 1,000
shawn

Seats Remain For Deni.
Program on Thirsday
Evening

ORIENTAL DANCES FEATURED
ALONG WITH LEGEND NUMBER
More than 4,000 tickets have been
disposed of for the Denishawn Danc-
ers' concert Thursday night in Hill
auditorium, and but 1,000 remain un-
sold.
All seats for the'entertainment will
be reserved. A. D. Kirk, '23M, has]
been selected as head of the commit-
tee of ushers which will consist of 25
members. All committeemen .'will
wear Tuxedos for the concert.
RuthSt. Denis and Ted Shawn with
the Denishawn dancers will appear
here under the auspices of the Uni-
versity Glee clubs in a number of mu-
sic visualizations, in a dance basedj
upon an ancient Toltec legend, and
in a number of Oriental dances. Be-{
fore their late engagement at the!
Selwyn theater in New York, the ar-
tists spent five years in Europe and
in the Orient where they, played at
the largest theaters and where they
originated a large number of dances
some of which they will give here
Thursday evening.
One hundred tickets for the con-
cert have been reserved for the dele-
gates attending the University Pressf
Club of Michigan convention Oct. 26-1
28, in Ann Arbor by James C. Stevens~
23, business manager of the glee
club. Tickets for the concert will be
sold from 2 to 5 o'clock in the after-
noon today and tomorrow at the
booth in the main corridor of Univer-
sity hall. There will be a general sale
of tickets on the campus Thursday.
FOREIGN SHIPS MUST
DISCAN fiL LIUOR
- . 1
DAUGHERTY'S RULING CLOSES
LID ON ALL VESSELS
WITHIN LIMIT
Ships which left foerign ports for
the United States, after midnight Sat-
urday, must be devoid of wet goods
when coming within the three-mile
limit, according to General Daugher-
ty's interpretation of the prohibition
laws to the effect that they apply "to
American territory", and not merely to

Frdric~ederuit Edrpl
Fredericl E(rupt, s'venty-five, now
doorkeeper at the Middle Temple, Lon-
don, aindses tourists by telling them
of his experiences while working as
an office boy for Charles Dickens,
noted English author.
F . T
OFFICERH~S TODA9Y
Junior lits, Soph lit: and Freshman
Engineers Will Vote Upon
Noninees
SOPHOMORES TO MAKE GREEN 1
OR STEGER PRESIi)ENT
Elections for officers for three
classes will be held from 9 to 12 o'-
clock and from 1 to 3 o'clock today
in the respective buildings of the
classes. The junior and sophomore
lits will vote in University hall and
the freshman engineers will cast bal-
lot in the second floor corridor of the
Engineering building.
The junior lits selected the follow-
ing as nominees for offices: for pres-
ident, Hugh Duffield and Arch Gray;
for vice pres., Helen Delbridge and
Blanch Kynast; for secretary, Susan
Fitch and Dorothy Maitland; and for.
treasurer, Robert Mitchell and Rob-
ert Young.
The sophomore lits announce the
following as candidates for offices:
for president, Milton Green and Herb p
ert Steger; for vice president, Jeanne
Briggs and Edna Katow; for secre-
tary, Margaret Hays and Alice Powell;
and for treasurer, Ray Billington and.
Morris Reed.
Freshmen engineers seleced for

Mischa Elman, the celebrated Ru
sian violin virtuoso , will open t
Choral Union concert series at 8
glock tonight in Hill auditorium. D'
ing the five years which have elaps
since his last appearance in Ann. A
bor, Elman has won many laure
and, in spite of the large number
virtuosi who have recently obtain
prominence, his position as one of'
the greatest violinists in the world
mains unchallenged.
The following program is annou
ed:
Sonata in D major.........Han
Adagio
Allegro
Larghetto
Allegro
Symphonie Espagnolie ..........Lz
Allegro
Aandante
Rondo
Suite "Much Ado 'About Nothing..
..............Korng
Maid inBridal Array
Grotesque Funeral
Garden Scene
Hornpipe
Nocturne..........Ch'opin-Wilhe:
Jota .................Saras
The Handel sonata is one of the f
est violin compositions in existen
This, andthe sonatas in E major a
A major, are about the only vik
works of the composer whicha
now heard much. The work is f
from the intricacies of modern vic
compositions, possessing the bread
of conception and nobility of style
characteristic of the composer. T
work is a favorite with violinists
cause of the fine opportunities
tone exhibition which it affords.
The Spanish Symphony of Edou:
Lalo was first performed. by Sarasa
February 7, 1875. Only three of
five movements will be given by
man. It is a work which makes
vere demands upon the artist if an
equate interpretation is to be rend
ed.
Erich Von Korngold is the you
Germa'n composer whose opera, "T
Dead City" made such a favorable :
pression when given a the Metrop
tan last winter with Jeritza. '
composition on the Elman progran
his opus 11. As might be inferred fr
the title, the work - is based
Shakespeare's comedy. Fritz Kre
1er performed the -suite in 1920, a
the Frieds of Music also gave.a i
formance at that time with an' orchi
tra under the baton of Arthur
danzky. It is reported that Korng

YOST INTRIWIN
-NOVEMBER ARIN

President
Pleased
State

Burton
With Ohio
Hospitality

ful of experiences, being received by "How To Play Your Ganie" is the
King Albert, Clemenceau, Lloyd George title of an interview with Coach Field-
Cardinal Mercier, Admiral Horthy, Re- ing H. Yost published in the'Amen-
genet of Hungary, President Hinisch can magazine for November. The in-
of Austria, Hugo Stinnes and Chan- terview was written by Allen Hard-
cellor Wirth of Germany,' ng, and in it Coach Yost tells some
As Professor Trueblood, has pointed of the things that have made Mich-
out, not only is Mr. Marcosson a the things th e Michi-
great journalist, a popular writer and gan football history in the 22 years
the world's foremost interviewer, butfththe has been in charge of the
he has also the distinction of being a sport at the school.
forceful and eloquent speaker. The Chief of the qualities that make a'
last three years havesfound him good football player is the !spirit
earning the reputation of a brilliant that wins" in the opinion of the
speaker on the lecture platform, where coach as cited. The effects of this
his appearance at Carnegie Hall, New spirit as Yost has seen it, both in
York, last year, and again this sea-' Michigan teams and in those that
son have attracted ruecord-breaking have faced Michigan, and in the men
audiences. Reports of his lectures themselves are described.
were cabled to all parts of the En,- Second only to the spirit that wins
lish-speaking world. and nearly as essential in the win-
State Editors Invited ning of games, is the moral courage
The Oratorical association believes that makes men keep: on when they,
this lecture will stand as the best of are done, in the opinion of the coach.
those given on its program so far. By moral courage the coach says' that
both from the standpoint of the man he does not mean the courage to do
who is to speak and the message he what is right but the greater thing
has to deliver. that makes men have the power to do
The Oratorical association has in- things that they would not dare to
vited all of the editors of the Michi- do under other conditions. Coming in
gan State Press association who will' from behind, when the score is
be in Ann Arbor attending their an- against you or when you are fighting
nual convention to attend 'the lecture. with h fitor ar the ex:.

In speaking of his trip down to Co-
lumbus President Marion L. Burton
voiced the sentiments of all the Mich-,
igan visitors at the big game with
Ohio State, namely that the hospital-
ity that was extended by the Buck-
eyes was fine and well worthy of
commendation.
"The Buckeyes were well organiz-
ed and had made plans ahead so that
their guests could be well taken care
of. Their welcome was given pains-
taking attention, and the sportsman-
ship of the supporters of the Buck-
eyes was likewise commendable,"
c 4WL.n'~r crl n

I

dry land, which became active at their nominees: for president, Wil- had Elman in inind wnen wrmtmi
12:01 Sunday morning. liam Coleman and William Mathie- composition.
Nine ship companies have obtained son; for vice president, Harry 'Ac- Tickets for the Elman conce
temporary injunctions enabling their Duff, and Paul 'Keller; for secretary, completely isold out, accord'
ships to enter American ports ,with W. ?f. Tippy and Francis O'Brien. Charles A. Sink, secretary of th
the intoxicating liquors sealed, and and for tIreasurer, Robert James and versity School of Music. Thos
now are trying to get permanent. in- Nelson Phelps. ; wish to attend, however, may st
junctions to the same purpose. They The elections were supposed to cure stage seats of which a 1
contend that Daugherty went beyond been held last Friday but owing to the number are on sale at $2.00 ea
what the authors of the various pro- general commotion and excitement
hibition measures intended, and if over the game on Saturday, the Stu
this is not uph-d y te endngde
cision, they will try to find out that elections ordered their postponemer
the acts themselves were illegal in unil today.
scope.-----------------------------

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said the Presilent- ! Theodore C. Reissing, '24, who was
At Columbus President Burton was . . .
a guest of President Thompson of 0. accidentally shot in the side last Sun-
S. U. and took part in the dedication day by a night watchman in Carey,
of Ohio's new stadium. Ohio, while returning from the Mich-
igan-Ohio State football game, is now
AT in the University hospital and was
reported yesterday to be improving.
The gun wound received, it was stat-
ed, was not serious, the bullet pass-
ing through the body and not punc-
turing the lung as was at first feared.
The shooting was the result of an
Charles E. Townsend, senior Unit- accident, it was stated. Reissing and
ed States senator from Michigan will 20 other students had been arrested
be the principal speaker at a Repub- by Andrew Greer, the village night-
lican banquet to be held at 6:30 watchman, for taking articles from a
o'clock tomorrow night in the ball restaurant for souvenirs. In at-
room of the Michigan Union. Other tempting to contol the students,
speakers for the evening will be Col. Greer, it was stated, raised his gun
C. E. Duff, secretary to Governor to strike Reissing, and it was acci-
Groesbeck, and Earl Michner, United dtary discharged. i
States congressman from this dis- tals probable that the University
trict, who will also be chairman ofmtikrble tatheUgis er
the banquet. may take legal action against Greer.
The meeting is being sponsored by' after investigation of the whole case.
? T~an rncnh B 'rla air tha ha

Ships of other companies come in- ; ROOMS Ii t I IE VISITURDAY
side the meaning of the law, and must IN N ____11 NT x SATRDAY
comply with the new restriction. It

Whimsies subscription campal

Mr. Marvossop will be given a re-!
ception and will give a short talk be-
fore the bi-monthly' meeting of the
Student Press club tomorrow night
immediately after his lecture in Hill
auditorium. The meeting will be held
in the reading room of the Union and
will probably begin at 9:30 o'clock.
Mr. Marcosson will speak on "Rem-
iniscences as an Interviewer." Be-
cause of his many experiences in this
field he is especially capable to ad-
dress the gathering of journalists.

wiL n110 anUCe UL VCry Ue LM X
amples cited by the coach.
The article also quotes Yost in des-j
criptions of some of the greater foot-
ball games that Michigan has played,
not from the standpoints of victories
but where the team has distinguished
itself in some unusual way. The Min-
nesota game of last year is one of'
the modern games cited by the
coach.
A brief history of the life of Coach
Yost together with a summary of the'
work that he has done for Michigan:

is probable that there will be no call More than 200 rooms will be need- the coining year will be launch
for the enforcement agents to act for ed to accomodate those who will visit the camnus tomorrow, from 9
several days, as the nearest ports of Ann Arbor Saturday to see the Michi- o'clock, according to announceme
regular call, excepting Bermuda, are gan-Illinois football game, according the editors, who state that the
several days sailing from New York. to Milton Ia. Green, '25, chairman ofpeCt to greatly enlarge the maga
the rooming committee in charge ofpctogralenreth ag
It was expected that the decision m circulation, not only among the
granting the temporary injunction to furnishing rooms for the football rsit
tesvrl semhp. games here with the University of Ili-vrity students but among the
the 'several . steamshipcompanies limois , wand the Universit y of Wiscon- school teachers and students o
would clear things up somewhat, but sin. U state interested in good ter
an appeal to the supreme court is ex- According to Green, approximately and among Michigan alumni.
the case concerning the granting of only 40 rooms have been listed with This is Whimsies' third year c
aseaesn sfingtheo uatm ofthecommittee. All housekeepers who campus as a purely literary n
a permanent injunction. can furnish rooms for visitors at-izine, devoted to poetry essays,
E LEAGUE CONDCTING tending either football game are ask- and short stories by students o
RUM(AGE, BRIC-A-BRAC SALE ed to list them at the Union. University. The Whimsies editor
---_be remembered for their effor
Michigan's Womans League is con- Student. Taknm: Army Exams bringing the series of eminent
cigan maneaeon, , . B. Nhl- to Ann Arbor last year, to lectur
ducting a rummage sale, the benefits son, '23E, and E. K. Ellis, '23L, suc der the auspices of the America
of which are to go to the Woman's cessfully passed the p eliminary Cx sociation of Univesity Women.
League Building fund. The league aminations for commissions as second cording to recent announcement
want any kind of old clothing, espe- lieutenants in the United States regu- the intention to present a simila
cially winter goods which are of no bar army last week- They are now ries during the coming winter,
value to their owners. taking the final examinations at For t composed principally of prose wr
It is requested that if any one has Wayne,'Mich. Whimsies is printed bi-montb

the Republican county committee of
this district of which Judge John D.
Thomas of Ann Arbor is general,
chairman and will be open to the
general public. Charles A. Sink, sec-
retary of the School of Music, has
charge of the entertainment program
and it is planned to have the Univer-

dean Joseph A. tursiey sad tnat ne
was looking into the matter and
would report the result of his inves-
tigation to President Marion L. Bur-
ton, who would be the one to start ac-
tion should such a course be found
to be advisable.

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