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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 22, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

's J11N6. UN I

nes

ias been postponed to Wed-
night, 9:30 p. m., when re-

NOTICE-Copy for this column should
be submitted by 5:30 o'clock of
the day before publication.
SUNDAY
9:30-Congregational students bible
classes.
9;0-University men's bible class"
meets in Upper Room, Lane Hall.,i
12:00-Open forum, Congregational,
church. Dr. W. E. Forsythe speaks
on the Historical Conception of Di-
seases.
12:00-Baptist Guild class meets in
,the Guild house across the street
from the Baptist church. '
12:00-Prof. W. D. Hendereon speaks
at the Presbyterian Church. Will
give his fourth talk of a series of
ten on "What We Know About the
New Testament."
5:30-Lutheran Student Forum, Zion
Lutheran Chapel. George Oscar Bo-
wen leads sing. Refreshments. Dis-
cussion.
5:80-Social Hour, Presbyterian
church, supper will be served.
6:30-Young PIeoples' Mi~eeting, Pres-
byterian Church. Leader Anna
Nelson, '25. "Subject: Reverence
and Worship. Why Go to ,Chu-rch?
.How to Observe the Sabbath.
6:00-BIaptist Guild social half hour at
Baptist church. Refreshments.
6:30-Baptist Guild evening meeting
led by E. G. Cochrane. Subject,
The Highest Good.
6:30-Dr. Harry P. Nichols of New
York city speaks on "Mountain
Climbing" at Harris Hall, following
supper.
6:30-IntercollegIate Zionists' associ.
ation meets in Lane Hall.
6:80-Student Fireside chat at Con-
gregational church. Floyd Cory,
'24, speaks on "The Creed of an
Athlete." .

ception will be given for Mr. Issac
F. Marcosson in Memorial reading
room, second floor of Michigan Un-
ion. Admission by membership
card.
Tryouts are wanted? for the Michigan-
ensian photography staff. Those in-
terested are asked to report to
Miahiganensian office, Press build-"
ing, or phone Vlack, 1656-.
TICKHTS 901I9 FAST
1.H CONCERT SERIES
INCREASED, SALES. ATTRIBUTED
TO SEMI-POPULAR TYPE
OF PROGRAMf
Ticket sales thus far for the Extra
Concert Series have been extremely
gratifying, according to Mr. Charles
A. Sink, Secretary of the School of
Music. All the remaining tickets
were placed on public sale yesterday,
and may now be purchased at the
,Sghhol of Music. Mr. Sink states
that while the ticket sale for.the Ex-
tra Concert Series was not as- heavy
as that for the Choral Union Series,
it was nevertheless much larger than
that of last year, and fully justifies,
the continuation of the Series.
According to Mr. Sink some .of the
increase in the sale may perhaps be
explained by the fact that two of the
concerts are of a more or less popular
nature, instead of the strictly class-
ical concerts of the past series. Thest
two concerts, the first one being on
November 20, and the other 'on Janu-
ary 15, both present the Detroit Sym-
phony Orchestra, conducted by Victor
Kolar, in a semi-popular program. In
addition Raoul Vidas, the French pi-
anist, will appear in the first con-
cert, and Kathryn Meisle, well known
soprano, has been secured especially
for the second.
In the Extra Concert Series this
year, says Mr. Sink, much effort has
been made to secure better soloists
than has been done heretofore, and
every concert this season will have a
soloist who alone. would be capable
of drawing a crowd. Among the not-
ed artists who will appear with the
orchestra are Ina Bourskaya, Raoul
Vidas, Kathryn Meisle, and Maurice
Durnesnil. Alfred Cortot, pianist, will
appear in concert December 4 without
the orchestra.

M ore Russ Players JTO ISSUE GATA LOG jANNOUNCE APPOINTMENTS H ants, H. S. VanVleet, '23E, and E. D.
TO R. 0. T. C. OFFICERSHIPS Iets, '23E; first sergeant, D. A.
To InvadeeriCFFACULTY WTIKHins, '24E; sergts., K. R. Duerr, '23E,
(Continued on Page Two) GE' C. Fowler, '24E, K. J. Fairbanks,
Moscw-iv F, -t wrmDKellogg '24D corporals, J. C '4E, W. G. Coryell, '24E, . F. Ohl-
.so. etptrcl sical23 son, '24E, and W. C.-~W'ardner;' cor-
and artistic attractions from ussingembers of the University faculty, House, '24L, H. L. Kaiser, '23, J. W. sonsW...rr, '24E, . Cner c
are to appear in the United States dur- reques)ng them to submit to the Hostrup, '24E, C. R. Webb, '24E, ' V. Keller, '24E, J. V. Hunn,
r etr p '2 3 , 0 . V . K e l r 2 E . V u n
ing the coming winter and spring un- Graduate school a list of their schol- Gondes, '24A, D. B. Apted, '24E. '23E, W. G. Henderson, '23, G. D. 0'-'
der the auspices of the Russian Red arly publcations since June 30, 1918. 1Company C, coast artillery: Cap- Neill '24E, R. M. Cook. '24E, G. W.
Cross in America. The proceeds of the These reports, which are due Nov. 4, tain, L. G. McElhouse, '23E; first idner, '24E, R. H. McClintock, '25E,
performances will go toward Russian will be compiled by Dean Alfred H. lieutenant, R. J. Price, '23; second, and C. R. Sender, '25E,
famine relief. Arrangements to this Lyd, of the Graduate school, and lieutenants, D. B. McLaughlin, '23, Company E, infantry: Captain, J. J.
end have been made with the People's and J. S. Valentine, '23; first ser-IHamel, "23 first lieutenant, T. R.
Commissariat of Education, which has issued in the form of a University geants, A. Klayer, '23; sergeants, S.
charge of theatrical affairs for the bulletin. M, DuBrul, T. W. Holland, C. Russell, Stevens, '24E; second lieutenants, C.
Soviet government. IThis will be the third time the '23, M. G. Dammoosse, '23E, J. S. Woji1). Crawford, '25E, and M. M. Madden,
The first attraction booked to tour University has published a biblio- j ciechowski, 23, W. E. Smith, '24E; '24; first sergeant, G. C. Weitzel, '25;
America is the Andriev National Rus- graphy of works of faculty members. I corporals, F. G. Davis, S, A. C. Gray, sergeants, H. C. Clark, '24, R. D. Mer-
sian orchestra of 35 pieces, playing The first appeared in 1918, and cover- '25, T. B. Wheatley, '24,A. E. Pratt, E. riim, '25E, T. C. Schneirla, '24, and C.
the balalaika, the Russian national ed the period between July 1, 1909, C. Hartson, '24, P. X. Reed, '24, and A. Wood, '25; corporals, AT. E. Oli-
instrument. The orchestra is now and June 30, 1918; the second bul- W. E. Lustfield, '25. Iphant, '24, -B. L..Korenkiewicz, '24, J.
Iilling an engagenient in Petrograd. letin, for the following two years. Ordinance, Infantry ?rettle, '24, M. B. Parsons, '24E, D.
Musicians Coming Dean Lloyd is editor of the bulletins, I Company D, ordnance corps; Capt. ,B. ;Chubb, '24, D. 0. Cook, '24, R. b.
In December Baroness Zenia Alex- which form a part of his annual re- . . Firestone, '23E; first lieutenant, Gazley, '24E, E. L. Emens, 24E, J. F.
androvna Engelhardt, an accomplish- port to the President. A. V. Brashner, '23E;- second lieuten21Hueni, '24, C. G. Robertson, '23, R. E.
ed harpist, accompanied by a Rus-
sian soprano and a violinist, is sched- ANNUAL ZOOLOGY
uled to arrive, in. New York. At the
same time the Lubimov quartette REPORT APPEARS
playing instruments used in the days
of Ivan the Terrible, will be sent to The annual report of the Director_
the United States. The musical pro- of the Museum of Zoology appeared Ih l
grmofte urtte osit o helstwei.I i Wletnom4en 's) I ! " r H a b e_ rdash

C. A. 'Boyd, '23E; first 'lieutenant, W.
A. Brice, '23E; second lieutenants, C.
W. Kinney, '23E, and J. P. Tynes,
'23E; first sergeant, L. L. Leach, '23E;
sergeants, M. W. Turner, '23E,'R. N.
Olds, '23E, C. C. Gallup, '23E, J. C.
Adams, '23E, M. K. Jessup, '23E, and
G. H. Griffin, '23E; corporals, A. N.
┬░Fenton,. '24E, J. C. Jackson '24E M.
W. Heath, '24E, P. N. Young, '24E, C.
C. Hill, '24E, E. 0. Johnson, '24E, and
M." J. Serra, '241:.
R. 0. T. C. band' Captain, A B.
Nicholson, '23E; first lieutenant R. F.
Kile, '23E; second lieutenants, E H.
Puls, '23E, J. B. Vlack; '23E; first ser-
geant, H. H. Eustrom, '23E; sergeant,
G. E. Bachman, '23E; corporals .0.
W. Stephen, '24E, C. G. Hall, '23E, H.
C. George, '23E, and C. C. Jordan,
'24E
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

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oldest of Russian melodies and ius- pages, which summarizes the activi-
sian folk songs. ties and progress of the department,
Another attraction is the new Mos- and contains a short essay by the
cow "Kapella," a chorus cf 100 voices director on the policy of the mu-
under Paul Chisnakov, of the Moscow Iseum.
conservatory of music. The Kapella Seventy-four thousand specimens
has been created since the revolu-' were added to the study collections
tion, and has not yet been heard out during the year, according to the re-
of Russia. Chaliapin formerly sang port These collections were used by
with the Kapella as a soloist. graduate students and members of the
"Gabima" Booked staff in a number of investigations.
The "Gabima", the oldest Jewish 'rhe published researches by members
theatre company composed of sixty fthe staff appearedain 20 papers, in
members, including its own orches--sicntific journals and the niseum
t isbooked to arrive in New York terials. Two f!llowships were es-
tra, -i oarv t e okablisbed in the museum, upon funds
in the spring. These plays are all beuhed t themuestypnyfthd
gvnin ancient Hebrew. bequeathed 'to the University by the
given nlate Genevieve Hinsdale of Detroit.
The Russian Red Cross is arrang- Exblorations in the field were car-
ing also to bring Philip Andreyitch rifd on by 1G men, some of them
Malyavin to the United States with ebers of the staff and others se
twenty of his canvasses and several I v r f o MP

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MONDAY
7 :30-D II. Norton of Worcester,
Mass., talks on "Precision-A
World Necessity," .a talk on grind-
ing in modern industry. Room 348,
Engineering Bldg.
U-NOTICES
Camp Davis men may secure prints
of pictures taken this summer ly
calling at the surveying depart-
ment and ordering them.
There is an exhibition of portraits of
leaders of the war in Alumni Mem-
orial hall daily from 2 to 5 o'clock.
This is given .under the auspices of
the Ann Arbor Art association.
Westerners' Club postponed to Wed-
nesday, November 1. Fred F. Wy-
mnan, Pres. Westerners' Club.
Whimsies"' subscription campaign on
the campus will be held Tuesday
and' Wednesday, October 24-25.
Booths will be placed in U-Ilall and
General Library corridors between
9 and 5 o'clock. Drop boxes also
will be placed for convenience in
West Hall, Tappan Hall, Engineer-
ing, Natural Science and Economics
b'uildings.

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Inletoii
hops.

hundred of his smaller sketches. He.
will have exhibits in various cities.
Malyavin, called by his admirers the
greatest of Russia's living painters, is
now engaged upon a large canvas of a
typical Russian peasant, to be pre-1
sented to the United States Congress7
in recognition of gratitude for Ameri-
can relief.,

cmr .ikll e university ox enn-
sylvanida, Indiana university, and the
University of Florida. The regions
explored included the forests and cold
streans of northern Michigan, the
plains of North Dakota, the Sierra
Nevada range, the mountains of Ten-
nyssee; isolated islands in the Car-
ribean Sea, and the jungles and
swamps of Brazil, and Bolivia.

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COAL COM MISSION
ORGANIZES TODAY
Washington, Oct. 21.-The United
States Coal Commission designed to
investigate and report the facts on all
phases of the coal industry with ye-
comnmendations for possible legis a-
.ton of governmental legislations, at
its first meeting recently organized by
selecting John Hays Hammond as
chairman and laid out a program for
its future operation.
A.s a preliminary step the commis-
sion telegraphed to John L. Lewis,
president of the United iMne Workers
of America, A. 'M. Ogley, president of
the national coal organization repre-
senting bituminous operators, and" S.'
D. Warner, who has served as chair-
man of the policies committee of an-
thracite mine operators, asking all
three to attend informal conferences
with the commnission next week for
the purpose ofmsuggesting methods of
procedure.

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ALL

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AT THE THEATERS

Today-Screen.
Arcade--Wallace Reid in "The
Ghost Breaker;" c o m ed y,
"Don't Be Foolish."

Ma jestic-"The Old Homestead,"
with Theodore Roberts; and
Ham Hamilton comedy.
Orpheum--Louise Lorraine in
"Up' in the Air About Mary;"
comedy and news.
Wuerth--"My Wild Irish Rose;"
and Larry Semon comedy.

This Week-Stage.

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w1Ilgive yoU

INDUSTRIAL PEACE NEAR

Whitney-"Sue, Dear," a musi-
cal comedy, Monday night.
(sfarrick (Detroit) - "Liliom,"
with Joseph Schirdkraut and
Eva Le Gallienne.
Shubert-Michigan (Detroit) -
Bonstelle- company in "East
Is West."

(By Associated Press)
Elizabeth, N J., Oct. 20.-Secretary
of Labor James P. Davis, speaking
here tonight, declared that America
is nearer to industrial peace today
than it has been for -many years.
"In spite of the great industrial
conflict in three of our basic indus-
tries affecting more than a million
workmen, the. nation has brought it-
self back to the high road of pros-
perity. Production is on the increase
and wages have been stabilized on
many lines."

The big
year in.hi
DO TBE F LISH"
IEALLY FUNNY

SU9PPORT'┬░ED BY

rEst laugh' you hve yhad& this
is latest and best pictucre-

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Special rates for students at Y. M.
C. A. Sixty foot white tile swimming
:Ipool."- Adv.

"REI) MEN'S STUFF"
Always Good

i

STABLSHS P 8810
&ADISONfANUE COW.,FOR TY.UTi1_STRe

INTERNAT!ONAL SW
A R'ADE, OIWHESiTRA
Under Direction o ;
LEON'~ARD) FAL('NE

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H E wasn't afrai4 of spirits or women.
So when a beautiful Spanish prin-
cess turned him loose in her haunted cas-
tle -
That started something that you'll howl
at till it's finished! Wallie Reid's funniest,
cleverest comedy, with a knockout cast.
SUNDAY PRICES
MATINEE-ALL SEATS
31 Cents. War Tax 4 Cents-Total 3J Cents
Evening the Same
ifiddies-10 Cents
1:30 - 3:00 - 4:30 - 7:00 - 8:30

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4. ~'b, rtc+,d
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Telephone Murray Hill 88oo

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Our Representative will be at the

HOTEL STATLER, DETROIT
Monday and Tuesday
October 23 and 24
with samples of ready-made Clothing, Furnishings,
Hats and Shoes
for Fall

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