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October 21, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-21

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1922

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Speaking before a crowded auditor-
ium in the Law building yesterday af-
ternoon ,on "Some Present Interna-
tional Problems" the Hon. Philip Hen-
ry Kerr, secretary to ex-Premier
David Lloyd George during the world
war, outlined the events of interna-
tional politics during the past eight
years :which have led up to the pres-
ent political situation.
He spoke briefly on the causes of
the world war and proved conclusive-
ly that the recent happenings in the
Near East and Europe, are but inevit.
ale results of the war.
"In. regard to the Near East situa-
tion," he said, "I am firmly of the
opinion that it would be wrong ever
to consider the notion of allowing the
Turkish forces to remain in control
of the situation there. There is no
doubt but that the Kemalist forces
might have exercised tremendous
powers if they had been allowed to re-
main in the p sition on the Dardanel-
les and the Bosphorus which they had
gained, if the allied powers had not
steppeda in to hinder further disaster
and destruction.
Destruction Follows Turks
"Wherever the Turk has gone, civ-
ilization has shrivelled and died. When
the Turkish forces under Kemal
Pasha marched upon the city of Smyr-
na the inhabitants fled, knowing full
well what to expect.' I know of no
worse fate that could befall Europe
than that the Kemalist forces be al-
lowed to remain in Thrace. It would
invoke destruction and massacre
worse than .occured in Smyrna, would
begin a process of disintegration and
would intensify economic destruc-
tion."
Leaving the Near East question,
Hon. Kerr took up the problem of
Russia.
"Russia, a country of 140 nillior'
people, is potentially the greatest mil-
itary power in the world," said the
ex-secretary, "it is a nation organized
on a military basis, an extreme autoc-
racy. What is going to happen ' to
Russia is a question which will be set-
tled at. the peace parley.
Nations Must Settle Without War
In stirring words the former secre-
tary to Lloyd George said that "polit-
ical re-adjustment is the greatest
problem of the world,.and if such ad-
justment ever comes up before a great
conference of world powers the
causes of war will have to be thresh-
.ed out in detail. It will be a great
day when international disputes will
be settled by other means than war."
In conclusion Hon. Kerr spoke of
the reasons why nations fail to agree.
"It is the lack of international agency
to bring about unity," he said. "The
fundamental reason why nations ally
is to secure safety for themselves and
not to insure the peace of the world.
When the nations discover how law
can be made effective over the en-
tire world and not only over a nation;
then and only then will wars be elim-
inated.
"The people of the United States,
segregated as they are and free from
the traditions that burden Europe will
be able to approach the problem with
clear minds."
Hon. Kerr, will deliver a lecture at
900 o'clock this morning in room 110
of the general library. He has not
announced his subject for this lecture
but it is expected to be relative to
some current international problems.
Mr. Kerr spoke yesterday afternoon
to a crowded auditorium in the Law
building and was accorded an ovation.
The speech this morning will be
for the benefit of the members of the
Journal club, and the graduate sti-
dents and teaching staff of the history
and political science departments, but
all others interested are invited to at-

(By Frederic C. Telmos)
Reecnt political disasters in Eng-
land, the death blow of the -coalition
at the hands of the Conservatives,
and the ..resignation, of Premier
Lloyd .George will have no detrimen-
tal or evil effects on the United
States" is the view expressed by the
Hon. Philip Henry Kerr, former sec-
retary'of Lloyd George, yesterday aft-
ernoon. "Beyond the postponement
of the coming of the loan fund com-
mission to this country I can see no
bad influence which might grow out
of the recent occurrences in British
politics.. The feeling of England to-
ward the United States, regardless of
party, is one sof friendsh.ip," Hon.
Kerr emphatica'lly stated.
Wlen asked what were the causes
leading up to the breaking up of the
calition.government, Mr. Kerr said,
"Dissatisfaction has' been growing
among the Conservatives for some
time.: They disliked Lloyd George's
Irish policy,' did not agrere with his
policy in Inadia and. his foreignm pro-
gram was entirely distasteful to them.
'T do not think it was dislike for the
premier which caused the non-sup-
port of Austin Chamberlix, govern-
mental leader in the house of com-
mons, at the meeting of the Conserv-
ative members of the house. This is
what caused the resignation of Lloyd
George, put; it was loyalty to party
that prevailed over personal liking
that caused the overwhelming vote at
the meeting."
In answer to the question "What
changes in policy are the new mins-
try likely to introduce," lon. Kerr
had little to say but stated that he did
not expect to see much change in the
form of government with the possi-
ble exception of the foreign' policy.
The Hon. Andrew Bonar Law, who
has been asked by the king to form a
new government, when speaking be-
fore the Carlton club indicated that'
he was in favor of maintaining the in-
dependence of the Conservative par-
ty. Possibly this may meann some:
changes in the new government.",
(Continued on Page Eight)
TO MAIL ILLINOIS
TICKETS MONDAY
Student seats for the Illinois-Mich-
igan game here next Saturday will be
sent out Monday and Tuesday of next

P ROTEST MIHIAN
FOOTBALPLAYERS
Report States Ohio State Officials
Question Eligibility of
Several Men
NO FOUNDATION FOR RUMOR
GIVEN BY AUTHORITIES
(By Associated Press) f
Chicago, Ill., Oct. 20.-Ohio State
university has protested the eligibil-
ity of certain players on the Univer-
sity of Michigan football eleven, it
was learned here today. The matter
has been referred to Commissioner
Griffith of the Big Ten conference but
in his absence from the city neither
the names of the players involved nor
other details were available today.
Columbus, Oct. 20.-Athletic offi-
cials of both Ohio State and Michigan
tonight denied any knowledge of the
filing of a protest on the eligibility of
certain Michigan players as reported
from the Chicago office of commis-
ence. The protest was said to have'
been filed by Ohio State.
Bloomington, Ill., Oct. 20.-Inter-
viewed by a representative of the As-
sociated Press Major Griffith said,
"the matter is too delicate for me to
comment upon. I have nothing to
say."
At midnight Friday a special call
to the Associated Press in Detroit
and to Detroit newspapers resulted in
the information that no verification
of the report that Ohio State officials
had entered a protest with -Conference
authoritl~s' concerning the eligibility
of Michigan 'football players.
Further developments, should there
be any, will be announced either in
the footb1l extra this afternoon or
in Sunday's issue of The Daily.
BERSTUDENTS OVER
ROUTE TO COLUMBUS
Automobiles of every make and de-
cription carrying hundreds of hi-
larious students to Columbus formed
an unending stream down Main street
which continried throughout Friday
afternoon and evening. Led by a van-
guard of some 20 "flivers" gaily be-
ecked in maize and blue and large
block "M"s, this strange parade made
its way throughout the town. Many
bore glaring quotations such as "We'll
dedicate your damned stadium,"
"From and for Michigan," "Crush the
Buckeyes," 'while still others had fin-
al scores on their sides ranging from
6 to 0 and as high as 60 to 0 and all
with Michigan on the big end.
One truck, several motorcycles and
one bicycle all decorated with maize
and blue bunting and large Michigan
banners were seen traveling in the
general direction of Columbus. Si
special trains from Ann Arbor and
several from Detroit carried thous-
ands of supporters to the game last
night and it is rumored that one par-
ty of students will make the trip by
aeroplane. In fact everything in the
way of vehicles, with the exception
of horses and rigs, was made use of
in the transportation of students to
Columbus.
Several fraternities arranged to
race, their most promising "fiivvers"
to the scene of battle, all of which
will add to the general excitement of

the trip.
GRID GRAPH WILL
FOLLOW GAME HERE
Arrangements have been complet-
ed for the reproduction of the Michi-
gan-Ohio game this afternoon at Hill
auditorium by means of the electric
scoreboard which has been installed
by the Alumni association. Twenty
per cent of the proceeds from the tick-
et sale will go to the fund for the
Women's League building
The grid graph was first demon-
strated in Ann Arbor last Saturday

Captain Pixley, who will lead th
Buckeye eleven against Michigan thi

afternoon in the football
the West.

classic '

IRISH TREATY TO
BE RlATIFIED SOOF

Law, New British Leader, Will
King to Dissolve
Parliament

Advis

PRESENT BODY MAY DECIDE
QUESTiON ON NOVEMBER1,
London, Oct. 20.-In the still high
ly 'speculative political situation to
night only two facts stood. out defin
ite: that there would be almost im
mediately a general election and tha
parliamentary ratification of the Iris
constitution is certainly assured.
Andrew Bonar Law, who is to lea
the new Government which will tak
the place of that ,of David Lloy
George, in a message in the evenin
newspaper confirmed his intentiont
advise King George immediatelyt
dissolve parliament and added tha
this would give ample time to de
with the Irish legislation.
He did not indicate however whet:
er the present parliament would r
assemble according to schedule o
Nov. 14 to deal with the Irish que
tion or whether general election
would be held immediately, and th
Irish legislation left to the new parl
ament. Either plan would be pra
tical. The only point then is that th
ratification of the Irish treaty mu
be effected before December 6.
LIBRAISOF STATE
WILL MEET NEXT WEE

Leads Wilcemen
In Today's Fray

,!IICHIGAN
PRIMED F
1 6,000(
YOSiT AND FIGHTING SPIRIT OF
VARSITY RELIED ON FOR ID
ICTOmRY I
|Columbus
OHIO DFPENDING ON o ui1cleig
WILCE FOR STRAT EGY I soon as at
for the th
State Expected to Resort to Aerial extra of I
Attack; Kipke, Workman to in which
Fight Kicking Duel Iplete pla
Fkthe game,
Two teams carried alcng to theI ladi
height of their power, ready to make new tyrs
a last desperate stand, staking all on pects to b
victory and caring nothing for later tig the
Le games will face each other at 2 o'clock immediate
Iended.
is Central time' this afternoon in the de- W-atel I
f dication game of the new $1,500,000 I
Ohio stadium at Columbus, when Wol-
verine and Buckeye engage in their carried to C
annual grid encounter. bo tourists
Some 16,000 Michigan rooters, stu- Nothing i
dent and alumni, will be onhand when ports comin
I he opening whistle sounds to cheer ihasrtvedoin
their -favorites on. Since Thursday o as ed
night the stream of students leaving bocay a th
Ann Arbor has been continuous, bus that Oh
freight trains, motor cars, and mere Wolverines.
e "lizzies" tfrnishing transportation for The gner
,housands.. Special trains leaving last is tat a Mi
night and several more this morningsi
will help swell the multitude which and that wh
is today descending on Columbus from game this a
14 all sides to make the greatest gather- be fighting
ing ever present at an atliletic event ished.
g in the Mddle West. P the b
o. Linejps Kept $eit 'man ability
n- .With the hour of battle almost at betwen the
- hand, neither coach has as yet made game. Mid
a statement as to the probable out tor running
come of the game. No definite line- been able to
up has been given out by either,al- of good 'kic
d though Yost has annOunced that but eleven in G
e one change in the Michigan front will line made u
d be made from the way it started the three sopho
gam e against Vanderbilt last week. bigtgame, a
to Wilco remains silent as o his team'unt11de
to chances, figuring that nothing said is potential st
t is nothing to retract Saturday night. ness againsi
a The general feeling in Columbus unless great
seems to be that Michigan on paper is ade in the
stronger than the Buckeye aggrega-igan
h- tion but Wilce is credited with the Bo Te
e- statement that football games are not Ohio Stat
s won on paper. However, the Scarlet teiling wha
and Grey adherents are counting on Iopposed to
e some unknown' force to come to their flight is co
e aid at the last moment and change a of her linen
I- hopeless cause into sure victory. They football, w
- figure that the cunning Wilce has behind the
he something up his sleeve and that who have e
st Michigan is due for another outsmart- against Mic]
n-head attacl
Michigan supporters- on the other expected fr
hand are not at all confident of vic- tack that w
tory. The setback received at Nash- passes, and
ville last week when the supposedly ity designed
weaker fVanderbilt eleven held the defense.
I Yostmen to a scoreless tie has served (Conti
to kill any overconfidence that might
have been evident in the Wolverine S
camp under other circumstances. A Cork, Ire
general' reliance on Yost and the tra- that person:
ditional fighting spirit of the Varsity to negotiate
ed is about the main hope that is being cans and F
he
- HOW THEY FACE EACH 0
h-
ad
b- MICHIGAN
Capp )n 5
e, F. B.
es Roby 4
a L.H.
l- Uteritz 25
S- Q.B.
or
p. Kirk 7 Muirhead 11 Johns 2 Blott 12 Steele 21
ed L.E. L. T. L. G. C.' R. G.

WAR RIOR
% R BAT TLE;

MIChIGAN ASSOCIATION TO
TENE IN FLINT TUES.
DAY

CON

Flint, Oct. 20.-Legislation need
in Michigan to aid the libraries of th
state will be the chief topic discus
ed at the annual meeting of the Mic
igan Library Association, to be he:
here Tuesday and Wednesday, Octob
er 24 and 25.
Michigan is the only state in th
section of the country that, as a stat
fails to extend aid to the librarie
within its borders, according to
statement by Flora B. Roberts of Ka
amazoo, president of the Michigan A
sociation. Monetary aid is' neith
sought nor desired, she said, but sup
ervisory and advisory aid is need
seriously.
M. S. Dudgeon, librarian of th
Milwaukee public library, and fo
merly secretary of the Wisconsin Li
brary Commission, will be one of th
leading speakers, discussing "TI
State's Opportunities for Servic
Through Libraries."
The opening meeting Tuesday a
ternoon will be given over to a di
cussion of "School and County L
braries and Penal Fines," in whi4
the legal phases of this subject w:
be brought out. W. L. Coffey of t]
state department of Public Instru
tion at Lansing will be 'one of ti

he
w-
.ii-
he
he
e
f-
is-
61-
ch
ill
he
e
he

Elgin 12
R. E

Potcoff 7
R. T.

Isabel 4
R. H.

Michigan Substitutes
8 Knode.
9 Neisch.
10 Slaughter.
13 Rosatti.
14 Plah,,ilr

I

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