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October 17, 1922 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Alpha Sigma Phi; 'Sigma Chi vs.

BIAT VANDERBILT DEFENSE COSTS
MICHI.GAN VICTORY IN SECOND GAME

nes Return With High Praise
r Fighting Commodore
Eleven

LL HANDS PREPARING FOR
SATURDAY'S COLUMBUS TILT
Michigan's Varsity football squad
Aturned from Nashville Sunday night
ssatisfied with the result of the
ame in which they were held to a
:oreless tie by the Vanderbilt Corm-
odores but with nothing less than
ghest praise for the fighting south-
n eleven which so effectively stop-
d them and' for the entertainment
corded them in the Tennessee me-

of the hardest pounding in that re-
spect they have suffered in some
time. Neil, kicking for Vanderbilt,
puled his team out of many tight sit-
uations with his long high punts
which gave the ends ample time to get
down the field.

tropolis.
Vanderbilt showed a great defens-
ive aggregation and if the offensive
had been any where near as strong
the final result of the game might
have been altogether different. As it
was the Qommodores made but one,
first down and were at no time a ser-
ions menace to the Wolverine goal
line.
Offense Weak
On the other hand, the much vaunt-
ed Michigan offensive units could not
get under way properly, teriffic tackl-
ing by their southern opponents
breaking up play after play almost
at inception. Kipke and Cappon did
the lion's share of advancing the'bIll
but neither seemed to carry the punch
they have displayed on nimbrous
occasions in the past. The southern
line presented a solid front to the on-r
slang ts of the Michigan backs ex-
cept on a few occasions and the op-
posing ends were practically invul-
nerable, Kipke turning them on but
two occasions for advances. of more
than 20 yards and Roby and Steger
meeting with no success at all. The
Vanderbilt flankers were especially
fat down the field under pants and
this failure, to gain ground on the ex-
change of kicks, as had been planned,
was a serious blow to Yost's hopes.
On One Yard Line
What later proved to be the Wolv-
erines' best chance to score came
early in the first quarter when after(
an exchange of punts it was Michi-
gar's ball on the enemy's 30 yard
stripe. Kipkeniade two around left
end. A pass, Roby to. Kirk, was good
┬░fo15 yards. First down on Vander-
bilt's 13 yard line. Kipke held for no
ainon an attempt at left end. Roby
hit off -tackle for two. Third down
on Vaundrbilt's:11 yard line. Uteritz
went through tackle for eight yards
and a first down on Vanderbilt's three
yard line. Cappon was stopped at
right guard for no gain- On the sec-
ond down Kipke lost four yards
a'round right end. Third down on
seven yard line. Kipke made two off
tackle. On the fourth down Kipke
made four more off tackle but failed
to twist through for the additional
yard and Michigan's brightest chance
for a score was gone.
Passes Work
One feature of the Michigan at-
tack that showed great improvemnt
wag the passing game which was woe-
fully weak in the Case contest. Six-
teen times the Wolverine machine at-
tempted the pass and five of them
were completed for a totalaadvancetof
54 yards. The defense against the
aerial work of the enemy also im-
proved some over the preceding week
.aithaugh the Commodores did get;
away with some heaves that were,
McCullough and Bomar were the
bright spots in the Vanderbilt'-defence,
these men breaking through time af-
ter time and nailing the Michigan
backs behind the line of scrimmage.
Every man sent into the fray by Mc-
Gugin was a fierce tackler and the
Wolverines were subjected to somel
L~ 4S

Yost Speaks
In commenting on the game yester-
day Yost said, "the Vanderbilt team
proved to be just what I expected it
to be before we went down there, a
busch of fighters all the way through
and men who had been thoroughly
drilled in the rudiments of football.
They had 21 letter men back for the
team this year. That just about tells
the whole story."
Elaborate dedication ceremonies in
which Yost and the entire Michigan
squad took part were held just be-
fore game time. A mammoth parade
of Vanderbilt students and Nashville
townspeople through the city wound
up a Dudley field about three quarters
of an hour before the game was
scheduled to start. Gov. Alf. Taylor,
of Tennessee, made the dedlication
speech and welcomed the Machigan
squad to, Nashville. This was re-
sponded to by Coach Yost in the fol-
lowing words:
"Michigan appreciates the honor of
being here on the occasion of the
dedication of this wonderful stadium,
which through the future years will
do so much to develop the strength,
loyalty and the ideals of generous
service in the young manhood of the
South.k
"Michigan congratulates Vander-
bilt, Nashville, and the State of Wen-
nessee on the completion of this mag-
nificent structure which will mean so
much for their mutual good.
"I might add that I have a great
personal interest in all that this is
and mea.ns. Michigan gave, McQugin,
one of her former football stars, to
Vanderbilt as her coach. My: home
is in Nashville 'and it was here that
Dan and I found the two women that
united us in the bonds of kinship. May
---

the better team, win this opening
game."
Dedica fion Unique
One of the features of the dedica-
tion cercmony was one not on the
original schedule. An aeroplane had
been secured to fly over the field and
at a pre-arranged signal to drop the
football that was to be used in the
game onto the field. In descending
to drop the ball the pilot came di-'
rectly toward the goal posts and let
the ball loose so ,that it came down
directly between the bars. Thus the
first. point in the new stadium was
made not by one of the contending
teams, but by an outside agent.
All of the men who took part in
Saturday's game will be fit for the
Ohio State conflict this week Yost
declares. Intensive practice for the
real test of the 1922 season started
last night and will conclude with to-
morrow's practice as the team will
leave for Columbus Thursday.
Intramural Items
The Intramural office announces
that the following second round
matches . in.. the tennis tournament
must be played and reported by Thurs-
day, October 19.
Doubles: Dreyfus and Goldsmith,
402-M, vs. Elliott and Roth, 371; Span-
.nagle and Lightbody, 1360-W, vs.
Nichols and Peterson, 1490-W; Rich-
ards and Millet, 871-M, vs. Riley and
Weyand, 1460; Browberg and Pagi-
nelli, 2236-R, vs. Hough. and Crouch,
343; Bruske. and Wentworth, 2016-M,
vs. Loeb and -,Steiner, 1104.
Singles: Riley, 1460, vs. Goldsmith,
2879; "Steiner,' 2963-W, vs. Flower,
1166; Greiner, 2824-W, vs. Earl,
1983-M; Watts, 2866-R, vs. Grothans,
2016-W; Ornstein, 2801-W, vs. Mc-
Knight, 1597-M; Dreyfus, 402-M, vs.
Millet, 871-M; Gutov, 2499, vs. Dema
bufsky, 2299-W;.' Schaefer vs Feinsing-
er, 402-M; Peterson, 1490-W, vs. Rice,
371; Stone, 1505, vs. Cohn, 2144-R. -
Appel,73-J, vs. Bruske, 2106-M.
All first round matches which were
not reported were dropped from thel
lists and all of the above listed sec-
ond round matches which are not re-
ported by the time stated will also
be dropped.
I

YEARI6TEAMS SKOW
BEST PROn SE IN YEAR
HEAVY SCRIMMAGES PASSED OUT
BY MATHER IN DAILY
PRACTICE
Coach Mather put his freshman foot-
ball squad through a fairly hard work-
out yesterday afternoon. One of the
teams played the Reserves while two
of the others engaged in a short but
hot scrimmage which was preceded
by an hour of running down punts,
blocking, tackling, and perfecting in-
terference.
This year's squad of yearlings is
perhaps the most promising in some-
time. There is an equal distribu
tion of linemen and backfield mate-
rial with "a number of good looking
ends. Scrimmages have been freqguent
and line plunging has taken up a large
part of the time of the backfield men,
It is easily seen that there will bge
plenty of good men developed and
several among them are already show-
ing signs of future performance.
One. of these is Vick, .who possesses
the triple threat of pass, kick, and
run. He is able to pass Iom almost an
position and although a little lightI
he handles himself in' such a way as
to give indication of great ability.
He is fast, shifty, and heady, and can
Lreceice a pass as well as he can throw,
one.

Only three of the six matches in
the interfraternity speedball tourna-
ment scheduled for Monday afternoon.
were run off. The officials in charg9
of the tournament will be forced to
take stringent measures to correct
this evil because und.er the leagua
system it is difficult to drop teams
from the tournament, according to the
Intramural office.

speeball

In the matches played Phi Delta
Theta Y s- defeated by Nu Sigma Nu,
15 to 7, while Phi Kappa Sigma was
disposing of Trigon 11 to 6. In the,
other game Beta Theta Pi ran away
from Theta.Delta Chi 16 to 2.
The schedule for Tuesday, Oct. 17,
is as follows:
At 3:30 ,o'clock Phi Gamma Delta
vs. Zeta: Beta Tau; Delta Chi vs.
Delta Tau Delta; Theta Chi vs. Kap-
pa Beta Psi.
At 4:30 o'clock: Delta Upsilon vs.

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