100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THEj
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication ofall
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
En'erel at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigao, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: lditorial, 2414 and i76-M; Busi-
ness, 960.
Com1munications not to) exceed 304 words
if sined, the signature not -necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
left at or mailed to. The Daily office. Un.
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
'does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
!I.fl3enS9 2414 and 17-M
MARASING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
City Editor.... .......James B. Young
Assistant City Editor ......... .Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman......E. R. Meiss
Night Eitors-
RalphiByers Haiiy Hoey
J. P. Dawson. Jr. J. 1?. Mack
I. T. iershdorfer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor.............F. H. McPixe
Sunday M agazine ditor........Delbert Clark
Wome-1's Editor ..Marion 'Koch
Humor Editor ................Donald Coney
Conference Ed'itor ............ IL B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor ..........Robert Tarr
Music Editor...................E.H. Ades
Assistants

test. So f'mown college ath-
letes have r'Md themselves above
such methods. But if conditionsacon-
tinue as they are, some day will see
a set of circumstances favorable to the
success of this temptation, and then
the crash will come.
Betting, at best, is undesirable. It
does not evidence loyalty, and in fact
tends to destroy the true spirit of
friendly rivalry which should exist in
intercollegiate athletics. But ifstu-
dents must bet, it is to, their best in-
terests to see that .their money is not
placed against professional sharpers
who contribute only to the ultimate
destruction of the sport. The men
with big money must be avoided and
forced out of college athletics.

IitROLLS
' / la ~f- . -
ANY., DOLLAR
BILLS PLACED ON
THE HOOK WILL
BE GRATEFULLY PUBLISHED
THIS MONDAY DAILY AFFAIR
We had rather patted ourselves on
the cervical vertebrae and rollickedl
about a bit in the belief that Friday
.13 had, passed us up. But such is
not so. No. The demon oupersti-
tion of all time -played a mean trick!
on us when it backfired in the press-
room Saturday night. It seems that

EDITORIAL COMMENT LA
THE POLITICAL PRISONERS I
(Chicago Daily Tribune) I V II L ,l G
The Industrial Workers of the
World, or I. W. W.'s for short, is an
organization the explicit purpose of
which is to destroy the existing gov-
ernment and the existing order of so-
ciety by force. Pending the acquisi-
tion by the organization or its allies of
enough force to accomplish these final{
objects its policy is to do what damage
it can for the purpose not only of
weakening the, enemy but of gainug
recruits. The latter has been called in DETROIT UNITED LINES
France, whence the I. W. W. import-
ed much of its theories, propaganda by Ann Arbor 'and Jackson
direct action. TIME TABLE
In other words, force is tne central
principle of the I. W. W. strategy. (eastern Standard Time)
First sabotage, then seizure of the Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
a.m.. 7:00 a.m., 8:0o a.m., 9:05 a.m. and
government. 'Seizure" is the word hourly to 9:05 p.m.
commonly employed in I. W. W. liter. Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
A nn Arbor)-9:47 a.mn., and every two hours
ature. to 9:47 p.m.
Yet we now have a movement to ob, Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m. and ev-
cry two hours to 9 :oo p.m., iir:oo p.m. To
tain the release of certain I. W. W.'s Ypsilanti only--1 r:o p.m., r:is a.m.
convicted under war legislation, the To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
appeal being urged on the theory that p.cal Cars West Bound-7:o a.rn., 12:10
they are political prisoners convicted To Jackson and Kalamazoo -- Limited cars
under special conditions which have 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
-- __- 1 -To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47

ST EDITION

N

A N

SONG

BOOK

:-:' AT

* lit

BOTH STORES

t_

.ii IEEIEa.hII~l~lIIEI~lfhE~EEuIIIII~~EIEIIIfh7

MEDICINE FIRST

M. 11. Pryor
Durotli y1s nietts
Maurice BeIman
P. A. flilington.
W. B. Putter
Ll. C. Clark
A. 1. Connable
Evelyn J. Couhlin
Jiugere Carwichael
Bernadette Cote.
Waliace' F. Elliott
11a well Foad

John Garlinaihonse
J5a1el Fishe s
Winona A. Ilibbard
Saninel Moore
T. G McShane
W.I3. Rafferty
W. 11. Stoneman
Virginia Tvyon
P. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Frankli Dickman
Joseph Epstein
J. W. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J., PARKER
Advertising ...........--John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising..............Edward F. Cni
Advertising ... ,.......Walter K Scherer
Accounts...........Laurence H. Farot
Circulation.....Did . M. Park
Pulkation........L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants
Townsend H. volfe Alfred M. White
Kenneth Snick Win. D. )oesse
Genre Rockwood Allan S. Morton
Perry M. flayde, James A. Dryer
,rugene L. Dunne Win. 11. Good
W". "Grauliel, Jr. Clyde L. Hagerman
John C. Ilaskn A. Iartwell, Jr.
tialvcye. eed J. lmenthal
C . Putnam Howard Hayden
T3 ,lrmantrout W. K. Kidder
R~.; WCooper Henry Fred
Walace Flower Herbert P. Bostvick
Edw 1.Riede :. Pierce
" irrla l. Hale f
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1922
SNight Editor-RALPH N. BYERS
GAMBLING
Despite the efforts of conference
athiletic associations and universities
to stop it, betting on football games
has continued among students in sup-
port of opposing teams. Morally,
such gambling undoubtedly exerts
Fomewhat of a debasing influence up-
on the students involved, but even a
deeper issue than that presents itself
to those who oppose that form of sup-
posed loyalty which causes men to
back their tam with money.
" . During the past few years universi-
ties have grown enormously. Conse-
quently, although students may de-
sire to bet only a few dollars each on
a game, the aggregate sum to be plac-
ed reaches into the twenties and fifties
of thousands. If the individual stu-
dent wins his bet, he lives exception-
aly well for the next few days, and
if he loses, it comes out of the luxu-
ries he intended to afford himself dur-
ing the coming month. And in losing
he thinks his money has gone to some
other student. But this is not the
case.
With the aggregate sums bet on
football games mounting up. to such a
high figur, the proposition of betting
li S beome exceedingly attractive to
professional gamesters, men who make
their living by gambling. These are
the men who haunt pool rooms on the
day of a gamo and offer to bet thous-
ands of dollars upn the outcome of
the contet. They are the men who
stand on chairs in hotel lobbies, and
appealing to the falsely-termed loy-
alties of team backers, venture t
cover any amount of money which may
be put up on the other sidse of a cer-
tain bet. It is not with students that
students bet, but with professional
gamblers whose entire careers of ex-
perience in gambling give them a
keener insight in making their wag-
ers.

When the weary but happy pilgrims
return from their visit at Ohio State,
all matters that savour of the schol-
astic will be rudely dismissed. It is
safe to wager that of the many thous-
and books at the University of Mich-
igan, not over one per cent will be
"cracked" over this week-end. And
sad though it is, Monday morning is
the first day after every week-end.
Those who have the intention of re-
turning in time to get out their Mon-
day assignments may be strong willed
enough to drag themselves to work,
but the odds are sadly against their
accomplishing much.
Most of us realize that we have to
pay for our fun, either before or aft-
er we have it.- Those pilgrims who
would enjoy their journey with the
freest conscience, and the least im-
punity, will be the sage fellows who,
at the expense of a picture show or
two, or perahps a date, work ahead
far enough, so that when the train
leaves for Columbus, all thoughts of
studies may be dismissed. The assur-
ance that, upon return, one will not
have to worry about preparing Mon-
day's work will make the stay at Ohio
State, and the resulting frame of
mind, whatever it may be, infinitely
more pleasant. Without Monday's work
to be done, victory will be a lot more
enjoyable.
AMERICAN VALUES
According to 'a London publishing
firm British Premier David Lloyd
George will receive for his projected
memoirs in the aggregate about $900,-
000. A neat little sum for the jot-
tings of a man's life isn't it?
This' is just about 12,000 times as
much. as the world gave Milton for
his "Paradise Lost", and is 3,000
tines what it gave Goldsmith for,
'"The Vicar of Wakefield"..
Newspapers the country over are
commenting on this fact. The tenor
of the comment seems to be some.-
thing of a lamentation over the poor
sense of values of a world that would
do this. But,why pick on Lloyd
George? Why not weep in a paa-
graph or two over the poor sense of
values which passes unnoticed within
our own pale.
America pays big league 'baseball
players, for insance, as. high as ten
times 'as 'much as she gives the most
capable of her school teachers. She
rewards poular music writers with
immense wealth while the creators
of lasting works go hungry. Ninety-
nine out of every hundred inventors
are said to die in poverty, while gam-
blers on a stock exchange live in
luxury.
And thus it goes. The fault is not
in the present economic system. That
only registers the demand. The fun-
damental fault may be found in the
individuals themselves. Oscar Wilde,
speaking of a certain cynic, declares
that "he was a man who knew the
price of everything, but the value
of nothing". Does not America fall
especially well into this category?

the new press
k-
I'm sure, and
ped a Monday
yesterday mor
very Teutonic
cause we hav
idea that all
and things we
day morningi
you see how
some of ours
ed in what is
Daily; and ma
not contrib an
to write the<
THEN everyb
That's all.
JAM
Last year, Jam
He used a we
And be Servil
He watched a
James Henry
Knew the Tra
Forwards and
So well,
He could star
Work both wa
And meet him
On the way b
He went to al
James Henry
CHURCH.

got temperamental and
the flying lugs got
mixed up with the
tainnhauser and the
bootjack came off.
So they had to call
in Serious M i k e
(left) to plumb the
,,depths of the trou-
b l e. W e 11 O u r
Daily was held up
as you all know,
the editorial staff slip-
y date-line over on us
ning. This gets us in
with the contribs be-,

'I
in
slm
'ill
ON
l
Pi'lls
I,
ima'
N.
nw.

10

%a- - - - --

4 CANDki~s
STEAM FIWTING

215 E. HURON

PHONE 214-F1

a ┬ža~~a e e 9U WUe =U sa U

e been fulminating the now passed, and furthermore that
somewhat-fishy poems their condemnation was in breach of
re printed in the Mon-ithe guaranty of free speech.
issue every week. And If the sixty-seven I. W. W.'s were
it is don't you. Here convicted contrary to American civil
star contribs get print- right they ought to be freed. Amnesty
ostensibly the Monday for political prisoners has been grant-
ybe they'll get mad and ed in history when the cause of con-
ny more and we'd have troversy has been compromised or de-
colyum ourselves and termined. This is not the case in this
ody' would be sorry. matter. The I. W. W.'s were not pro-
Germans as such, though their con-
* * * duct did indeed give aid .and comfort
FEs HENRY to the enemy. The I. W. W.'s were
es Henry was a Frosh. taking advantage of the war to fight
ar a Pot their own war against the American
e to Seniors. Aate. This is conceded by the asser-
Soph with wary eye. tion of their counsel that they ought
not to be convicted under -,the war
ditions statute because they were merly car-
backwards, rying on their usual propaganda.
If they are not to be released in a
t in the middle, policy of amnesty to political prison-
ys ers, what of the argument based on
self in the same place free speech?
ack The principle of free speech is based
I the Pep meetings. upon the theory of political action

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

m1
2
9
16
23
90

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12
17 18 19
24 25 26
31

F
6
13
20
27

1922
S
14
21
28

USED TO GO

TO'

This year
James Henry is a Soph.
He smokes a Pipe on the Campus.
He looks a Frosh over
With a mean eye.
He fusses
And knows all the latest Jazz.
He sits
In blonde tweeds
On the Library steps
And watches the Co-eds
In,
With fifty other Sophs.
James Henry
Belongs to a Frat
And never misses
The last Show.
He'
Has a fully developed
EGO
And a pair of Golf Sox!
Ain't Education grand!
NUFF SED.
* * *
7OSU Is Also Co-Educational
"Wanted-Students to shock corn."
- Ohio State Lantern.
* * *
AND SOMEONE wants to know if
the' University of Michigan seal on
the wail of the Maj means that it is
the campus theater. Well isn't it?
- * */

u
Ian
I
I
II
I
m
IN
u
DR.

-m

through discussion, persuasion, and
peaceful determination. The I. W. W.
theory and method adopts speech as an
adjunct merely. Its propaganda is by
force. Its principle is the overthrow
of the state by force. It is for agita-
tion in order to abolish agitation. It
demands free speech in order to de-
stroy the right of frV speech.
This is, what has happened in Rus-
sia, where free press, free speech,
discussion, and dissent were denied by,
force and the will. of a minority was
imposed by force. Thus the common-
ist I. W. W.'s, while demanding free-
dom from the state it proposes to de-
stroy, proposes to establish in its placeI
a sytem which denies freedom.
We can see neither principle nor
common sense in distorting the prini-
ciple of free discussion for the protec-
tion of propagandists who deny the
principle and seek to establish their
will at its expense. For all propagan-
da which recognizes the principle of
political change through discussion
and persuasion we would extend the
guaranty of free discussion. But for
the doctrine and practice of forceI
there can be only the defense of force.j
Let radicals answer this: Has the
state a right to self-defense? Or
should it remain passive and inert
when violence is preached or prac-
ticed against it?
If we are asked to grant amnesty to
partisans of force on the ground of
expediency, lest there be appearance
of ipfringement of our own principles
of fredom, we think the argument is
unsatisfying. We do not think there
is either justice, common sense, or{
sound policy in setting free men who
are pledged to a course of violence
and to the destruction of our principle
of progress through persausion. To
turn violent revolutionaries loose can
have no other effect than to encourage
their principles and methods, to say
nothing of submitting peaceful citi-
zens to the danger of unlawful and
unjustifiable assault.
If among them are any who have
repented and who will pledge them-
selves to give up violence and rely
only upon free discussion for the con-
version of .others to economic, social,
and political change we think they
should be released on parole untilk
such time as they revert to propagan-
da of violence.
But to release on the theory of free
discussion men who deny that princI,
ple and resort to acts ,of violence for
which other men are punIshed :would
be stupid paradox. Men whose prin-
ciple of conduct is the imposition of
their theories by force should not be
allowed to escape the 'law becauseI
their action clothes itself in a politi-
cal theory It was never intended that

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds] of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make' and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We giver
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUSLINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6.45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M
....................................
To Demonstrate
OUR BURNHAM FACIALS
we will
GIVE ONE FREE
with every two dollars' worth :
of Cosmetics purchased during
October
STODDARD HAIR SHOP
PHONE 2652
S.*.......!.a ....40.............................
The Official
CLASS TOQUES
We have a better toque
WAGNUR&COMPA1Y
Jor 7en c z9&nce 1&4&
DR. W. S. MILLS
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
616 First Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Office. Hours Phone
9-12; 1:30-5 821-Fl
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

1
.1
I
1
1

WE STERILIZE EVERY GARMENT
WE CLEAN OR PRESS
"unlucky for
We Call We Deliver
EA RS S RSf

t

BRUSHES
MANY
KINDS
AT
L4O WEST
PRICES
FLOOR
WALL
STAIR

PAINT
SCRUB
STOVE
WINDOW
TOILET
CLOTHES
HAIR
TOOTH

BROOMS -SEVERAL KINDS
OF GOOD VALUES

MOPS
AND
OILS
OIL
DUST
FLOOR
CEILING

LIQUID VENEER
O'CEDAR .OIL-
LIQUID WAX
OIL POLISH
LIQUID VENEER
MOP POLISH

"Son, it makes me sick;
see you smoke."
'That's funny, it seems
more in the stummick."
* * *

at heart to
to get me

H OAC'S

Hey You Quiltt- You Only
Stamp On This!
Dear Caligula:

Put a

FOR ARCHITECTS,

DOWN TOWN

I see in this here Daily where a

A smoker and genral get-together fella wants to stop all the Frosh men
will be given under the auspices of from wearing knickrs. Now what I
the Architectural society at the Union think is we oughta make 'em all wear
tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock. Two knickrs. Then we'd know all the
speakers and a novelty number will Frosh by their knickrs. Now this
furnish the program for the evening. idea might not make such a hit with
The purpose of the smoker is to upper classmen who wanta wear the
enable all students in the Architectur- breviated things, but as for me I
al college to become acquainted can't afford more than the long ones
through the Architectural society. As I wear every day, so it's O. K. as far
evinced by its yearly dance, the col- as I am consequented and I'd like to
lege of Architecture has always been hear from the other} half of the cam-
animated by a convivial spirit. That pus in regards this problem.
this feeling may permeate the new KRAY Z. QUILTT.
year, the smoker is open to all stu- P. S.-By the by-by, Calig. I had
dents of the college, regardless of a corking good joke I was going to
class. , send you about a guy who needed a
haircut and sent him over to
If the weather remains pleasant for Betsy Barbour, but then I got to
a few days, perhaps the weather man thinking maybe that one had been
can arrange for a nice storm next sprung, like the one about Registrar
Saturday. Well, part of the stadium Hall, so if it ain't been used lately let
is covered, anyhow. me know and oblige- K. Z. Q.
* * *

STREET

209-211 EAST WASHINGTON

,, p r .tk

k

pc
QUIALITFY.
0l

t

4' QUALITY.
IO

(N

Here's An Alarm
Clock That Will

Wake You

How about a few more special
trains for Columbus? There have
been numerous clamors for a ladies'!

Today's Important Question
"Going to OSU?"
* * *

You'll be on time if you have one of these persistent alarm clocks
because they give a long, determined ring or they can be set to ring
every few seconds until turned off. Well made and handsomely nickel
plated-large, easy to read numerals and most excellent time keepers.
JNO. C. FISCHER CO.

r
E

division.

And few have ever accused gamblers a._______
of particular scrupulousness. Unless To alter the words of a rather fain
rmeasures are taken to curb the activ-
ous lyric, "tble, airplanes don't :fly
ities of these men, collge football
may some day in the not-far-distant __y__g___An _rb_-

Odd Thugs That Occur
Some Pacific Cockney on the Uni-
versity of Washington Daily sends us
a letter addressed ANNE HARBOR.

the guaranty of free discussion should
thus destroy itself. It was established
to protect freedom and not to abol.
ish it.
ONE THING
(Ohio State Lantern)

And if that gril who wears the pink

4' QUALITY.

Maint ne~- ar Wakh.

Up -to-the=Minute Hardware

,~POI .-
j iTy.0

Wah.ner ai

I

ena n ns ar, ir na , , , , wirm e. {vnr ma "

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan