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October 16, 1922 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-16

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Section
I Two

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section
Two

VOL. XXXIII. No. 19

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1922

PRICE FIVE'

PRICE FIVE

FIRST OF CHURCH'
SERICES TONIGHT
"LIVING ON A WAR BASIS" WILL
BE SUBJECT OF
PRESIDENT
DUNLOP TO HEAD WORK
OF SELECTING SPEAKERS

LEGION STARTS ON
YEAR'S PROGRAM
The University Post of the Ameri-
can Legion, at its last meeting ar-
ranged a schedule of events for'future
meetings. Decision was made to co-
operate with the other veteran, organi-
zations of the campus and city for
Armistice Day activities.
The following officers were held
over from last year: I4. E. Hastings,
post commandant; Harold A. Fur-
long, first vice commandant; Clay-
ton Jennings, Second vice command-
ant; M. P. Rhodes, adjutant; Ben
Wier, finance officer; and William
Prout, sergeant at arms.
Willis Blakesley, '22, who was the
delegate from the University Post to
the State Convention held here .Sep-
tember 5-6, gave a report of the pro-
ceedings. President M. L. Burton de-
livered the opening address entitled
"How the American Legion Can Best
Serve the Nation." Prof. F. M. Mene-
fee acted- as general chairman at the
convention.
The officers of the Legion invite the
members from other posts who are
on the campus to join the activities
of the University Post.

May Take Part
In 1923 Opera

I

Dean Marquis of Detroit Is Scheduled
as Next Man to Address
Services
"Living on a War Basis" is the sub-
ject on which Pre's. Marion L. Burton
will speak at the opening meeting of
the University Services to be held at
7:30 o'clock tonight in Hill auditor-
.ium. The service, of which Burton
bunlop, '23, chairman of the University
Services committee, will' have charge,
will last one. hour. Music has been
arranged for the ;evening.
The institution of these gatherings
on Sunday evening was originated in
1919, and has since taken firm hold
of the University life. It is planned
to have as a speaker at each one of
them some man of national repute,
who can deliver a message of serious
and tangible import to the students.
Such men are Hery Churchill King
and Jeremiah Jenks, who spoke at
last years Services. More than 3,000
attended some .of the services last
year, and it is hoped that more than
this will attend them this year.
Dr. Samuel S. Marquis, former dean
of St. Paul's Cathedral Detroit, and
now rector of St. Joseph's Episcopal
Church of that city, will be the next
speaker at the Services.hAfter ser-
ing for sne years at the Cathedral,
he resigned to Become head of the
welfare departmentof' the Ford in-
terests. Dean Marquis is the only man
to occupy a high position with the
Ford Company who did not come up
from .the ranks of the organization.
About two years ago he resigned this
position and returned to the miistry.
Dean:Marq uis -appeare isn the Uni-
versity Servi series May 20, 1920.
HEA" h S RE"OE
NEW HEADQUARTERS WILL PER-
MIT GREATER EXPANSION
OF WORK
With the Halth Service moved in-
to its modern gquarters, University offi-
cials believe that no institution In the
middle-west offers superior health
service facilities than are now avail-
able at Michigan.
The new building, located just east
of the former Homeopathic hospital,
has more than twice as. much floor
space as the old building afforded.
Three new physicians,dDrs. Richard
im pton, Clyde Reynolds, and Sadie
McFarlane, have been added to the
staff. More menbers will be added
during the year, if they are needed.
It is planned to diminish the numbers
of hours of duty by these staff addi-
tions.
A new system of graduate instruc-
tion is being encouraged in the Med-
ical school and the department of hy-
giene will provide additional doctors
who will be on a part time basis.
Another new feature of the Health
Service is the student hospital. Here-
tofore such a project was impossible,
due to a lack of spae:.wAt present the
hospital is qupped with 10 beds, and
15 more will be added later. Minor
operations are at present being con-
ducted in this department: All dis-
pensary work is now done on the first
floor, and operating on the first floor.
REIE PU I 1IO OF
LIBRARY NOTES' PIMPHLET
BISHOP GIVES FACTS IN OC-
TOBER NUMBER OF
PAMPHLETI
Revival of the publication of "Li-
brary Notes" was announced yester-
day wih the first edition sent out
from the office of Librarian W. W.
Bishop.
The publication will be issued onf
the first day of each month under thes
editorial direction of Miss Gertrude,

Magin and Miss Edith Thomas of the
Library staff.
In the opening number Mr. Bishop
reviews the work of the past year and
gives some fundamental facts con-
cerning the Library. He reports ac-
cessions to the amount of 40,000 vol-
umes during the past twelve months,

NEED MANY MEN
FOR ARMY OFFICES
There are approximately 3,000 va-
cancies in the Regular United States
army for commissions as first and
second lieutenants. Appointments will
be made in each of the following
branches: Infantry, cavalry, field ar-
tillery, coast artillery, engineers, air
service, signal corps, quartermaster
corps, ordnance department, chemical
warfare service, and Philipine scouts.
These vacancies are to be filled by
examination. Preliminary examina-
tions may' be taken any time between
now and Oct. 12, 1922. Final examina-
tions begin Oct. 23, 1922.
Candidates for appointment to com-
missions must' be. male citizens of the
United tates, between the- ages of 21
and 30. years, having a good moral
character and a college education or
the 'equivalent.
All candidates .must qualify in the
following subjects unless authorized
exemption has been secured: U., S.
history, English grammar and compo-
sition, general history, geography,
arithmetic higher algebra, plane and
solid geometry, plane and spherical
trigonometry, and elementary physics.
Besides these general requirements
the candidate will be examined in
tlree of the following subjects: Group
A; analytical geometry, calculus, ad-
vanced mechanics, and surveying;
group B: French, panish; group C:
English and American literature, elec-
tricity, constitution of the 'United
States and International law, or, for
senior R. 0. T. C.students only, mili-
tary law, and minor tactics and mili-
tary engineering.
Of the subjects listed as general re-
quiremnts, the candidate may select
a minimum of one, which must be by
examination, and a maximum of three
subjects in group A, one subject of
group B, and a maximum of twO of
the subjects of group C.
Certain technical requirements,
either by examination or having grad-
uated from technical schools must be
satisfied by candidates for appoint-
ment in the air service, engineers, sig-
nal corps, and ordnance 'department.
CANNON CONOEMRS.UI S.
POLICY TFIAROS TUKS
CLAIMS EMALIST A V A N C E
MEANT TO WIPE Oft
CHRISTIANS
(B Assocated Press)
New York, Oct. 14.-Bishop James
Cannon, Jr., of Birmingham, Ala., ad-
dressing. a meeting of the Federal
Council of Churches and of Near East
Relief at the Yale Club recently,
charged that the United States, as a
Christian nation, "had failed to meet
its responsibilities" in the Near East
situation and urged that the govern-
ment take immediate action to at-
tempt to stop Turkish massacres.
. Henry W. Morgenthau, former am-
bassador to Turkey, and Dr. Henry
A. Atkinson, general secretary of the
Church Peace union, joined with
Bishop Cannon in urging that the
United States government should
throw its moral support into the bal-
ance against the Turk.
Bishop Cannon, who returned today
from a trip through Europe and thea
Near East, declared that the object
of the Kemalist advance into Europe1
was to effect a methodical extermina-
tion of Christians.
R 0. T. C Band Organizes
Organization of the R. O. T. C. bandl

Robert M. Winslow, '23D, who played
in last year's Opera and who will
probobly take part in this year's pro-
duction.
PARENT-TEACHERS
SUPERINTENDENT OF 1)ETROIT
SCHOOLS PRAISES
INSTITUTION
"Gain, to the Child Proves Incal-
culable," lie Says
Detroit, Oct. 14.-Failure to co-op-
erate, or lack of interest on the part
of either the homes or schools of the
country would result eventually in
the failure to achieve the aims of
defnocracy, Superintendent F r a n k
Cody, of the Detroit public schools,
says in a letter prepared for distribu-
tion to all. parents here.
The letter, that is an appeal for sup-
port of the Parent-Teachers' clubs,
now located in all parts of the state,
follows:
"There are three inseparable fac-
tors that make for success of educa-
tion. 'They are home, the child, and
the school. The three are bound to-
gether so closely that lack of co-op-
eration or absence of interest on the
part of any single one must result
eventually in the failure to achieve
the aims of democracy.
"To meet this need of social co-op-
eration there has been developed an
agency in the form of Parent-Teacher
associations that possess the possi-
bilities of aiding in the solution of
the problem.
'The immediate aim of Parent-
Teacher asociatons is to bring home
and school into closer relationship;
to educate narents to their obligations
toward the education of their chil-
dren; to co-ordinate education in the
home and in the school and so weld
them into a unity.
"It is only with the changing con-
ception of education as life itself in-
stead of a thing apart that teachers
have realized , their larger responsi-
b lities towad the children. When
they came to understand the mean-
ing of the service they were giving, the
large-minded response to the call for
co-operation largely' was responsible
for the ksuccess in the organization of
successful parent-teacher associations
throughout the country.
"The gain to the parents from such
associations is large; to the teacher
it is enormous; but to the child,around
whom, after all, the whole structure
is built, it is incalculable.
"Parent-teacher associations carry
heavier "obligations to the community
and to posterity than any other or-
ganizations on the face of the earth.
The teacher who will not take up the
burden of that responsibility, who will
not devote some of her time and effort
to the good of the child, is not worthy
of the trust placed in her."
SCHOLARSHIP TO, BE
OPEN FORAMEST'
Graduates of any university are
privileged to try for the Amherst fel-
lowship, according to Prof. R. M.
Wenley head of the ;philosophy de-
partment. The fellowship amounts to
$2,000 a year for two years, one of
which must be spent making observa-
tions in Europe. The candidate must
be well-versed in one of the social sci-
ences such as history, economics, po-j
litical science, ethics, or some other,

FINANCIAL REPORT
oF U NIO' N DURING
FISCALY ISSU
RUNNING OF BUILDING
CAUSES GREAT EXPENSE
BUSINESS OF ORGANIZATION FOR
LAST THREE YEARS BREAKS
ALMOST EVEN
Cost of Repar of Furniture, Build-
ing', and Other Things
Is heavy
According to the financial report of
the Union for the present year, which
has just been issued, on a business
amounting to almost $500,000, the
Union has made a profit of $2,157.30.
Furthermore, during the last three
years, since the Union has been lo-
cated in the new building, the aggre-
gate income of the Union has been
$1,382,976.79, and this business has
been conducted with a net loss of only
$23.78.
When it is remembered that the
Union makes money on only a few
departments, and on those for only
a part'of the year, these figures be-
come significant. The profit that is
made on the commercial departments
is at once expended for house ex-
penses.
It is estimated that the actual
length of time during the year in
which- the Union makes money is
seven months, while the length of
time during which it loses money is
five months.
It is pointed out also that the Union
offers .to the student all the advan-
tages of the modern club house, and
that the expenses for repair on fur-
niture, for replacement of articles,
and for other things is enormous.
NAM MOREUNION
COMITT EE1HEAD S
WILKINS' TO IRIECT ALL WORK
OF DANCE COX-
_ 3MITTEE
Wilson, Boyer, and Green Will Serve '
'ii' Reception Depart-
men
Appointments of four men to
the chairmanships of Union sub-
committees, three in the reception
department and one in the house
department, h a v e b e e n m a d e.
John H. Wilson, '24, was appointed
chairman of the Sunday afternoon Re-
ception committee. Stewart R. Boy-
er, '24L, was made chairman of the
Athletic Reception committee, while
Milton D. Green, '25, was named
chairman of the Alumni Housing com-
mittee. Robert W. Wilkins, '24, is the
new head of the Dance committee.
The chairmen named above have al-
ready begun work on their commit-
tees, and definite plans of their work
will probably be announced soon. The
chairman of the house committee un-
der which Wilson, Boyer, and Green
will work is Philip Schneider, '24, re- I
cently appointed to that position by
Thomas I. Underwood, '23L, president
of the Union. The chairman of the
house committee under which Wilkins
will work is Lawrence E. Dooge, '24.1

"Mike" Ames, who will take one of
the principal parts in the '23 Opera.
"'IN ANDOUT ",TO
Scenery, ( stumes, and all Properties
Needed Will be Attended
to Soon
MORE TlHAN 89 MEN WILL
PLAY IN CHORUS THIS YEAR
Only eight weeks remain'before the
first appearance of the seventeenth
annual Michigan Union opera, "In
and Out," which will open at the
Mimes theater Dec. 4, and. play at the
Whitney the remainder of the week.
Both the tryouts for cast and' chorus
positions are rehearsing daily, round-
ing the production into shape for Its
first appearance. According to all in-
dications, the production will surpass
in elaborateness and extravagance
even the opera of last year, which was
heralded throughout the. country as
the "greatest college production."
The cast will include about 20 mem-
'hers, but the men who will fill, the
parts have not yet been. definitely
selected. In the chorus will be more
than 80 men, which will. surpass the,
large number who participated last
year. 'With the dances rapidly round-'
ing into shape, work will now begin1
on the casting of the parts. Many oft
the favorites of last year's show will
appear again in ",In and Out," but
many new faces will also be seen.
Most of last year's cast is working
on the new opera, and the director1
will have the benefit of the experience
these men gained at that time.
The large number of tryouts fort
positions this year will make it easy
for proper selections to be made for
both the cast and chorus.
Several calls have been received by
E. Mortimer Shuter from men who
plan on entering the poster contest
tomorrow, when there will be a meet-!
ing of all those interested in the plan
at 5 o'clock in the director's office at.
the Mimes theater. From all indica-t
tions, a great deal of interest has been
aroused on the campus in this line of1
work.
Work on the scenery will be begun

Will Dance In
"In And; Out"

some time this week, as offers from
many artists are now being considered
by the management. "In and Out,"
.due to its unique setting offers an op-
portunity for new settings, which the
management will not overlook. Cos-
tumes, wigs, and shoes have already
been selected and the work of measur-
ing the cast and chorus will be started
as soon as definite appointments are
made.
S. C. A. Sponsors
Freshman Talks
More than 150 freshmen have affili-
ated themselves with the discussion
groups which were originated by the
Student Christian association, and
which are now being conducted under
the auspices of that organization.
The purpose of the discussion
groups is to acquaint the freshmen
with the University, and the ideas
and ideals for which it stands, and
also to clear up many matters which
naturally confront the yearlings.
At the last meeting the ,smaller
groups of men assigned group lead-
ers after being addressed by Prof. F.
N. Menefee of the engineering school.
It was 'decided that these meetings
will be ,held weekly, each group leader
to decide the night on which his
group will meet.
A campaign is now .on to add sev-
eral hundred 'more men to the discus-
sion groups. The members of the S.
C. A. cabinet wl co-operate in this,
according to the plans made at the
regular cabinet meeting Thursday.
HERALDS SUCCESS
Professor Hobbs Believes Outcome of
Pan-Pacifie Union May Settle
vital Issues
DEMAND OF JAPANESE FOR
SHIP BILL HEARING DENIEDI
"Anything which comes out from
the Pan-Pacific Union, is straightfor-
ward and is likely to have great in-
fluence," stated Prof. William H-
Hobbs of the geology department yes-
terday in regard to the Pan-Pacific
Commercial congress which is to be
held this month at Honolulu. "Alexan-
der Hume Ford, is really the founder
of this union," continued Professor
Hobbs. "He affected the Scientific
Congress in Honolulu to which scien-
tists came from all over the world.
The Press Congress then followed at
which Lord Northcliffe spoke as well
as David Starr Jordon."
Ban Political Parleys I'
In the congress to be held this
month in Honolulu, only economic
questions will be discussed. Political
parleys have beentbanned according
to the dispatch sent to the Nippu Jiji,
a. Japanese language newspaper in,
Honolulu which published a state-
ment to the effect that'the Japanese
delegates would ask the conference to
reccemmend abolition "of the dis-
criminatory laws of the United States
against shipping."
The interpretation of the Japanese
newspaper dispatch taken at Honolu-
lu was that the delegates of the Ja-
panese were going to ask the repeal
of the coast-wise shipping laws now
in force that permit only ships of
American registry to trade between!
two American ports,
Economical Problem UppermostI
Dr. F. F. Bunker, executive sec-
retary of the union declared in com-

menting upon the dispatch: "It is the
settled policy of the Pan-Pacific Un-
ion not to discuss in the conference
held under its auspices, matters which
should be properly left to the estab-
lished governmental agencies"
During the sessions of the congress,
it is planned to have one represent-
ative from each country discuss the
topic "Significant Pan-Pacific Com-I
mercial Problems of My Country."
The second day '"Transportation and
Communication" together with "De-
velopment and Conservation of Na-
tural Resources" will be considered.'
Treatments of finance and invest-
ments will be presented on Oct. 30,
while the dast day will include such
considerations of international rela-

DENISHAWN'S "SPIRITOF FAR EARST"
TO BE GIVEN HERE oBY DANCERS;
TENTATIVE PROGRAMIS ANNOUNCED

FAMOUS LEGENDARY DANCE WILL
PROBABLY BE OFFERED
IN PROGRAM
COMPANY OF ARTISTS
RETURNED FROM ORIENT
History of Careers of Shawn and
Ruth St Denis Is
interesting
Ruth St. Denis with Ted Shawn and
the Denishawn dancers, recently re-
turned from a five years' stay in Eu-
rope and the Far East where she and
her company originated a number of
dances built from the spirit and cus-
toms of the Orient, will, appear Oct.
26 in Hill auditorium in a number of
dances, a tentative program of which
is here announced.
The prologue of the program, which
embraces the spirit of Denishawn, is
followed by a number of music visual-
izations. They .follow in order:
Beethoven: Sonata Pathetique..
......Ruth St. Denis and ensemble
Chopin: Revolutionary Etude....
Ted Shawn and three of company
Schumann Soaring ..five of company
Brahms: Waltz, Op. 39 and Liszt:
Liebestraum.. ...Ruth St. Denis
'Mana-Zucca: Valse Brillante....
........Ted Shawn and company
The second part of the program is
built on a legend, and consists of three
numbers: 'Spanish Suite," "I a Gar-
den," and "XOchitl,' a dance drama
based on an ancient Toltec legend.
In the legend the father -of Xochtl
discovers that an intoxicating liquor
can be brewed from the maguey plant.
He and the daughter bring the secret
to the Toltec emporer, "V epancaltzinF
Xichitl dances for the king, who, in-
flamed by ' the liquor, forces his un-
lawful attentions upon her. The fa-
ther, having been lured from the
room on hearing her scream rushes
back and is about. to pluige his knife
through the emperor, when 'Xochit
begs for his life. The emperor now in
love calls in his court to witness the
making Xichitl queen of the Toltes.
The last part of, the program .is
known as the "Oriontalia" in whhic
dances representing the spirit of
China, of Java, of India, of Siam, of
Japan, and of Egypt are given.
The Denishawn people have appear-
ed at the largest playhouses in Eu-
rope, as well as at the largest here.
They but recently completed an en-
gagement at the Selwyn theater in
New York.
The history of their career is inter-
esting. Miss St. Denis was a well
known dancer when Ted Shawn, who
was studying to becoie a minister,
and who was temporarily out of
school on account of paralysis, decid-
ed to become a dancer after seeing
Miss St. Denis at Denver. Sme of
the dances which Mr. Shawn has orig-
inated embrace the spirit of the min-
is try.
The ticket sale orthe performance
on Oct. 26 will be held from 2 to 5
o'clock in the afternoon Oct. 17-19 in
the Union lobby. Orchestra circle
seats will be $2.50 and $2. Reserved
seats on the main- floor will cost $1,
while the first four row of the first
balcony will be $1 also. The remain-
der of the first balcony seats will cost
75 cents, while the entire second bal-
cony will be sold at 50 cents a seat.
Mail orders will be sent to James C.
Stevens, '23, business manager, 308
Union, with self addressed envelopes.
Checks should be made paayble to
Stevens.
ENGINEERING UIUTY
TO FOSTER DSCUSIN
In order to co-ordinate the several
departments of the Engineering school
in discussions of interest to all en-
gineering students, the Engineering
society is initiating a new policy in
its first meeting of the year, to be held
at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday evening, in
the upper reading room of the Union.
A dieujsion of the honor system will

be led by C. A. Campbell,' 24E, chair-
man of the committee in charge, and
by some' member of the faculty wl-o
wll be on hand to tell how this sys-
tem has worked in the Engineering
school.
Speaking of this new departure in
the program of the society, William
A. Cotton, '23E, president of the organ-
ization, said, "By these meetings we
hope to unite the whole Engineering
college in the discussion of new prob-
lems which pertain to the school as
a whole, so that we may work logic-
ally and accomplish something worth
while. In the same way we hope to
create good fellowshin.

/\4 She'll Dance Here Soon

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