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October 16, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-16

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THE

:CHIGAN DAILY

. W

CIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
IVERSITY OF NICHIGAN
ied every morning except Monday
he University year by the Board in
pf Student Publications.
r of Western Conference Editorial
on.

:...,
w n W I A5 q ....,. -., ... ,............

.....

:ed Press is' exclusively en,.
use for republication of all
scredited to it or not other-
in this paper and the local
therein.

pub ish

En'ere-l at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as second class matter..
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.y0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
rd Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ss. 960.
Communicationsgnot'tito exceed0Sowords
signed, the signature not necessarily to
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
id nlotices of. events will be published in
e Dailyat the discretion of the Editor, if
t at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
ined comminications will receive no con-
leration. No manuscript will be returned
iess the writer encloses postage. The Daily
es not necessarily endorse the sentiments
pressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-1U
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
ty Editor.........James :F. Young
sistanttCity Editor......M. Marion Kerr
litorial Board Chairman ......E. R. Meiss
ight Iditors-
Ralph yers Ilaly T-Joey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
I. T. 11ershdorer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
orts Editor..............F. H. McPixe
nday sMagazine Editor......Delbert Clark
one.i's , Editor............... Marion Koch
umor Editor... ....Donald Coney
nference Editor...........H. B. Grundy
ctorial Editor...... ......RobertrTarr
usic Editor ..................E.'H. Ailes
Assistants

has that craving for understanding,
that thirst for knowledge, that insa-
tiable curiosity which is primarily
renaissance in -spirit. If that same
intellectul need is felt today as ithas
been felt in the past, we can be sure
that the renaissance is not over, is
not dead.
CLARENCE
"A man's a man for a' that," said
Robert Burns many years ago. And
the events of the ages have served
to verify his statement. Nothing dis-
courages a small boy more than to
have his mother dress him up with
a lace collar and flowing tie and to
hear someone call him "little gil."
Reaching manhood, the male retains
this resentment upon hearing any
doubts cast with regard to his mas-
culinity. Full grown men with such
names as "Clarence" seem particu-
larly outraged when they think of the
indiscretion with which their names
were chosen.
A late report says that "Clarences"
throughout the world are going to
organize to deliberately show the
world how inadequately they were
named. The word "sissy" must be
ruled out of the vocabulary as far
as they are concerned. .
This is a commendable spirit. The
world respects women; it also re-
spects men, but no one respects the
latter with the attributes of the
former. It is reassuring to know that
even though men wear "jazz" suits,
and powder their faces with as much
care as do the women, they will rise
in angry passion at charges of effem-
inacy.

I N l / / U! 1 // / / / lO /! //// /U / f!!

'3

ATED ROLLV
ZEROTO ZERO
WE DIDN'T MISS
MUCH
"rHOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL_-"
I live in hope from day to day
That some fair morn
Cal will adorn
His colyum with my latest lay.

And early I do hasten down
Two flights of stairs
Past darksome lairs
Whence snores my footsteps drown-
Down past the hissing hall-light's jet
Whose modest beams
And stingy gleams
Fantastic forms and shapes beget.
In wind-flapp'd robe outside my shrine,
I quickly scan
The toasting pan
Of Toasted Rolls for one of mine.
But all my labors are in vain,
(I build on sand-
In marshy land),
How long to climb those stairs again!
Perhaps my rolls aren't crisp enough,
Or browned to suit
Cal's taste astute;
Or else the butter's stale old stuff.

I

EDITORIAL COMMENT
THE COLLEGE PESSIMIST
(The Columbia Spectator)
The traditional conception of the
college student has been that of a
happy-go-lucky lad, a typical rah-rah
boy. His concerns were few and his
thoughts flimsy and shallow and as
a result, his thoughts didn't amount
to very much. But, gradually, this
conception wore off and today the
world thinks of the college boy as a
serious, pensive sort of a chap, earn-
estly contemplating the lot of man-
kind. And what is more (whether the
freshman has taken advantage of this
current notion or not we do not ven-
ture to say), he has gone to extremes
and is posing as a pessimist, the
iconoclast who is satisfied with the
powers that be. He struts about the
campus with a niorbidness that would
make the ghosts of Hamlet blush.
Pessimism in an undergraduate-a
mere youth who has not yet begun to
see life--is nothing more than mani-
festation of narrow-mindedness and
limitation. Through his little vision
it appears that that only is his life
which is perceptible to him. And of
course his perception at this stage of
the game could well stand another
pair of glasses. It is merely a sign of
ignorance, a confession of being un-
able to see the greater whole, but of
prating of that minute part of it which
he can see. The earth worm, too, is a
pessimist. To him his little hole in
the ground is the world. The bird
on the tree thinks the world is made
of twigs and leaves.
There may be historical precedents
in favor of pessimism-the fact that it

MICHIGAN

:-: A

:4w

BOTH STORES

LAST EDITION OF

SONG

BOOK

Corduroy Coats $6.50 up.
Co.-Adv.

Wild and

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars -- 6:oc
a.m., 7:00 a m., 8:oo a.m., 9:o5 a.m. and
hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m. and ev.
ery two hours to 9 :00 p.m., r1 :oo pxm. To
Ypsilanti only-11 :4o p.m., r :15 a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., 12:10
P. M. %
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.

ADRIAN ANN ARDOR I
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours Froln Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S
8:4 A.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. No ELLIOTT, PROP
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PhONE 926-11

MILLER'S BARBER SHOP

Wm. A. Miller, Prop.

-- M Otto
Service ind Courtesy
1114 S. Univer ily Ave.

"rsr~srrrsp~rrrsr rrr "rrrrt-

-

476""'

e

a

FUS

To
p.m.

Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47

II. Pryer
rotiy Bennetts
urice Beiman
A. Jillington
B. Butler
C. Clark
B. Connable
elyn J. Coughlin
gere Carmichael
rnadette Cote
lace I. Elliott
E. Fiske
xwell Fail

John Garlnzbouse
Isabel Fishet
Winona A. Hibbard
Samuel Moore
T. .G McShane
W. B. Rafferty
W. H. Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
P. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Sranklin Dickman
Joseph Epstein
J. XW. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
dvertising. ........ ..John J. Hamel, Jr.
dvertisiing ..........Edward F. Conlin
dvertising.... ... Walter K. Scherer
ccounts ............Laurence Hf.Favrot
rculation ..........David 'J. M, Park
ublication........ L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

ownsend H. Wolfe
enneth Scick
orge Rockwood
erry M. Hayden
;ugene L.. Dunne
V,). Craulich. Jr.
ohn C. ilaskin
arviey E. Reed
I,. Putnam .
. D. Armantrout
. . Cooper
allace Flower
dw. 1.,Riedle
amid ~1., Bale

Alfred M. White
Wm. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
nA. . Good
Clyde L. Hagerman
A. Hartwell, Jr.
f. Blismenihal
Howard Hayden
W. K. Kidder
Henry Freud
H~erbert P. Bostwick
L. Pierce

MONDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1922
DRESSING UP
Michigan is going to Columbus ini
gorgeous attire. The band was grant-1
ed funds for /a new set of uniforms,
and now our cheer leading squad has
plaI1 on foot to equip itself in new
clothes. The adage that clothes
make the man is so old that it must
be accepted. But Michigai saw an
illustration of its truth last fall when
Ohio State visited us. The elegant
band uniforms did make their music
sound more imtpressive. 'The yell
masters' snappy blazers seemed to
give their cheers more pep.
Well appointed uniforms on those
whom we are backing always gives
us a sense of security, for one can-
not help feeling that there is depend-
ability in those who wear them. Onel
never expects to see force of char-
acter, or sterling ability clothed in
rags. The exceptions are too few to
invalidate the rule.
The confidence thus derived is hap-
pily passed on. The spectators re-
ceive it from the band and the cheer
leaders, and they in turn, pass it on!
to the players, who by their improv-
ed ncrformance redirect it to its!
source. Thus the thing works in a
circle, passing its initial point, if it
may. be said to have one. It does seem
as if our new clothes came just at
the time when we need them most.'
A LITNG SYMBOL
Tou can get what you want in col-
lege. That phrase has become a tru-
ism. If you want pleasure, you can
find it. If you want license, you may
have it. If you want technical triin-
ing, it is yours for the asking. If you
want associations, you have only to
make them. If you want culture, you
may take as much of it as you are
able to absorb. The one requirement
is that you know what you want.
Colonel George Lyon, of Nelson,
Nebraska, knows what he wants. At,
seventy-three he has enrolled as a
student at Harvard after three years
of hard preparatory work. What he
wants is knowledge, all the knowl-

HIS MASTER'S PRESENCE
That men should not take women
to Michigan's football games was the
theme of a communication published
yesterday morning in The Daily. Noj
definite statement was made in thei
letter as to whether this ban should
be applied primarily to students of
the University, but it can ie so in-
ferred from the suggestion that a sep-
arate cheering section be established
for the ladies in the case.
The main reason given for this al-
leged undesirability of -mixing the two
sexes at a gridiron contest is "the
impossibility of 'serving two mas-
ters" at once. The. male student ob-
viously is the servant, with the foot-
ball team as one master to whom he
owes homage, and his feminine charm-
er the other. The writer of the com-
munication willingly grants his en-
slavement to the superior sex. Per-
haps the "three or four thousand
other men on this campus" holding
similar opinions might not quite agree
uion this one point.
But even granting the .mastery of
woman, can this be a sound reason
for men not displaying school spirit
in her presence? The communication
states that "in the presence of a
charming Being-when in public, at
any rate,-the averag. university man
is shyly reticent in the matter of
cheering, and positively negative when
it comes to individual shouts of en-
couragement to the men on the field,
because he is afraid that the Being
beside him will consider his form
poor," ,
As a matter of fact, a canvass of
campus women on the subject has
revealed the startling truth that the
"Being beside him" is almost quite as
interested in the game as he is, and
unless he goes home hoarse from
cheering and stiff from jumping
around, the "Being" is inclined to
think a whole lot less of him. She
expectshim to be a grown-up he-man
with some of the enthusiasms of young
manhood, and not a shy, self-con-
scious boy who becomes semi-paralyz-
ed and ove'ly-backward when in the
presence of one of the other sex.
Although the remarks above may
appear to be slightly facetious, nev-
ertheless they have a real serious-
ness behind them. The time is grow-
ing closer when the men must realize
that the women are also a factor in
the University, and that their intrest
in athletics is scarcely less enthusi-
astic than that of the men. If men
students prefer to go to games with-
out women partners that is their
right. But on the other hand if a
man does go to a contest in the com-
pany of one of the "Beings," he
should have presence of mind enough
to realize that she is just another
student at Michigan, with the same
loyalties and interests at heart. And
he should cheer just as lustily as he
would were he alone. The creating
of a separate women's section will
solve nothing.
Since Robert Frost went back to
Vermont to pick peaches on his farm
the big question in the minds of his
friends at Ann Arbor seems to be
"When winter comes will Frost be
far behind?"
Did you notice the story recently
which carried a remark about the
"Homoeopathetic school." There was
probably no purpose in the error.

Mayhap they're cold as Jack Frost's
nose;
And soggy, too
And burned clear through
To the last crumb of them-Who1
knows?
ZEKE.
* * *
Ice-Cream, F'rinstance
"All things come to him who waits.";
I've often heard this told;
My hash-house proves it quite well,
But all the things come cold.
LONG BOY.
* * *
THOMAS AUGUSTUS PERCIVAL
Thomas Augustus Percival, -
If he grew a foot, would be six feet
tall;
He wears a sweater
With a High School letter
When he walks down the Diagonal.
They say he used to play basketball.'
Thomas Augustus' mother and dad
Think he looks like the collar ad
(Cast-iron grin
And dented chin)
"Perfect type for a college grad."
It may be true, but ain't it sad?
Thomas' folks picked out his name
With a canny eye to future fame;
They thought it would sound ele,
gant
When he was college president.
Thomas Augustus thinks the same.
It's well to have a lofty aim!
Thomas Augustus grows elate
In thinking of his coming state.
He walks South U. with smiling
face,
(He rather likes the President's
place)
A true man never shirks his fate!
Thomas Augustus can hardly wait.
Tom wth joy is near distraught
In putting on the clothes he bought.
The sox are blue, the knickers yel-
low-
Oh, Percival's a reg'lar fellow-
He likes himself an awful lot:
Too bad he has to wear a pot!
NUFF SED.
Peepul rushin' in at quarter
lowast the hour. . . . Peepuj rub-
bin' their eyes throughout the
hour. . . . IJeepul yawning, pee-
pul stretching, peepul dozing,
peepul (lets of them) absent-
Yes, our eight o'clock.
urch.
How doth
The busy litte bee
To circumvent slow sloth?
He gets up early every day
And doth and doth and doth.

1922
S
1
22
29

2
.9
16
23
30

makes for nrogress-but there is little
room for it in college life where light-
heartedness and the will to be hap-
py are most fundamental concepts.
Editorials have been propagated
against pessimism and for optimism
since the days when the union stone-
choppers were in charge of that sort
of publicity. It was agreed at that
time at a special conference attendedj
by Methuselah and the Grand Cabinet
of knowing ones, that taking one's
self or one's life too seriously was an-
other way of raising the death rate
at a rapid pace. The first time
"thumbs down" was adopted as the
official condemnation signal, it was
against the human family of kickers
later dubbed in most approved Eng-
lish style, "crabs."
As a matter of fact, all reforms were
instituted not by spasmodic kickers,
but by cold-blooded and warm-hearted
thinkers. History will always tell
you that these self-same kickers al-
ways got the worst of it. They may
have been in the right but they were
not in the majority, and the majority.
counts.. If its action is unwise it alone
suffers. Keeping yourself aloof, at a
from the majority; and if you're not
with them you're against them. But
with many of such kickers, it has been
a case of thundering too loud and not
saying anything, or, as Emerson put
it, that they thundered so loud that
you couldn't hear what they said.
WHO'S RIGHT
(The Daily Iowan)
At the dinner table, on the street,
in the hall of learning, everywhere
we go we hear students arguing. Is
a college girl as good as the home
-town girl? Are students cheaters
and, if so, what per cent. of them? Are
our morals advancing or declining.
Are men more honest than women?
Should you wear a bow tie or a four-
in-hand? Students are busy solving
these all important problems.
We can keep back a great indigna,
tion at Socrates because of the twists
and turns that Plato allows him to
make in his argumentative dialogues.
It seems unfair that we must receive

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4 5
10 11 12,
17 18 19
24 25 26
31

'F
6
13
20
27

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside eut
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)
e Official
CLASS TOQUES
We have a better toque

1922
S
14
21
28

$7.50 UP

WAGI1EI&COMPAN1Y
or TI/e CEgg$ince l&4

I'

I

SLEEP AN'VWHERE, BUT
EAT AT REX'S
TRY CLUB LUNCH
Near State and Packard Streets

werdlingS
FUR SHOP

"1GOOD, LOOKING, WARM
AND SERVICEABLE
are the furs which are now awaiting
your inspection here.
Some are trimmed with Kit Fox-oth-
ers withSquirrel-and not a few with
Marten. Nothing will take the place
of a fine Fur Coat for winter wear
LASKIN SEAL'
Coat trimmed in Squirrel, Beaver or
Marten. Length 40 inches
$197.00
CHO ERS
MANY KINDS AND DIFFERENT SIZES,
PRICED FROM

EST. 1904

ZWERDLING BLDG.
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

_ _ .__- / - i mn rr rr rrir ril .rr - __ """"1 'G.

1

No Home Complete Without Its Jug
"FOR SALE-Sweet cider. Bring
your own jug-"
-Our Own Daily.
"DENTAL ADDITION
TO OPEN MONDAY"
-Our Own Daily. :
Have you a dental in your jaw? Oh
come and see the new bridgework!
* * *
And 'FRESHMEN WIN TUG AT.
COLUMBIA". And if it's a sea-going
tug they can sneer at the three-mile
limit.
* * *
Our parting shot for the week.
Verse and more of it.
* * *
Carry it out!
CAIIG ULA. *
A great fear remains to be allayed.

his arguments across thousands of
miles and over the span of centuries
without being able to stop him when
he starts off on a tangent and goes
about the business of making the
"worse appear the better reason." We
are annoyed when he insists upon
confounding us by a confusion of lev-
ers and glasses over which he has an
uncanny control.
But at the students we can laugh.
We all argue; it is wholesome train-
ing and fascinating pastime. Besides,
there are a lot of these great prob-
lems that must be settled, and you can
trust the college student to do it. How
long is a piece of rope? What is the
relation existing between the pop of
a pistol and the son of a gun? If
you fall in love, can you climb out?
But let's get on with the discus-
sion; we may as well get these ques-
tions settled while we are young.
CURIOSITY SHOJ MI.ND
(Wisconsin Cardinal)
Occasionaly one meets a man with
a mind like an overstocked curiosi-
ty shop, a mind cluttered with count-
less shabby, dusty facts, a dingy
mind unlit by the sunlight of rich
i-,,irn v Qnn,thioc and commnrn ens~e

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