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October 13, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tis fall. Lands rand
Wellman's understud

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dies.

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TEAr COMPOSED MAINLY OF NEW
M1EN WILL GO INTO GAME
'AT DISADVANTAGE
LaFayette, Ind., Oct: 12.-With the
first game of the season out of the
way, Coach Phelan has turned his at-
tention to perfecting his team for thg
game with Notre Dame here next Sat-
urday. Seven hundred and fifty
rooters are planning on coming with
the Irish team. The showing of the
Boilermakers against James Millikin
was not very satisfactory. Grmth
Phalan hoped to get in his hardes'
week of practice this year but rain
is spoiling his plans.
Two Men Injured,
Purdue will probably lose the ser-i
vices of Captain Murphy, halfback and'
Kerr, end, on account of injuries re-
ceived in the James Millikin game.'
Murr4hy had the muscles in his arm
torn loose, while Kerr wrenched his
leg. Coach Phelan is dubious wheth-'
er they will be in shape to play
against the Catholics next Saturday.,f
This year's eleven has the strongest
line from tackle to tackle that has1
worn a Purdue uniform for several!
years. W. L. Claypool and Stewart
are playing the tackle positions with"
Swank and Pdleschmann as guards',
and S. L. Claypool in the center posi-
tion. W. L. Claypool and Swank have,
played two years on the team while the
other three are playing for' the first
time. Freshaw has the lead on thef
end position candidates with Morgan,
Kerr, Dye, Geiger and Hawkins work-
ing hard to be chosen for the other
flank job.
New dAa en in Backfield
The backfield which was hurt by
graduation last year has helped by
twd heady 'players in Bahr, a quarter -
back,'and Wellmanfullback, both1
sophomores. Captain Murphy and

tGAMES TOMQRROW
OF WIDE INTEREST
(Continued from Page Six)
Indiana. The Hoosiers, held to a tie
by Depauw last Saturday, do not look
like winners against the powerful
Gopher attack. Illinois. should not
have much difficulty in disposing of
Butler although a large score by the
Indians can hardly be safely predict-
ed. This is the opening game of the
season for Zuppke's men and in that
respect Pat Page's Butlerites have a
distinct advantage, and Illinois' team
is green whereas Butler's is composed
largely of veterans, but the inherent
strength of the larger schools should
surmount the experience and fight of
the smaller.
Notre Dame plays Purdue at Lafay-
ette and is likely to run into a tartar
in the Conference team. The Cath-
olics, wrecked by the football scandal
of 1921, have but two veteran players,
while the Bilermakers have the pow-
er of experience which even the tut-
elage of Knute Rockne may be unable
to overcome. Still, Notre Dame is ex-1
pected to win,. but by a score that
should not be termed large. Wiscon-
sin runs into another bit of easy op-
position when the Cardinals meet
South Dakota State at Madison.
Games in East
In the Eart Harvard is all set for
its third successive win, playing Bow-
doin at Cambridge. Princeton may
find some difficulty in disposing of
Colgate by a large score, ,but should
win without much difficulty. Pennsyl-
vania is expected to conquer the
Maryland attack with ease, but the.
West Virginia-Pittsburgh game may
not be easily decided. Washington
and Jefferson,. too, cannot 'expect a
great triumph over Carnegie Tech
but can look forward to a win,'While
(Continued on Page Eight)

U IIIlU U U I U IUII IlHIIIIIIL L
F STEEL A
LARGEST SRUCTURE OF TYPE
I COUNTRY; SEATS
72,000
Ohio stadium, which will be dedic-
ated on Saturday, Oct. 21, at Colum-
bus when the Wolverines play Ohio
State in that city, is now considered
as being the best structure of its kind
in the country. It is of horse shoe
shape being open at one end and has
a permanent capacity of more than
62,000, making it the largest stad-
ium of its type in the country, and
second only to the Yale bowl. When
necessary more than 10,000 more
seats can be added, giving it a capac-
ity of more than 72,000.
The new stadium, which was con-
structed at a cost of one million three.
hundred and fifty thousand dollars,
was financed chiefly by gifts aggre-
gating more than a million dollars
pledged by 13,000 people.
The stadium is a double-decker
having 41,000 seats in the lower tier,
including 3,500 box seats, and 21,000
'in the upper leek. Of this total the
closest seats to the playing field are
12 feet from the sidelines while those
farthest away are only 231 feettdist-
t ,
ant.
From one end of the stadium to the
other the circumference is one-third
of a mile covering a ground area of
more than 10 acres. The height of
the wall is a fraction more than 98
feet wlile th elength is 754 feet and
the width 597.
The entire stand is made from steel
and concrete and has twelve ramps
which feed 112 aisles. Tickets may
be presented at 81 different entrances

to nandle a capacity crowd.
There are several advantages of a
stadium erected after the plan of the
Ohio plant. By having two decks
the rear seats are brought much near-
er the field proper and by curving
the sides almost all seat values are.
equalized, this being quite a factor in
crowd psychology. The open end is
also an important advantage as it
greatly improves the ventilation for
such a large number of people sittjyng
together.
Among the architectural features
are 87 concrete and steel arches each
of which is 13 feet wide and 56 feet
high. At the open and and at all the

to this is a half dome which is 86 1-2
feet high and 70 feet in diameter.
Intramural Items
All first round matches in both
singles and doubles of the all-cam-
pus team's tournament must be played
off and the results turned in to the
Intramural office, Waterman gymnas-
ium, phone 2268, by Monday noon.
Inclement weather has caused the,
granting of an extension of time by
Director Mitchell.

Spieedball

were in Ann Arbor
ness the Michigan-C
report on the streng
ne team. Their a
'nounced.

th

The speedbalf schedule for today1
follows: at 3:30 o'clock, Xi Psi Phi
vs. Cygnus; Delta Kappa Epsilon vs.
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Kappa Nu vs.
Lambda Chi Alpha. At 4:30 o'clock
Zeta Beta Tau vs. Phi Gamma Del-I
ta; Psi Upsilon vs. Phi Chi. Delta
Tan Upsilon drew a bye and will be
given an opponent when the next
drawings are made.
Corduroy Coats $6.50 up. Wild and
Co.-Adv.
M1ichigan. Daily and. Chimes, for $4.50.

their

Cunard Protests Daugherl
New York, Oct. 12.-Offic
Cunard line announced to
they had launched steps to i
case into- the United State
I court of the ruling of Atte
eral Daugherty that ships fl
j eigi flag could not bring
passengers within the three
Corduroy Coats $6.50 up.
Co.-Adv.

0

First Class TailorlIg
FOR LESS MONEY
My customers don't pay a big overhead

Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50. Co.-Adv.

I

ANN ARBOR CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY

charge on suits I make.
GOOD suits, nevertheless.

BEut there

'.
0
4?
rI.
'.
U~

THIRTY MINUTE ,SERVICE
All Kinds of Repair Work
Shoes called for and delivered
free o charge
H. W. CLARK, 534 Forest Avenue
SHOES TAILORED TO YOUR FEET

ALBERT GANSLE

113 S. MAIN

Above Cliapm an's

ii

'

op -0w40%

PhQne 3043

ANN ARBOR, CUSTOM SHOE FACTORY

Saturday, October 14

.}

IS CANDY DAY

wiw rl r+. ++ + r. +r LYYr . .

SEND HER A BOX
From The Daisy Candy Shop

Dollar Razors
Auto Strop -Gillette

We Pack Insure and Mail

wM+M1 W1 r ay
.
tj' .fit.
,
'+
'

Gem
Eveready

y

Inidentally *-- why
Cigarettes and

not stock up on
Tobacco --- at

DETROIT PRICES

Any one of these will give excellent service

The Eberbach & Son Co.
200-204 EAST LIBERTY STREET

Daisy Candy Shop
308 E. LIBERTY ST.

i m

,.

O-k--Pft I

TOPCOATS'

r

r, t 4

I

w.

® 2

Plain,,
always
fortabl

loose- fitting models,
dressy, mighty com--
e. 35.00 up.

Tickets

Exhausted

for

'WAGNER&LCOMP HY
~for Men C kSunee 1K46

Choral

Union

Series

;;
1
,.:
1

Orders have been received in such' large numbers that the Main Floor, the First Balcony
and the front half of the Second Balcony have been sold out. A limited number of seats in the
Second Balcony remain at $4.50 and $5.00 each. These may be ordered so long as they last.
If any still remain, they will be offered to the general public at the School of Music, SATUR-
DAY, OCTOBER 14.
FOR THE
Extra Concert Seriei
Good tickets remain on all floors as follows: Main Floor, $4.00 and $5.00; First Balcony,
$4.00 and $5.00; Second Balcony, $2.00 and $3.00 Mail orders will be selected i the order
of receipt.

I

L A SI F= .
CLOSES CLOSE
Al& 3P.M ADVERTISING AT 3 P
MICHIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per word a day, paid in advance. Mir
imum charge for first day, 25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. Thre
cents per word per day if charged. White space charged for at rat
of e per agate line. Classified, charged only to those having phone
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advanc
PHONE 960

I

I

Just as, the early bird catches the
worm-so will an early choice mean a better over-
coat for you this fall.
AT PRESENT BUR STOCK IS COMPLETE.
Every coat genuine Fitform style and quality.'
Come in and make your choice. We will lay the coat
away for future deh very if you desire.
The main thing is that you make your choice NOW I

In this series five stupendous programs will be offered:

Alfred Cortot, "A Second Paderewski" In a piano recital, December 4.'
Ina Bourskaya usian ColoraturaSoprano, soloist with the Detroit Orchestra, under
Maurice D U mosn,' rt i French Pianist, soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, under
OSSIP GAMRILOWITSCH, February 19.

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Sport model Ford- Top,
curtains, demountables. A-i Run-
ning condition. 507 E. Liberty. 17-3
FOR SALE-Tenor Banjo. Excellent
for beginner. McKelvey, 509 .E.
Jefferson. 17-1
FOR SALE-Corona typewriter.
Call at '327 East William St., or
phone 76. 15-6
FOR SALE-Ford touring 1920. Good
condition. Call Carl. 2574-M, 725
Haven. 17-2
FOR SALE-Cheap. Pair of good soc-
cor shoes. Phone 2480-J. 908 Mary
St. 17-1
FOR SALE-Sweet Cider. Bring your
jug. Chas. Klager, 617 S. Main St.
10-25
FOR SALE-Three tickets to Michii
gan Ohio game. Box 13 care Daily.
16-21
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-New completely furnish-
ed apartment, two rooms and bath.
Continuous hot "soft water. Separ-
ate entrance and phone. Near cam-
pus. Professional man or woman

WANTED
WANTEi'D-Garage in vicinity of
Hams and Thompson. 2528-R.
to.
WANTED-Garage near Oakland
S. V. Phone 746-R.
LOST
LOST-Ruby finger ring. Val
for sentimental reasons. Ca
1222 Washtenaw, or phone 88
Reward.
LOST-Alpha Omicron Pi soi
pin. Call Lorna Ketcham.
*Reward.
LOST-Lwer part of silver fou
pen, Monday morning. Finder pl
call 251.
. MISCELLANEOUS
OPPORTUNITY-Pay for educati
part time canvassing. Capil
coal situation. Generous con
sions. Make formal applicat
Soot-Hook Manufacturers,
Prospect, S. E. Grand Ra
Mich.
KODAK FINISHING--8 hour ser
Photographs all kinds- Anyw
anytime. Hanselman, 735 H

I

Raoul Vidas,

French Violinist, soloist with Detroit Symphony Orchestra, 1# a Popular. Program,
under VICTOR KOLAR, November 20. '

PRICES

1.

Kathryn Melsle,

American Contralto, soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, in a Popular
Pro gram, under VICTOR KOLAB, January 15.

$35.00 TO $50.00

Address orders to

T (M

C(R Q?~ RF.A T 7'T' CT1T7(

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f"IY T A T) T,, "CCU 'A QTXTTl [' _ _ _

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