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October 13, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-13

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VOL. XXXIII. ;No: 17 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, ,CTOBER 13, 1922 EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

ERYICE KEYNOTE
OF FIFTH ANNUAL
TRADITIONS DAY

SPEECHES MADE BY
FRAYER, JOHNSON;
FURNISHED

HILLERY,
MUSIC

'26 MEN PRESENT URGED
TO KEEP CLASS UNITY

VARITY GIVEN SENDOFF
More Than 200 Cheer Football Team
At Depot
Michigai gave her football team a
rousing sendoff yesterday afternoon
at the Ann Arbor railroad station
when the squad entrained for its trip
to Vanderbilt, where it will meet the
Southerners on their own ground.
The crowd, numbering more than
200, gathered early, and spent the in-
terval before the arrival of the train
in cheering the team as a whole, the
individual members, and the Coach.
Cheerleader W. 11.Frankhauser, '24,
was present leading. cheers, and the
assembled students responded readily.
As the train left the station, the
crowd joined in a last locomotive, and
the team was off for its invasion of the
South.
0, H NESNWN

Curtiss Racing Triplane Is Badly Damaged
In Collision With Pier On Detroit River

/ ... r' *1

Burton
At

To Speak
First Service

i

MIMES' PLANSFOR '23 OPERA
IOUND INTO SHAPEL AS UUBOOKU
'"IN AND OUT55, IS CHOSEN

E R. MEISS, '23, IS AUTHOR OF
STORY, LYRICS, AND
MUSIC
SHUTER OPTIMISTIC
OVER POSSIBILITIES

and Honesty Emphasized
Fundamental Michigan
Traditions

As

Service to the University and pre-
servation of her traditions was the
byword impressed upon the freshmen
by the Traditions Day speakers in the
fifth annual celebration of the cere-
mony held last night in Hill auditor-
ium.
"The importance of traditions can-
not be overemphasized," said Carl
Johnson, '20, alumni speaker for the.
evening and famous Michigan track
athlete. "Following Michigan tradi-
tions makes a Michigan man and puts
the stamp of Michigan on you, which
remains with you wherever you go.
Now is the time to make them a part
of your life-"
Glee Club Sings
"Laudes Atque Carmina," sung by
the glee club, after several selections
by the Varsity band, officially opened
the meeting. The auditorium was
completely filled with students as
Vernon F. Hillery, '23, president of
the Student council and student
speaker for the evening arose to give
the initial address.
Prof. William A. Frayer, of the his-
tory department, was the second
speaker on the program. In speak-
ing of the specific' traditions of the
University he said, "The tradition of
studies is one of foremost importance,
not only for the new men but for all
of us. It is for that that we are
here."
Student honesty in examinations
and in everyday life was also touch-
ed upon by the professor. As a bit
of advice for the coming Ohio game,
when it is expected that a majority
of the school will go to Columbus, he
said, "When you go away from Michi-
gan and down toColumbus next week
don't forget that you are still Michi-
gan men and expected to act as
such."
Johnson Speaks
Carl Johnson, '20, was the final
Traditions day speaker. Before com-
mencing his address, he asked thej
freshmen class to stand so that every
one might have a chance to view the
new class of '26 as a body. After they
had reseated themselves he began,
giving the definition and value of
traditions and the unifying influencej
which they have over a new class. In
urging the new men to stay together
as a definite unit in University life he
said, "Serve your University and live
up to her traditions and you will stay
together as Michigan men throughout
your entire lives."
"The Victors," and "Varsity" were
then played by the band and the sing-
ing of "The Yellow and Blue" marked
the end of the program.
FURLONG HONORED
Harold A. Furlong, '24M, left last
night for New Orleans, where he ,will
attend the fourth annual convenition
of the Ameircan Legion next week.
Furlong attends this convention ats a
Medal of Honor man, of which 22 are
expected to be present.
During the convention, plans for a
national organization. of Medal Honor
men will be completed. Fu'long is
chairman of the committee in charge
of arrangements.

President Marion L. Burton wil be
the speaker at the first University
services of the year, to be held at
7:30 c,'clock Sunday evening in Hill
Auditorium. The topic of the Presi-
dent'saddress is "Living on a War
Basis.". A musical program has been
arranged under the direction of Earl
Moore and William Wheeler, of the
School of Music faculty.
The University services are ar-
ranged by a committee of representa-
tive seniors, working in conjunction
with the churches of the city. Eight
services have been planned for the
coming year.
GILBERT PARKERT ,1K UI 9
Famous English Author and States.
man Is Substitute on Lecture
Course

Work

of Casting and Development of
Dance Speclalties Near
Completion

Averages 105 Miles Per l our
Heavy Army Transport
Plane

ih

SECOND RACE OVER SAME
COURSE WON BY H. HARRIS
Mt. Clemens, Oct. 12.-Piloting al
heavy Martin transport driven by two
400 horsepower Liberty motors, Lieut.
D. H. Nelsin, of Mt. Clair, N. J., won
the Detroit News aero mail trophy
race for multi-motored planes here
today. He covered the 220 miles tri-
angular course at an average speed
of 105 miles an hour.
The Detroit Aviation Country club
trophy race flown over the same
course was won by Lieut. Harrol H.
Harris, one of two army entrants in
the "Honeymoon' Express" equipped
with 'a 400 horsepower Liberty twelve
motor. Lieut. Harris averaged 135
miles an hour in this event, which was
for light commercial planes, finishing
four' laps ahead of C. S. Jones in a
Curtis Oriole, who averaged 110 miles
an hour.
A stiff northwest wind blowing up
the tails of the big planes in the
Detroit News event made necessary
abandonment of the original plan of
starting all of. the craft together.
Consequently the planes, each weigh-
ing 5 tons and having a wing spread
of 70 feet, took the air one after the
other. Lieut. Nelsin's plane flying high
was the last to cross the startinig line.
Tha transport began at once to over-
haul the other racers and before the
race was three-quarters over it was
seen that unless forestalled Lieuten-
ant Nelsin would win.
URGES SPEED AT
EAST CONFERENCE
Constantinople, Oct. 12.-Lieut.-Gen.
Frank Charles Harrington, the Brit-
islA commander-in-chief here, will
press the Allied powers for an early
convening of the peace conference
which he believes will be the most
important council of world powers
since Versailles.
It is expected that the League of
Nations will require from two to
three months at least as the questions
for decisions are of the widest impor-
tance, including the vital interest of
all of Europe and will likely involve
many matters entirely +outsidd the
Near East.
The Allied authorities here will op-
pose the selection of Constantinople
for the meeting of the .conference.
Soph 'Ensian Tryouts Needed
All sophomore men wishing to try
out for thj business side of the Michi-
ganensian, are asked to report after
2 o'clock any afernoon this week.

Crowds Viewing Wrecked Plane After Crash
Buffeted by a stiff wind, the bi g Curtiss triplane, piloted by Lieut. R. Irvine, crashed into a pier at De-
troit and was badly damaged. So far this has been the only accident to planes assembled for the Pulitzer races.
Hundreds of curious persons inspect ed the wreck after the crash.

GRAPH OPERATOR
EXPECTED TODAY.

Deserted Campus DENTAL ADDITION
,II Predicted Today r

Apparatus and Equipment for
Eleetric Score Board
Arrive

New

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION NAMES
ASSISTANT TO RECEIVE NEWS
Electrical apparatus and equipment
for the grid graph, the electric score
board which is to reproduce the Van-
derbilt game in Hill auditorium Sat-
urday afternoon, has arrived and the
operator for the machine is expected
today.
The set requires only one man for
operation, all the lights being con-
trolled by one switchboard. This man
will be sent from the Potter and How-
enstine company of Columbus, makers
.of the grid graph, and will do both
the installing and working of the ap-
paratus himself.
To assist this man, however, the
Alumni association has asked John
Bacon, '23, 4ublicity man for the Ath-
letic asociation, and a member of the
reserve team, to be at the special
Western Union wire when the plays
come in. It is felt that with two men
there who are connected with the foot-
ball squad and have a knowledge of
the technicalities of the game, better
results may be obtained.
The band and cheerleaders will al-
so be in the auditorium when the re-
ports come in. An admission fee of
35 cents will be charged to help cover
the operating expenses. Tickets are
now on sale at the Union, Huston's,
the Alumni association office, Gra-
ham' book stores, and Wahr's State
street store.
Ohio Block "M"
IS Now Assured
Michigan wil have a block "M" at
the Ohio State game Oct. 21 at Co-
lumbus. The Booster's club under the
direction of the Athletic association
will sponsor the buying of the mater-
ials and will lay out the "M" at the
game.
Banners of yellow and blue will
make up the mammoth letter. Instead
of having flags on sticks, this year
the banners will be larger in size
and will have two safety pins attach-
ed on two corners' so that the banner
may be pinned on the front of all per-
sons in this particular section. The
"M" will thus be visible at all times
whether the crowd be seated or stand-
ing. The flags which will be tacked
to the seats in the Michigan section
are to be worn by all those who have
tickets in the section. The section
marked out may be seen on the blue-
print in the window of Graham's Book
store.
Auto Club Logs Road to 0. S. U.
Mr. L. F. Van Nortwick, secretary of
the Ann Arbor branch of the Detroit
Automobile club, left early Wednes-
day morning, Oct. 12, to log the road
between Ann Arbor and the Ohio
State university stadium. He will se-
cure information concerning the
route, road conditions, and hotel ac-
comodations.
Nebraska Launches Drive for Stadium

Left-handers,nhump-backs, and
cross-eyed persons can hold- merry
wassail today, but the beautiful should
stay in-doors. Cuz why? Its Friday,
the thirteenth
The sixth day in the week, histor-
ians say, was named after Freya, the'
ancient Anglo-Saxon goddess of beau-
ty. If' mythology can be believed,
however, the charming goddess was on
poor terms with the classical fore-
runner of Lady Luck. From time im-
memorial, beauty has been unlucky.
Look at Anne Boloyn, or Marie An-
toinette or any of the delectable
maids from Evelyn Thaw right back
to Eve herself. The breaks were al-
ways against them.
Tradition says left-handers, hump-
backs, and the cross-eyed. ones are
immune to the evil spell of Friday,
the thirteenth. But, beware if you are
beautiful!

I V Ul L!! ill UE1/UiII

Greatly

Enlarged Clinic Contains 200
Chairs and Is Fully
Equipped

IMPROVEMENTS PLACE MICHIGAN
AMONG THE LEADING SCHOOLS
"The new addition to the Dental
building will be open and ready for
use next Monday," is the announce-
ment made by Dr. M. L. Ward, dean
of the College of Dental Surgery.
In addition to the new structure the
facilities have been greatly improved
by an entire remodelling of much of
the old building. The original build-
ing, erected in 1908, was at that time.
entirely adequate for the work, but
owing to recent improvements in
methods of teaching and a consider-
able increase in the size of the school,

HAS AND SENIOR LITS{
ELECT OFFICERS TODAY
GIBSON AND HALL NOMINATED
FOR PRESIDENT BY
'23 CLASS
Elections for all the law classes and
the senior literary class will be held
from 9 to 3 o'clock today in the Law
building and University hall, respect-
ively.
The senior law class has nominated
M. P. Norcop and F. F. Wynn for
president, Joseph Boyle and L. R.
Williams for vice president, G. W.
Rouse and Gladys Wells for secretary
and R. S. Stuart and G. K. O'Brien for
treasurer.
R. M. Ryan and Carl H" Smith were
chosen as nominees for the office of
president by the junior laws, with W.
N. Seelye and D. L. Patrick for sec-
retary, and Joseph Allen and C. R.
Jennings for treasurer. Both nomi-
nees for vice president were found to
be ineligible.
J. Wolf and E. F. Hascall were se-
lected nominees for the office of presi-
dent of the freshman law class with
G. D. Curtis and Forest- Hoffman for
vice president ;for secretary, V. J.
Vorhees and T. G. McShane; and for
treasurer, W. A. Ewart and F. V.
Lambertson.
The senior literary class nominat-
ed the following persons as candi-
dates for class offices: for president,
R. D. Gibson and R. Hall, for vice
president, Ruth Werkheiser and J. S.
Van Alstyne, for secretary, Elizabeth
Hoyt and Elizabeth Forsythe, and for
treasurer, Burton Dunlop and Law-
rence Snell.
ENGINEERS DOING
RESEARCH STUDY
With prospects that definite conclu-
sions will be reached in the near fu-
ture, Prof. B. F. Bailey, acting head of
the department of electrical engineer-
ing, and five assistants are continu-
ing their research stury of the ac-
tion of induction motors with unbal-
anced voltages.
The work has been in progress for
three years, Professor Bailey being
assisted by two assistants, and three
students who receive credit in elec-

has since been found inadequate.
With the new additions the Michigan
dental college will again be placed in
a prominent position among dental
schools throughout the country, being
rivaled, it is said, by only two. It
will now be able to accommodate a
senior class of 200, which means that
an enrollment of 800 may be easily
taken care of. This is as considerable
more than the present enrollment.
The next important feature of the
remodelled building is the greatly en-
larged operative clinic, containing
200 chairm, and equipped with every
conceivable improvement. Much of
the old equipment, now obsolete, has
been scrapped. The construction of
a new amphitheater for demonsra-
tive and teaching. purposes. has also
been made possible by the building of
the addition.
Ex-Student Finds
Indian Trinkets
In Lenaway County

ADDRESS BY JUDGE KENYON
PREVENTED BY COURT RULING
Sir Gilbert Parker, distinguished
British novelist publicist, traveller,
and, statesman, has been secured .by
the Oratorical association to take the
place of Judger William S. Kenyon,
who is unable to fulfill, his lecture
engagement here for Tuesday, Oct.
17, because of a court ruling which
forbids members of the supreme
bench delivering speeches of this
kind.
Oratorical association officials con-
sider themselves particularly fortu-
nate in having Parker here at this
time, being able to obtain him next
Tuesday while he is on his limited
transcontinental tour. For years Sir
Gilbert has been a prominent figure
in English and world politics, thr ugl
his long service iii parliament, and
his experience on special commissions
during the war. Besidesbeing high in
the field' of political issues Parker has
achieved outstanding success as a,
novelist and publicist resulting from
his own extensive writings.
The University Oratorical associa-
tion offers an opportunity to hear an
internationally known writer, travel-
ler and statesman. Due to its com-
prehensive program of well known
men the association's season tickets
have been selling with marked suc-
css. Some tickets are still availa-
ble and may be procured at thet rate
of $3 for the reserved section and
$2.50 for the unreserved divisions.
Single admissions to the Sir Gilbert
Parker lecture may be obtained
for $1;
'16 COURSES PLANNED
BY EXTENSION SERVIC
S SC
DETROIT, BIRMINGHAM, PONTIAC,
* LANSING, AND FLINT
INCLUDED

"In and Out" is the name of the 1923
Michigan Union opera which will open
in Ann Arbor, on Dec. 4, and play here
the rest of the week. The story, lyr-
ics, and music were all written by
Edwin R. Meiss, '23, who has been
working on the book since early last
spring.
This is the first time in the history
of the opera that the complete piece
has been written by one man, and the
work shows the effect by having a
more complete unity of story, lyrics
and music than ever before. Accord-
ing to E. Mortimer Shuter, director of
the opera, this year's book will offer
a better vehicle than any he has used
heretofore.
Has Two Acts
There are only two acts to the
piece, the first with a setting in Hol-
land during.rthewtulip blouing time,
and the second in New York. The
dances and songs are worked into the
action often and, according to the di-
rector, should blend well.
Most of the dances for the piece
are now set, work having begun on
that phase of the opera last spring
under the direction of Roy Hoyer- It
is expected that Mr. Hoyer will be in
Ann Arbor again in the near future
to put the finishing touches on this
work and to set a few novelty steps.
The positions in the cast and chorus
are now being filled by the director
from the large number of tryouts who
have appeared, but work has been de-
layed on this in order that men may
be picked who will fit into the various
partz.
Opens Here Dee. 4
The production will open here Dec.
4 at the Mimes theater where it will
play on Monday night only. It will
start atthe Whitneyhon 'Tuesday,
Dec. 5 and play for the rest of the
week. Only about eight weeks now
remain before the first performance
and work on the piece has begun in
earnes w,
Work on the posters for this year's
opera will begin on Monday when
Mr. Shuter will meet all men who are
interested in entering the contest at
5 o'clock in his office in the Mimes
theater. All men who plan to enter
should get in touch with Mr. Shuter
on or before this time.
'Ensian Stages
Proster Contest

NEW ACT ADDED TO MIMES THEATER PROGRAM

Substitution of Dewey, '23, Also An.
nounced For Tonight
One more act has been added to the
week-end program at the Mimes thea-
ter, making six acts in all -which will
appear at the theater tonight and to-
-morrow. "The Dream Waltz" featur-
ing Gordon Weir, '24, anid Donald Ba-
chome, '24, is the name of the new
act. Thomas Dewey, '23, will take
the place of the Midnight Sons quar-
RESULTS
Have you ever advertised in
the classified columns of The
Daily? If you have, it's safe to
say that you know what Results
are. "Results" means not only
answers, but also a sale, or
renting. One answer to an ad
may be just as important to
you, if it makes a sale, as any

tette, which is prevented from ap-
pearing.
Weir and Bachome have both done
work-in campus dramatics previous-
ly. Weir did an oriental danbe at the
opening of the second act in last
year's opera, "Make It For Two," and
also appeared in the Ann Arbor pro-
duction of "Oh, Oh, Cindy" which
played here two years ago. He has
acted in several band bounces and
spotlight vaudevilles.
Dewey, who is a soloist, will be re-
membered as playing a part in the
1921 Union opera, "Top o' the' Morn-
in'" and has since appeared at sev-
eral private entertainments on the
campus.
Besides these two acts, there are
five others. A one act play under the
direction of Carl Guske, grad, and
called "In the Morgue" is the feature
of the program. James Johnson, '23,
with Rhodes' orchestra, Buckley C-
Robbins, '23, and C. James Dresbach,
'24, and company, and "The Argentine
Tango" by Germano and Feinseth,

Indian trinkets of great interestr
have been found'on a body which was
unearthed from. a gravel pit near
Tecumseh in Lenaway county. This
pit was on the property of a former#
student of Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, for-
mer dean of the Homeopathetic school,
and the collection was presented,1
through him, to the University Mu-;
seumo.
This Indian represents the transi-
tion period in the history of the
American Indian between 'his first
encounter with the white man and his'
adoption of the white man's ways-
The archives of Lena*ay county
state that the earliest white inhabi-
tants arrived in '1824 when the white
population in Southern Michigan was
exceedingly sparse. With the advent
of the white man the bow and arrow
was replaced by the gun, and, as a
Chert arrowhead was found located
in the left breast, we have reason to
believe that this Indian was killed
some time previous to this period.
The body, in an excellent state of
preservation, was found lying some
three feet from the surface, surround-
'ed by a collection of wampum beads,
deeply stained bones of small ani-
mals, and even a suggestion of a
looking-glass.
1Mimes Stage Tryouts Planned
All men who worked last spring on,.

University extension credit courses
will be given this year in Detroit, Pon-
tiac, Birmingham, Lansing, and Flint,
beginning with the week of Oct. 16.
Requests were made this year for 23.
courses,, according to Prof. William
D. Henderson, director of the Univer-
sity extension division, but it was
found necessary to limit the number
to 15, of which 12 will be given this
semester, and three additional
courses next semester.
Of the 12 courses offered, seven are
to be given in Detroit. . The list in-
cludes courses in public speaking by
Prof. Ray K .Immel and Mr. George
D. ' Wilner; sociology, Dr. Nellie Per-
kins and Prof. Arthur E. Wood; psy-
chology, Prof. H. F. Adams; journal-
ism, Prof. John L. Brumm; English
literature, Prof. Solomon F. Ginger-
ich; and philosophy, Prof- P. Brand
Blanshard.
A course in rhetoric, and one in
political economy, will be given in
Flint by Prof. T. E. Rankin and Mr.
Paul D. Cahow, ,respectively. OnlyF
one course will be offered in the oth-
er three towns, Pontiac,. Birmingham,
and Lansing.
Last year a total of 14 courses were
given in Detroit, Battle Creek, High-
land Park, Jackson, and Saginaw.
Peace in Near East Seems Assured
London, Oct. 12.-Peace in the Near
East seems assured with the signing

Announcement has been made by
the management of the 1923 Mchi-
ganensian of a poster cotest. The
contest opens today, and will close
at midnight, Oct. 30, the prize being
one 1923 'Ensian or $5 in cash.
The purpose of the contest is to
choose a poster suitable for advertis-
ing purposes in the 'Ensian sales
campaign,, to' be held from Nov. 6 to
Nov. 11 incluively. No restrictions
are placed on the entrant except that
he be a regularly enrolled student of
the University. The individual may
choose any subject whatsoever so
long as it is suitable for the use to
which it will eventually be put.
The judges of the contest will be
Max Schrayer, '23E, Sheldon M.
Brown, '23, and Marion VanEvery,
'24, managing editor, business mana-
ger, and art editor, respectively, of
the 'Ensian.
KERR WILL SPEAK
HERE NEXT WEEK
Phillip Kerr, who was secretary to
Premier Lloyd George during the,
war ,will come here as a guest of
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves,toftthe political
science department, Oct. 19 or 20.
Professor Reeves has secured the not-
ed Englishman to speak under the
auspices of the political science de-
partment.
Kerr obtained his university educa-
tion at Oxford. With his extensive
studies and wide experience, he has
become an authority on international
politics. This summer, he spoke on
I "The British Outlook on the Interna-
tional Problem," in his stay at the
Williamstown Institute of Politics. It
was at this time that Professor
Reeves invited Kerr to speak at Mich-

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