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June 03, 1923 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. _ _
,

- .

fowers of State,
'lea Of Owosso Naturalist

iso, MIcOI., June 2-(By A.P.)-- ion of their beauty, the
lice fl. Brown of the local high the rushing wind and
biology department, an ardent brook which surrounds

green forest,
the sighing
them and

lover of wild flowers, has issued a plea
for greater thoughtfulness on the part
of persons who seek the woods and
meadows of Michigan during the
spring and summer.
Missi Brown urged that care be tk-
en not to injure the wild flower plants,
voicing the fear that unless such care
is taken there is a possibility that cer-
tain varieties of flowers will become
extinct in Michigan.
Her statement follows:
"In spring and summer the woods
and open country call, and especially
on pleasant days, the young and old
go forth from the city. It is a bless-
ing that the city bred boy and girl
may beconm familiar with the flowers
,and the birdss of the woodlands. There
Sp a great d eal of pleasure for the
flower lover to pick the beautiful blos-
soms not reayl ng that because of his
short lived enjoyment he may not be
4ble to find the 'wild flowers again in
this favoritd spot. Sometimes it is
Apt the picking of the flowers that de-
titroys the Aplants," but the method of
pitkingh Pants propagated by seeds
aire destroyed if all the flowers are car
ried '.ro , while plants propagated
by roots. are destroyed when the root
i pulled in picking.
"It is not only that the wild flowers
ate desroyed for future generations
when they are carelessly picked, but
there are ba ten fields laid waste to
the ravages of soil erosion. In un-
cultivated fields the .plants developing
from scattered seeds prevent
washing. In the woods the ground
plants serve to retain the moisture for
plant growth and prevent floods in
spring and the drying up of streams in
summer. Fires often destroy the
ground covering, and many years are
required for the formation' of humus
before wild flowers will develop agan.
"An educational campaign is being
conducted by the Wild Flower Pre-
servation Society of America to obtain
protectin of our native plants. In this
section of the conty flowersrmay be
classified in three general .groups.
"First: Those that should not be
picked, including Marsh and wild hon-
eysuckles, Indian pink, bird-foot vio-
let, Lobelia (cardinal flowers), gen-
tian, tA ling arbutus, Indian 'Die,
lady's slipper, dog-tooth violet, twin
flower, tMoth wart, toadflax and bell
wort.'
"Second: Those that may be picked
sparingly if the roots aie not disturb-
ed and plenty are left to go to seed,
includingg bloodroot, anemone, clinton-
ia, winter green, dogwood, all lillies,
trillium, false and true Solomon's seal,
phlox, pitcher plant, rose pink, spring
beauty, Dutchman's breeches, squirrel
corn, wild geranium and bitter sweet.
"Third:Those that may be picked
freely without danger of extermin -
tion, including aster, arrow leaf, black-
eyed Susan, buttercups, cowslips, blue
weed, boneset, blazing star, bouncing
bet, sweet clover, beggar weed, poke
weed, evening primrose, foxglove, fir
weed, ground ivy, Japanese honeysc:-{
kle, milkweed, morning glory, mus-
tard, yarrow and daisy.
From one of the circulars of the
New England society is taken an ex-
cellent admonition: 'Study the rare
flowers in t he field without destroying
them, and take home with you a vis-

which is a vital part of their wild,
free life. And as you hang these pic-
tures on Memories' walls to desire and
enjoy again and again, you will have
the added pleasure of knowing that
these lives still continue in their nat-
ive haunts to be admired and loved
by all who seek to know them.' Those
who follow this excellent admonition
J will be doing no more than their sim-
ple duty as good citizens."
AT THE THEA TERS.

action takes place in present day Lon-
don instead of the early nineties when
the novel was written. The cast in-
cludes, Richard Dix as John Storm,
Mae Busch as Glory Quayle, the girl
John loves, Phyllis Haver, as Polly
Love, and Gareth Hughes as Brother'
Paul.
On Friday and Saturday the feature
will be "Fatal Millions," with Viola
Dana.
Wuerth .
The motion picture dramatization of
Charles G. Norris' novel, "Brass," is
offered at the Wuerth from Sundayl
through Wednesday. In this novel of
marriage and divorce Marie Prevost
has the leading role as the frivolous
wife who feels her husband neglects
Ther because their married life does
not consist of perpetual cabareting.
Monte Blue is the husband Philin

mutual understanding with his wife.
The return engagement, by request,
of Douglas Fairbaiks' productior
"Robin Hood" is booked for the re-
mainder of the week, beginning Thurs-
day. "Robin Hood" will be shown a#
a 35 cent price as against the 75 cent
'price asked at the initiat. showing. Of
interest to Ann Arbo- the announce-
ment that Sir Guy Gi jbnurne, the vil-
lain of the story, is payed by Pau
Dickey, '0G1. While at Michigan he
played halfback on the football team
in 1903, 1904, and 1905.
Arcade
The genial Walter Hliers comes here
on Sunday in "Sixty Cents. an Hour."
The story is that of a soda-jerker, a
fat young man working on a slim sal-
ary, who finds a way to mdake a for-
tune, and incidentally marry the bank-
er's daulhtor. The tomedv is bri-ht

the role of Mamie Smith, the banker's
daughter.
' )rplheuni
Col'e-k7 1, tre and Cullen Landis in
F'rsak .J. Others" is booked for
the Orphini for Sunday through
Tuesday. On Friday and Saturday the
feature is "Boston Blackie" with Wil-
liam Russell.
Holland has IBulding Boom
Holland, June 1-(By A.P.)-Nearly
100 building permits have been listed
during the first four months of the
present year, calling for an expendi-
ture of nearly $250,000.
RALLROAD INFQRM TIO
-AND-
RESERVAT! S ,
iB L be made by a Re -
sentative of.
TH E LOUISVILLE &
NASHVILLE R
Located at
THE MICHIGAN UNI.

Week Starting
TOMORROW
(uorday) June 4
LAST TONIGHT ki
THE

,rea , g i -1 t&I UU ~ t.''A. g&'X,1 .1 , ."..17 01J.*1 L
Majestic who is more intersted in real estate. throughout, " and scampers through a
Sir Hall Caine's "The Christian" speculations than in striving for a unique finish. Jacqueline Logan has
will be shown at the Majestic for a
five day run, beginning Sunday. The si !it 1l H llF!ll ll ltlH itl!Hll ll!t"
story is concerned with John Storm
a young Manxman, who becomes a
Christian Socialist and determines to
live as Christ would were he here on 'Bdt Lik
earth. The period of the story has IB i L k
been brought up to date so that the A Fortress..
Hartman's best reinforced
construction in a t r u n k
equipped with shoe box, a
*- drawer locking bar, cushion
top and hat drawer, is de-
cideoly the greatest trunk
value ever offered in the his-
tory of this store
-.
FULL LINE OF LEATHER GOODS
F. W. WILKINSON
Telephone 2 244 SdUTI[ 14I
There is no reason why you
should feel uneasy while in i
a taxi, providing it is a ,nrnr EM I Llf
Black and White. ii-____6,6_Epp

COMPANY
of Katherine Cecil Thurstons (:
T

A Vxtnstization

ASQ ERA
By JOHN HUNTR BOTI

JUNE 5TH AND
ii A. M. T08

6Th
P. M.

THE WEEK OF JUNE 1

4

1

............

.... _ . .
,.

qL.I7tlotlres
rim

- ME

1

FOR "YOUNGTQ ZiE

MADE BY EDERHEIMER STEIN COMPANY

Your safety is

our

chief

is open

concern.

Sunday from 5 to 1 p. m.

That is why we

hire drivers

in whom we can trust.

Come in before or after the Show

They
speed
limit.

will drive at any
you wish within the

for (among other things)

Real Chicken Salad

Every driver an escort.

Fudge Ice Cream that is Right
Coffee and our Special Fruit Cake
Chocolate with Whipped Cream
Candy without a rival

Dil (rd7
~\~r
FITFOR
ROAM 6YWbb.

Greatl
News
Our Men's Sale will continue
this week. - We still have a
fine selection of clothes left for
your approval- - True' there
are not as many clothes as a
week ago but fortunately the
buyin.g has beer. of such a na-
ture as to leave our stock se-
kction alm1ost complete.

330 Mu;pnubz, zippuziil 'irkr10 krabe

I Ii

g_,
=

_
=

yy

e i

Commencement

WHILE OUR STOCK LASTS WE WILL SELL AT TIE
PRICES ANNOUNCED

ill

L

fto

$29..50

$33"so

$38.50

Bring your Commencement Guests
to the Be tsy R oss or Busy Bee for
light lunches or cooling drinks.

We have never offered better values than these,

OTHER SPECIALS

k

imi

AND DURING EXAMS

come down yourself and

ehjoy a

few minutes in an atmosphere free
from finals and blue-books.

White Flannels at $10
Gaberdines, $25480
GET THESE CLOTHES BEFORE GOING HOME.
Our Usual Guarantee of Satisfaction Goes with Every Garment
To Our Many Friends
whom we may not see again, we wish the best
of lucle in Exams. and a happ summer vaca-
tion.

'I,

Two Shops --

One Efficient Management

BETSY ROSS

BUSY BEE
Q -n4-"3,Qf n c-

Tomn

Corbett,

I

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