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May 24, 1923 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-05-24

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THE MICHI

s

4

e mMlmn,.

ICAN D~AILY r- HURSDAY, MAY 24

alli 1umpi

..w...v..r... .......

K L

E TR 481 TRAC
rewz '41h List of AG by S~eudi~ng Ak
., cu' gfr cof ree Cr-
IW II AS 56 T0"T
Whwtrack athletes from the mid-
clie 'et gather on June 1 and 2 ik
AnirnA Atror', r the an ual Confeence
tneet, there will be in al probability
the biggest collection of cinder path
tnen ltat has ever invaded Ferry: field,
acco diig to all information -available
at tWpresent time. Siteen different
lnstfttions of the central states have
ete eo a total of 481 erformers for i
cite ag air, and ith some of their l
nu Rer reputed t© be the greatest in
years t.'seems crtainthat oe or more
tna$sre ounid to totter and crash
Una, Il ed
7 W~the <grot4p with the highest
t4 i tries s teUniversity'of
ow $ :which is sendin g 60 athletes to
be:Wolverine camp. -Close behind the
F-Iawk iintotal entries is Michi-
ang ith r56, Whlile. ot of the Unver-
cIty of 11ndaiaa will cme: a total of
54 mn, ready tot com:t. for the Fig
r~ith in the list is Oho State uni-
er ~ ,thze Buckeyes palanni g to send
6.4' 8 track atltes, and Wscon-
in eomes next witfo a list that totals
R. Clse on the heels of the "Cardin-
it ri pint of -numerical strength, but
indoubtedly one of the three chiefI
4onteners for the title, is Illinois with
f9 oe more entry than will be sent
y Wn.ieota.
lItotre Dame, Missouri Enter
The University of , hlcago is eighth
with an, entry list omrising 35 mien.
[ is a comparatively long jump from
his tot al to the -number entered by
he flst of the non,Conference schools,
qotre Dame, with 2, and it is an even
reater, drop to Northwestern with
2. "fchigant Agricultural college will
dn its hopes for pints upon 17 run-
tern -and the 'university of Missouri
wifll look to but 14 men to garner
narkirs. Purdlue, with one sensa
Jonal -runner out of the lot, will ship
[a tracksters to the local camp. The.
remaining trio of teams ary Drae,
W'ashinigtoh of St. Louis and West-
wn State Nrmal, with five, four, and
hree 'respecti'ey.
INf FHRFOREIGN PAS
Paris, May 23-(By AP.)-Count de
lailet-Latour. member of the Inter-
ational Olympic Committee, has re-
turned from an extended tour of South
rerica and gives an enthusiastic ac-
,mint of the progress made by South
4tmdriban countries n sports o' all
:iuds and their expectations for the
earl~ 3;924 Olympic Games.
"BIrailians lead in rowig .and
wimminng,'"lie says, "sports Which
~re favored by their wonderful ;cli-.
eate; :agile and elegant, the Are-
,inians are the best sprintes; .the
"ilians, robut and powerful moti-
amn men, are supreme in distance run-
rig; the Uruguayans are the best
ixanized as far' as method and tr~in-
ng is concerned, and their football is
he best in South America. Some of
hte records made in the sprints and
ni d e d s a c s sh w s c m ryents over the previous best marks'
fat the South American nations may
%ixpet-to be honorably represented
lu Paris in 1924."'

11innesota Professors Populilr
More than 100 Minnesota 'high
schools will be supplied with . com-
nencemnent speakers by the extension.
Wlvsion of the University of Minnesota
his spring. Some of the faculty men
ave become great favorites through-
)ut the state through giving these
;miencement addresses.

MPSEW Y TO TRAIN AT GREA T FALLS,
GIBI3ONS ON SITE, FR SHELII BO UT
444
SWYOM NQ I

I-I

Y. M. C. A. building at GrNat Falls, Mont, where it Is said Dempsey will do
of Shelby, tolnvil eIVI1e boait will be held. V iew of site of bout (arrow
and map shivwing locationi of Shelby anud Great Falls.

(By Norman E. Brown)
The Dempsey-Gibbons fight, if it
comes off, per 'schedule, will dtraw na-
tionwide attention to more than one
western town. According. to. reports
from the scene of the proposed battle
at Shelby, Mont., Independence. day,
Dempsey wil become a resident of the
city ofGreat Falls, some distance
south of Shelby, while training to de-
fend his title.1
Great Falls boasts of an up-to-datet
Y. M. C. A. building with all modern I
training -cilities, which. is one reas-}

on ftor the expected selection of that.
location for Dempsey's camp, and it is
believvd, he gill do much of his indoor
training at this "Y" building'.
Gibbons, according to present plans,f
will train at ' or near Shelby, where
the home folk ca.n look him -over daily.s
Both caipps will be accessible to vis-t
Itors from the wealthy oil fields andl
townS..
Many interesting, facts concerning
thltle oil mecca of Shelby come to
} igtas the bout is arranged.
The town Was named after Peter
IPaul Shelby, one of the 'pioneer trans-
} continental 'railroad builders of the

part of is training; 3613i street
PAIN to nar.al amphitheater)
United States, according to hi's daught-
er, Mrs. F.' 3. Schinoldt, resident ofj
Cleveland, 0. , $elby made a '700-nmile
trip north from the main line of the
Union. Pacific to prospect for a route
leading into Montana. Later Shelby
became vice-president.. of the Great
Northern railroad a~kd helped pushj
that road through untraveled port~r
of the great west. It .was .during ta
time that the town of Shelby,' on. the
G~reat Northern line, was named aft-
er him.:
Recent oil discoveries, have -turned
the town Into one of the main 'ol
Centers' of the west.

O HOgldin) ISter Severe Loeing to B lck ye
Y'elin41gs, 93 1- to 13 24,; Dose
to 1111111, 67 to ' 9~
G IlUMG(AX W!EAtli IN PA;'SIIES;
S TRQONG I P1STNC1 EVENTS
Coach Arcate Hahn's yearling~ squad;
overwlelmed Oio State's freshman l
team in a telegr,, phic eet yesterdayl
93 1-3 points to 43 2-3. The WNolverine
frosh, however, wser3 defeated by the
lllino~s first year ri, n, also comppet-
ing via telegraph, 67 points to 59.
Illinois~ proved :superior to Michi-
gan in the dashes, "winning the 100,
220, and 440. whiile t q half mile,, the
Mile, and the two mile races werej
captured by 1lalh runners. Oi
'State defeated M~ilhi ,A -in the half'
mile.
The retirni of the meets Nvitb "Xis-,
consin, who twaA easlIy C 3featedt,and
Iowa vwill be published !S1 tomorrow's
Daily.
The summary:
100 yard dlash-Michigan: Feinsing-
er; 10.2; Rockwell, 10.3; Merriman.
10,5. Illinoia: Shock, 10 .flat; Yar-
nell1, 1 0.2; H-oeber, 10.4. Ohio State:
Donavan,, 10.3, Snyder,' 10.0; WorIe,
220 yard dash-JMichigan: Feinsin~g-
er, 22.4; Boxer, 22.1'; Merriman, 22.9.
jIllinois : Shocki, 22.1;. Cox, 22.3; Me-
Dill, 23 fiat. Ohio Sta"te: Donovan,
23 flat; Sn yder, 23.;; Bower, 23.7.
440 yard dash--Michigan: Freyb erg,
52.4; B, R11ock well, 52.7; Cole, 4'3.5.1
Illinois: Mann, 52.2; YVates, 52.8;:VMe-~
hock, 53.. Ohio State: Bevan, 51.8;
Rogers, 53.8; Bower, 54.
RSO yai~d run-* ichiga is Freyberg,
2:013.3; Phigerle, '2:03.3; Croshko,
2:04.4. Illinois: Vance, 2:08,4; Pow-
erei,2:8; Roth, 2.10. E1=io State:
Bevan, 2 :02;. Johnson,, 2:05.8; vlaid,
2:06"
Mile rnn-Michigan: MAike Reinke,
4:30 .; Murray, 4:42. Illinois: An- a
drews; 4:39; Greenleaf, 4:46; Ridge,
4:i58. Ohio State: Arnold; 4:41.5;
Fislier, 4:48.3; Robe,,, 41:50.,6,.
Two amile run-Michigan: Hicks,
10:00.5; .Mason, '10.09.8; Richards,
10:40.4.= Illinois: Dermody, 10:32;
Barnes, 10:3'7.6f; Wykoff," 11:11.4.
Ohio State: Demboskie, 10.:13.5;, Black,
10:14.4'; Kent, 10:27.
F-L.gh hurdles-M'ichigan7: SniderI
1f).3; McCoy, 17.3. Illinois: Weinr
15:.; Cox;,.16.2; Wildmian, 16.4. Ohio
State: Guthrie, 16.2;. Goodman, 18.1.1
LON,,Hurdles-Michigan: Frank, 23.-
6; Snider, 26.7; Brown. 27.4.. Illi-
~nois: Yarnell, 25.6; Wallace, .25.$;
Watkins, 26.4. Ohio State: Guthrie,
26.2; Carver, '28.1; Lampert, 29.1.
High jump-Michigan: McCain, ,5
feet 8 5-8 inches ; Viant, 5 feet 6
'1?e; Snrider and Stevens, 5 feet 4
inches.. Illinois: Semper and Robin-
(Continued on Page SeNv1a)
Get good values cheap, thru thi
Classified columns.-.Adv.

New York ................ 4 8 0
Toney and Clemons; Bentley anid
ISnyder.
R IIE
Cinciiunati..............1652'
l:3rooklyn.........7 10 3
Rixey and Win go; Cad ore and Thy-
I br.
Fraternity Ruys House
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity .has ac-
quired, the Lapointe property on
Washtenaxv avenue nd will move~in at
the beginning of the regular school
term ntext fall., 5

RRHE
Boston. .........".....8 8 2
Cle-;elaud. ...... ...6 14 4
MurraF'y, Qulbin, Devovrme!r alid Pin-
1iih; Slaitite, Met_,vier, Smith and
No etlLcr ceuld
1Z +fbln"",League
Pittsburg...... .....7 14 1
fPhiladelphia... .......G 11 21
Baghby, Kuh4 and Schidrt; Head andd
iI!nne.
Bost~on .... ... ........ 12 11
D)umo'vitch, Osborn and HaZrtnett;j
,F411iigim, McNamara and O'Neill.

R H J2.A:.3

l
;:
)
!
I
1

IINTRAMUIRAL TRYOUJTS FoRt
NEXT YEAR ARE WN~TED
1Tryouts for intramural activi-
Ities are wanted immediately.
I'Eight assistant maniagers are to
Ibe selected for next year. All
mon- interested in this branch o9f
) orkc should get in touch w-ith f
Ithe Intramural department, 2268, 1
at once.

St. Louis.............

COACH lAHIR WESL9O0
WEEDINGOUT PROCESS
iR; 1 1 BSEBALL CREW BE DUC
bJ) TO 25; LITKELY MATERIAL
DEVELOPWS
Coach~ Mather's newly made sopho-
more baiseball chasers. were sent
throu.gh another heavy session yes-
terday ?tternoon. With only a weep
c* practice left, the Coach is putting,
the yearlings through their paces in
rapi(l fashion. A heavy fielding -.n
batt~ng session was followed by a f'ast
game in whiich several sets of players
took part. - While the fielding of the
freshmen is fairly good, the clubbing
is3 fatr from heavy, and Mather is try-
ing to develop a few good hIttera.
Some of the frosh are imprevi~ng
rapidly and may show good stuff, an
may pessbly show Varsity ability. Wil-
son, a lanky "irst-sacker, is a nice
hitter and takes a. good cut at the
ball. He is a, fair fielder, but handles
himnself rather awkwvardly, and is al-
most sure to iimpxrove . with good in-
struct ion. Gehringer , third saclei,
seems sure of ',ls Iposition on the frosh
squad, as does Wle at short. If
'White can improve his hitting hie has
a good chance to mnake the Varsity in
(Continuedl on Page Se~ven)

2

__._ ---4

_ 3-.=

T,1 kailor-made Summer Suits

Intramural It msI
Interest among the fans supporting
the baseball teanis in the class league
has increased sime. tile -eliminations
have' narrowed down to the semi-fin-
als. The four teamns scheduled to
play in the semi-finals will meet in two1
games at 5 o'clock, tomorrow evening,
on south F erry field.
The teams. are scheduled Mto linaup
as follow,"s: dents vs. senior lies; med-
ics vs. ar'chitectt. Winners of these
contests will play at 5, o'clock, Mon-
day afternoon, for: the' championship.
The All -camnpus horseshoe singles
xill go into the semi-final °rounq to-
morrow. McKechnie, 558V, vs. Ken-
nedy, 236, hiave not played their match
in the fifth round yet and will be un-
able to play until this aftternoon. The
winner of this match will meet Nich-
'ols, 753, in the first game, while Track-
e tt, 3010J, will engage Elsen rberg, 959,'
in the second gaime.
The race for the 'fraternity athlet-
ic cup, awarded annually to the fra-
'ternity gaining the most points inx the
sports held under the auspices of= the
Intramural department, has narrowed
down consderably during the past few.
weeks.
As the race now stands Beta Theta
P1 has the best chance of winning
the cup., Although they. made a poor
showing in baseball, their-'nearest op-
ponents, Phi Sigma Kappa and Phi
Sigma Delta. also gained but little, Phi
Sigmia Kappa being awarded 15 points
more than beta. Theta Pf, Aw,,ile Phil

Sigma Delta and Beta Theta Pi both
received- the samve.
Phi Gamma Delta. and Kappa Beta
P'sI hive .been 'th e headliners in base-1
ball, and 'horeshoe. The former is
'now in the finals round wvith hi Psi
[Phi for 'the championship of the fa
ternity. baseball teams and it looks asI
though they will will the tilt if' they
maintain their past prowess in the,
coining gaime. Kappa Beta Psi, part-
ly thiroughl the efforts of McKeehnie,,
last y;ear 's.All-camrputs horeshoo chain-
pion anld somewhat through Ehres-
w;-r's abhiity, had but little trouble in
winning the, championship in horse -
shoe.
Kappa Beta Psi will be awarded u
silver ' loving cup for winning. the
hor'seshoe championship, but the 75
points received alori-,.with it ili help
them but little in overcoming the lead
now held by the leading fraternities in
the athletic cup race. The situation!
is the same with Phi Ganina: Delta
and Xi Psi Phi,-as both houses' failed.
to finie4h well in the shorts held last
fall azid winter.
As a result the outcome of bare-
ball, And Horseshoe will have little ef-
fect on the anal standings in the race
and everything depends upon the pre-
sent runners-up making s splendid
sho-wing in "the' coming track mneet.
IHere again Beta Theta Pi has dan ger-
ous; nlen, to offer, as opposition to any-
thing the other houses may enter. The
tennis meet is ',fairly well along, but
the outcome is so uncertain that it is
not feasible o predict what effect it
may have on the final standings.
In the fourth round of the All-cam-
pus tennis singles the followingt
matches are scheduled .and must be

in by 5 o'clock, this evening: Hicks,
1324 J, vs. Greiner, 909; Fox, 2824I,
vs. Zook",*168f( H; Plutynski, 2475 i1, vs.
winner Jerome-Crane match', Schaef-
er, 236, vs. Goldsmith, -3142 R. The
winners of the above matches will
then 'be in the semi-final s which will
be played off tomorrow. The finals
will then be run, off Saturday.
Following, are the matches sched-
uled for the third 'round of. the All-
campus tennis doubles: Garber-Hicks,
1.324 J,' vs. Wentworth-B rske, 2106
M; McKnight-parfner, 1597 24P s.
Barnes-Briggs, 2738; Morris-Loose,
2451, vs. Birk;-Flowers; 1166. The
Iwinners of the above matches w1i
') play in the semi-.Finals tonmorrow. Th~e
inals will be played on Saturiday.
In the fourth round of the' Inter-
frateirnity tennis tournament the fol-
lowing matches are scheduled and(
must beplayed today: Sigma Chi vs.
Psi Upsilon; Masama vs. kappa Nu.
This will then bring this 'tournament
Vup to the semi-finals which wI'll be
iplayed tomorrow. The finals are fiche-,
doled for Saturday.
IIORNBERIER TO RUN l N NA.
FIONU LINTERSCR.OLAkSTICS

$17950

I 195

Materials used are genuine English
priestlys and. Havana cloth. High
grade cut-to-measure Flannel Troum-
sers

THlE INTERSTATE TAILORS
Call at American hotel or phone 123'

0

U,

VIC;TOik ALLMENDI1tGER
PIANO TUTNING
S'thoolj of ]Musjc Tuner
PhO0NE 11065
Offie at R~es., 418 N. Div~iSon St.

Theodore Horuberger, of Ann Arbor,
high school, will represent his school
Friday and Saturday at the national,
interscholastic track anq field meet at
Chicago. Hornberger is one of the'
leading high school milers in the' west,
hzaving won the event in the Michigan
interscholastics 'last Saturday, doing
the distance in 4:35.9.

IT COSTS NO. )'IRE FORl
RIDER'S
SKILLED 1TEN SIIVI"' .

Students Supply Store

111 South University Ave.

1

Engineers' .~ Architects' Materials
Stationery, F7ountain Pens,- Loose Leaf Books
Cameras and Sup plies
Candies, Laundry Agency, T 'baccas

I We don't make. all the Donuts in Ann Arboir
But we 'make Ann Arbor's'JBest Doinxts.
..There's adiference"
CA. L 664,.
SANN ARBOR~ CREAME RY ANN ARBOR, MllIH.
Z~123W . Libety
- CUT' AND TAILORED Tr ;OUR' INDIVIDUAL SIZES N
ESPECIALLY. PRICED-
~FIFTY TO FIFTY-FIVE DOLLARS
-I
EXTRATROUSERS- $10 EXTRA

UN
l
Um

neBestBusin ess Career.
Is what every ambitious senior is
thinking about at \the present time,.
Lif inurnceisone of the best, one
of the most desirable, and one of the,
most satisfactory as a permanent
calling.
In. assets and volume of business,
life insurance is one of the three lead-
ing businesses of this country, yet the
field is comparatively under-developed.
Only 7 per cent of the economic value
of human life in the' United States is
covered by insurance. This gives arn
idea of the big field still to be worked,
especially business insurance for firms
and corporations.
As to remuneration: Reports of
college graduates who have, entered
business indicate that life insurance is
at the very top as a soure of income.
Now is. the time for you to consider
what you are going to do after gradu-
ation. If you 'are ambitious and will-
ing to work hard and are interested
to knowv' about life insurance, address

.'

- ll

7

IUI

,..

esh stock and quick
-vice. Smoke with

THEL
GREY

FOR
YOUR
NOON LUNCH

Agency Department

iloll

"THE GREY SHOPS".

_: ?.?9 Ys ~ - - sw

II I

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