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October 11, 1922 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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men were asked what problems they
wished to consider.
Meetings of the groups will be an-
nounced from week to week, the exact
night of meeting for each group to be
determined by the group leader.
More than 150 freshmen were pres-
ent at the first larger group meeting
at which President Marion L. Burton
spoke. While not so many were in
attendance at the meeting last night,
it is thought that large numbers, will
respond to the invitation which the as-
sociation has issued to them.
George Hacker, '25, and Ross Mc-
Farland, '23, have done much to make
the work of the groups possible.
Receive Invitation from New Zealand
An invitation to send a representa-
tive of the University to the semi-cen-
tennial of Canterbury college, at
Christ Church, New Zealand has been
received in the office of Pres. Marion
L. Burton. The celebration will ex-
tend from May 13 to 15, 1923.
An alumnus delegate will be desig-
nated to represent the University.

Wayfarers Club Elects Officers ing of the Wayfarers club held last the O. S. U. game in a body. The
Officers were elected and plans foiI evening at the Union. Arrangements nual initiation banquet will be
the year were discussed at the meet- were made for the clubs attendance at ometime this month.
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U. S. S. Scorpion in Turkish waters
If the U. S. S. Scorpion could talk Jack London. Its career covers a per- and the crew held virtual prisoners
it would tell a tale of adventure that iod from the Spanish war to date. although the United States was not
would dd credit to a Jules Verne or|In 1914 it was seized by the Turks then in the war. - ;

Lmpressions aw... w 'e

I

MONUMENT ERECTED IN
HONOR OF EUGENE FIELD

CHICAGO CHILDREN AID)
COMMEMORATION OF
FAM~OUS POET

IN

I'

Arcade-"Manslaughter," a Cecil
B. De Mille production.
Majestic--"Prisoner of Zenda;"
Christie Educational picture;
comedy, "One Ol' Qat."
Orpheum-Patsy Ruth Miller
and Cullen Landis in "Watch
Your Step;" Masonic Drill pic-
tures.

AT THE THEATERS
Today-Screen.

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Oct. 9.-A monument to
Eugene Field, the "children's poet,"
was unveiled in Lincoln Park this af-
ternoon, commemorating, by its erec-
tion the interest of the children of
Chicago in the author of "Litte Boy
Blum," "Wynken, Blynken and Nod,"
and the rest of his series of lulla-
bye.
The children, through newspaper
funds, raised nearly $10,000 toward
the cost of memorial, the remainder
being donated by the Ferguson Fund,
a trust founded by its donor for the
erection of statutes in the city's pub-
lic parks.
Two small ' grandchildren of 'the
poet, Jean Field Foster, and Robert
Field, nulled the cords which unveiled
the monument.
Melville E. Stone, counsellor and
former general manager of the As-
sociated Press, delivered the princi-
pal address. Mr. Stone, while asso-
ciated with Mr. Victor Lawson in the
publication of the Chicago Daily News,
brought the poetto Chicago from Den-
ver in 1883, and he remained with the
News until his death, in 1896..,
The memorial shows a brooding an-
gel hovering over two sleeping chil-
dren and dropping the sand of dreams
into their {eyes. Beneath, on one side
are carved the opening lines of the
poet's "Dutch Lullaby";
Wynken, Blynken and Nod one night
Sailed off in a wooden shoe-
Sailed on a river of crystal light
Into a sea of dew.
Opposite are four lines from the
"Sugar Plum Tree":
Have you ever heard of the Sugar
Plum Tree?
'Tis a marvel of great renown,
It blooms on the shore of the lolli-
pop sea
In the garden of Shut Eye 'Town.
A fountain, marble benches and the
plain inscription, "To 'Eugene Field"
completed the memorial. It was"de-
signed by Edward McCarton, of New
York City. Slason Thompson, a nevs-
paper friend of Mr. Field's Chicago
days, presided. Besides Mr. Stone, the
Rev. William E. Barton also spoke,
and Mrs. Louise ,HarrisonSlade sang
the "Dutch Lullaby."
HEALTH EXPERTS TO ATTEND
CONTVENTION IN CLEVELAND
Prof. W. C. Hoad, Dr. Philip Hadley,
of the Hygeinic laboratory, Dr. Her-
bert W. Emerson, of the Pasteur In-
stitute ;Miss Barbara M. Bartlett, and
Dr. C. C. Parnall, of the University
Hospital; Dr. Warren E. Forsythe and
Dr. Eloise Walker, of the Health serv-
ice; Prof. John'Sundwall, director of
Student's Physical Welfare; Dr. M.
13. Smith, and Gardner S. Williams are
expected to attend the fifty-first an-
nual meting of the American Public
Iealth association, at Cleveland, Oct.
16 to 19.

S. CG AoHOLDS FIRST'
of DISCUSSION GROUPS
PROF. F. N. MENEFEE ADDRESSES
YEARLINGS AT INITIAL
MEETING
A definite step was taken by the
Student Christian association towards
making vital in . the University
Christian work when it held the first
round of a discussion series last night
in which a large number of fresh-
men met in groups with-a number of
upperclassmen. Discussicin groupl,
held weekly, will be headed by upper-
classmen who are active On the
campus, and who have done work of
such a nature as is required.
Prof. F. N. Menefee of the engi-
neering school addressed the group
before it split up into sections for
the group discussions. In the small
discussion group problems vital to
the yearling were considered such as
that of fraternities, leadership, hon-
or, and sportsmanship. The younger

YOUR
NOTE PAPER
JS YOU.

o en 4e o my 0ne1 , +
g~dbut if yp t'1
aid~e sget
the closer acq
would Closs
often be yot.
Gopod cloths dout m.
display-thymeaximb
wearer has comnio sense.

Wuerth-Charles Ray in "A
Tailor Made Man;" comedy
and Wuerth Orchestra.
This Week-Stage
Garrick (Detroit)-Eugene 0'-
Neill's "The Hairy Ape." [
Shubert-Michigan a(Detroit)-'
Bonstelle "ompany in "The
Tiger Rose." -,

You express your own person-
ality, your individuality by the
style, shape, color and quality
Df your correspondence paper
and envelopes. See our large
stock. From our variety you'll
find the letter paper you should
use. Fountain_- pens, pencils,
inks, blotters, etc.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Typewriter and Stationery
Store

The£t fm dmozxof
sity Brand is like
the second and all
ou~rs - becau~se they
are faulde"8

Wadhams & Co.

TWO STORES

STATE ST.

MAIN ST.

R C A D
COMING SUNDAY

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FIRST
NAT IONAL
BANK
ORGANIZED 1863
:: OLDEST BANK IN ANN ARBOR
OLDEST NATIONAL BANK IN MICHIGAN

Tickets

Exhausted

for

I

Choral

Union

Series

.1 '.1'

.. ' -11
'k.

Orders have been received in such large numbers that the Main Floor, the First Balcony
and the front half of the Second Balcony have been sold out. A' limited number of seats in the
Second Balcony remain at $4.50 and $5.00 each. These may be ordered so long as they last.
If any still remain, they will be offered to the general public at the School of Music, SATUR-
DAY, OCTOBER 14.
'rA

The;? Bank

of

4'c.

FOR THE

friendly

Service

Extra Concert Series
Good tickets remain on all floors as follows: Main Floor, $4.00 and $5.00; First Balcony,
$4.00 and $5.00; Second Balcony, $2.00 and $3.00. Mail orders will be selected in the order
of receipt.

HE bank of friendly

service - how

aptly

AR R

AD
SUNDAY

E

that describes our policy.
Service, prompt and effi-
cient, yet characterized
by a courtesy of convinc-

you to test this slogan
of ours. Bring us your
most involved business
problems.
You'll be astonished at
the many ways in which

Alfred Gortot, "A Second Paderewsk"in"a "pia"no recital, December4.
Ina Bourskaya, Russian Colorftura Soprano, soloist with the Detroit Orchestra, under
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, November 30.
Maurioe Dumesnil French Pianist, soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, under
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, February 19.

In this series five stupendous programs will be offered:

ing sincerity.

We ask

we can serve you.

Raoul Vidas,

French Violinist, soloist with Detroit Symphony Orchestra,
under VICTOR KOLAR, November 20.

.4

In a Popular Program,
Orchestra, bi a Popular

Kathryn Meisle,

American Contralto, soloist with the Detroit Symphony
Pre gram, under VICTOR KOLAR, January 15.

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank

Address orders to

Resources $5,600,000

Two Offices

s>

, 1 ' .B°

CHARLES A. SINK; Secretary
Ann Arbor, Michigan

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PA Muu

I WUMM I I1 USi

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