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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-11

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_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _T H E M IC H IG A N DA IL Y W E DAY, O

Pastor Avers Michigan Daily
And Bible Right Reading Diet
As a portrayer of human nature, day of many thousands of years ago_--
The Michigan Daily was classed with your ancestors were inhaling and ex- hi-des Seboir 'resentsIis 11m-
the .Bible in a sermon given Sunday haling as monotonously as we do in pressions of Oxford ellege
e rr i J-1922. So God told truths in the long 1Life
by Re,..HerbUrt AtlunsonJump, "as ago, and those truths are just as --
tor of the Congregational church. His pertinent today as they were then. JOUR'NALISTS llOLD FIRST
subject was, "The Bible An Up-to- ---- --- MEETING OF YEAR AT UNION
date Classic."
'"Read The Michigan Daily every V I0lLI LV Speaking before the initial lunch-!
W511rning 'but read the Bible every eon of the Students' Press club ati
ni t, admonished Re Jump. I HOUS SR the Union last night, Raloh Carson,
portrayed in both . If the modern '17, a Michigan Rhodes scholar, gave
journal tells us how oe Bush weak- the journalists his impressions of stu-
ed in the eighth, so the ancient lit- Andrew C. Beam, 23Ed., was elect- dent life at Oxford and comparod the
erature will tell how Saul weaken- cd speaker of the Adelphi house of conditions existing there with those
cd, adI David lost his grip and Solo- Reprscntatives for the coming year of his own. university, Michigan.
mcu went to the bad. A man isn't in xn executive session of the House Prof, F. N. Scott, head of the. Rhetoric
well educated these days unless he is in University Hall at 7:30 o'clock las'1 and Journalism department, precededl
decenly acquainted with the Chris-1 night, to succeed John .J. Gould, '24L, Mr. Caxson with a worth while talk,'
t in scriptures. I who was unable to return .to schoolj urging those who were taking up the
"isn't it remarkable that so ancient this year. Beam was given the ma- newspaper as a profession to become1
a classic as the Bible is so modern fority over Donald C. Cook, '24, and imbued with a spirit of real respon-
in its messag and, its usefulness? It Loyal, Wilson, '24, all three having sibility 'to the community and the en-
is like breathing. Breathing is a been nominated for the office at a' tir-e world.
very old-fashioned habit but it is a meeting of the' society last Tuesday Telling first of the historical back-.
vcry up-to-the-minute experienee. You evening. ground of Oxford, Mr. Carson stat-.
cant keep alive on the breaths you 'wIn the society's first debate of the ed: "Antiquity is the prime character
drew yesterday, and yet in a yester- year immediately preceding the elec- and keynote of Oxford," said Mr. Car-
tion, Wilfred Heeking, '24L, and Ly- son. "Tle'founding of this university
man Glasgow, '25 ripresenting the dates back over a thousand years, al-1
aI ffirmative, won a unanimous decision though the actual date can hardly be

News From The

Berkeley-After the closest decision'
in years the judges have chosen
'Thing of Dust" for the Partheneia,
the university annual play. This year
the play will be staged in a new
place, the Grove theater to the north
of the Greek' theater has been selected
for the setting.
Puidue--Plans for the Cadet Hop,
the annual uilitary ball, are being
made and bids from various orchestras
throughout the state are already be-
ngyi re.ivcd fcr tie affair. The
dance is an all-university affair and
i considered one of the big events
of the year.
,MniI)cJsapi a -Two publicity men
men for the Minnesota. Daily were ar-
rested Monday for running a steam
calliope around the university cam-
pus advertising the school paper. The
Black .aria, so-called by the stu-
dents, was covered with posters enti-
tled "Have music in your home and
the Minnesota Daily in your P. 0.
Box." As the two men were arrest-
ed and mnarched to the jail, hundreds
of students followed the "bluejack-
et s," bcotmng and jeering them.
Columibu s- The annual freshmen
bonfire was held on Ohio field last
Friday, when an old university tra-
dition was again re-enacted, that of
the freshmen burning up every stray
Good Plumbers
are an Asset
to Ann Arbor"
Our plumbers are more
than ordinary mechanics.
They ark all men of
plumbing experience.
Their work is not only
subject to our approval,.
but is under the super-
vision of the state and
municipal board of
halth as well.
For obvious reasons, doc-
tors and dentists are li-
tensed. For the same
reasons so are plumbers.

,tC lle es { Ann Arlbor, Oct. 28, for the Mlichi-
n l9v' dth'tv'.P-i-Illinois game. The Detroit alum-
ci of the university have petitioned
the band that it come and are urging
barrel and piece of wood about the]thie'..student body to defray a part
camius, and gathering it together of the expenses. The alumni, it is
for a huge lire. Speeches were made said, are planning to go to the game
by prominent men in the school, songs at Ann Arbor in a body, and wish the
and cheers given after which the en- band to lead them in a parade there
tire class of yearlings formed a night- as well as play at the game.
shirt parade and marched around_
the campus. Am still in business and ready to
banipaign-Director A. "A. Hard- serve my did friends and patrons as
ing of the university band is urg always. Julian R. Trejanowski, U. of
that the students show interest in M" Barber Shop, 1110 So. University.-.
backing the band on its proposed trip Ad'.

Micigan Th^iv and Chim

) --.

ALICE LAKE
U I -
"KISSES"
EDDIE POLO
-IN -
"CAP'N KIDD"
STAR COMEDY

WOOL SOCKS
VAN BOVEN AND CRESS
1107 8OUT1I UNIVERSITY AVENUE

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J U UIIIi IJUILU II
DET ROIT_1DEDICATIO'N
INER MEl)1ATE SC1IOOIL NAMED
AFTER FORMER MIC IGAN
PRESIDENT
President Emeritus Henry ' B.
Hutchins will be honored in Detroit.
Oct. 26, when the University of Mich-
igan 'club of that city will have charge
of the dedication of the new Henry
B. Hutchins intermediate school. The
pr'ogram will be in charge of Judge
Alexis B. AngelI and Frank Cody,
superintendent of schools in Detroit.
Regent .James O. Murfin of the Uni-
-versity will speak at the exercises.
Invitations have been sent to Pres-,
ident Marion L. Burton, Dr. IHenry B.
Hutchins pnd the deans of the sev-
eral colleegs to appear at the cere-

over Andrew C. Beam, '23Ed., and
Gilbert Appelhof, '23, on the question
"PResolved, that Hill auditorium
she'uld be opened to political discus-
sions of the day."
Seven tryouts for .membership in
the society were heard during the
course of the evening,
FRESHMAN FEATURED IN NEW
CHIMES ISSUE OUT TODAY
(Continued frdft Page One)
pus interest in the present number
are "A Dissection of the High Brow"
by Pres. Marion L. Burton, and "Slim
Spiral the Jaundice Maker" by George
B. Vincent, president of the Rockefel-
ler Foundation.
Fiction is contained in three stor-
ies, "Fortitude" by Marjorie Kerr, '24;
"The Four Leaf Clover" by Hardy.
Hoover; and "The Curse of the Leff-

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mony. State Superintendent T. E. 1u wels" by Donald oney, '24.
Johnson is also expected to be pres -Other articles of campus interest
ent. that will be contained in the issue are:

At the dedication ceremonies the
school will be presented with a por-
trait of Dr. Hutchins,. painted by C.
M. Hayes. The University of Michi-
gan club will donate the painting.

'The Governing Body at Michigan" by
Vernon Hillery, '23, president of the
Student council; "Student Government
--So Called" by an annonymous stu-
dent; "Princeton and the Development
of Polo" by Alton Hall, captain of the
Princeton team; and ."Selling Michi-
gan" by James Fry, '22.

REPUBLICAN CLUB,
TO HOLD MEETING

cited,. there being so many supposed
foundings." Mr. Carson told of the
campus there, stating that there were
22 colleges with about 150 students in
each college, with all of the buildings I
constructed in quadrangles. "I be-
lieve," said Mr. Carbon, "that this sys-
tem of quadrangular type of architec-
ture is satisfactory and that the!
building of the new Law dormitories
is the first step at Michigan towards
this system." Continuing, he spoke
of intellectual activity as being the
true Oxford atmosphere, stressing the
fact that the English students at Ox-
ford were such intelligent conversa-
tionalists, especially concerning Eng-
lish politics.
Mr. Carson impressed upon his lis-
teners' that the English were not as
many Americans considered them.
"They have their high type of humorj
and are especially quick at repartee,l
and are not as slow to 'see through'I
a bit of humor as most Americans
think." He told of the great num-
ber of bookshops in Oxford, compar-1
ing them with the three or four in
Ann Arbor. "It is admitted by stu-
dents at Oxford that our American!
universities surpass the old institu-
tions of England in many respects,"
said Mr. Carson. "The English arc
aware that they cannot educate all
and consequently restrict the size of
their universities." Co-education at
Oxford is practically a new thing and
women are not viewed with any great
degree ,of friendliness.. As a final
note, Mr. Carson expressed the belief
that America should enter into for-
eign affairs and the League of Na-
tions. "The question," he said, "is
not how will America enter into such
affairs, but when."
Professor Scott chose as his sub-
ject, "Not That It Matters," and em-
phasized the fact that it does matter
what stepD the newspaper man takes
filling up the pages of his paper.
"The newspaper," said Professor
Scott, "accomplishes the shaping of
the body politic and everything does
matter." A spirit of facetious irre-
sponsibility is too liable to be pres-
ent in the modern and pre-modern
newspaper office. It is just this spir-
it that we should work against," con-
tinued Professor Scott. "We must
bring about a change of this spirit
by acquainting all groups of people
in this world with each other by
means of the newspaer," concluded
Professor Scott.
At the close of the meeting Mr.
raror vp's unanimously elected an
1oncrary niember of the Students'
Press club, and was presented a mem-
bership card to that organization.

We are showing many smart new versions of black
satin pumps. Some styles have the Junior Spanish
heel while others have the Louis heel. The old
Colonial style with the tongue effect is to be found
among the satin pumps. Black satinm5
pumps are priced..............
Especially to match the brown 1rocks are the new
satin and hrtiebade p umps of browNL h ' They come
in a two-strap style with a Louis heel that makes
them vry attractive for wear with leyd
long, fashionable frocks. TJhey arc priced ,

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New Footwear
W HEREVER tastefully - dressed, faultlessly -
groomed women gather, there one sees the
type of footwear we sponsor - footwear.of good
style, good quality and good taste. New models are
arriving every day, reflecting the latest 'of the sea-
son's modes, narked distinction and much feminine
charm.

tROESBECK ASKS FOR POWER

/

Republicans'oft the University of
Michigan will gather at the first meet- I
ing of the Republican club for the year'
to be held at 7:30 o'ciodk tonight in
the Reading room of the Union. It is
planned to make this first meeting in
the form of a large mass meeting in
which all members and prospective
mnembers will join.
It is largely the object of this first
meeting to get new members in the
club, those in charge point out. Mem-
bership is oven to all students .in the
University who are Republicans.
The work of the club that will be
carried out is an extensive program
this year and is to familiarize students
with the Republican form of govern-
ment and. o interest them in politics.
Practical work on the various' cam-
paigns in state elections will be done
in giving the members experience.
LLOYD, t< EORGE WILL NOT
RESiCN HIS PREMIESIHI'P

TO CONTROL FUEL OF STATE
(Continued from Page One)
said a considerable shortage of anth-
racite {and bituminious coal exists as
the result of the coal and rail strikes,
and it was the duty of the state to
aid in securing an adequate supply
and to prohibit profiteering. He de-
clared this could only be obtained
thrqugh appropriate legislation of
such a wholesome character as to im-
press .fairness upon dealers and con-
sumers alike.
Vounteer fair price committees can-
not adequately force an equitable dis-
tribution of fuel.
In both the house and senate there
seemed to be little decided sentiment
either for or against tl e measure.
That the session may continue into
next week became a probability when
it was decided to hold public hearings
on the measure.

THE HEALTH
OF ANN ARBOR
MUST BE
PRO TEC TED

Trim affairs are the College Girl oxfords of l rovn
or black calfskin! Their low, rubber heels make
them comfortable as well as smart and their fine
quality makes them practical. The girl who wears
these oxfords will be assured
of style! Priced.................... .JIJ

SEE US FOR
PILIMBING

211 South 4th A ve.
Phone 525

~1
60

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Las TeToay
Mimi

'Basketball Manager Tryouts Wanted
London' c. inrenion oyr Tryouts for Varsity basketball man-
gg hfas clearly no e tention of re- ager are asked to report in Varsity
sig;nmg office at the order of his num- locker room at 7 o'clock this evening
ros nwspaper critics. in Waterman gymnasium.
trary he is determined, to fight the m Wtea gyn__.
At -lazikieter on Saturday he is es
pected to make a vigorous reply to' Lose something? A classified in
these critics. Should there be a new the Daily will find it.-Adv.
crisis in the Near East this may entail
a changeig'his plans' In well inform- Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.
ed circles it is also stated that there
is no question of the dissolution of..
parliament at the present time. f

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NO ADVANCE N PRIGE

In answer to Caligula the Arcade
Barber Shop wishes to announce that
hereafter all co-eds will get double'
chances with their haircuts.-Adv. V
ki

MATINEE: 2:00-3:30
ADULTS -5C
](lD )IES - 10c

Japhn to Restore Ia Chow to China
Tsing Tao, Shantung, Oct. 10.-Japan
has decided. to restore the lease hold
of Kia Chow to China, December 2.
On that date Japanese troops will
withdraw, civil and military authority
in the Kia Chow district will be handed
over to China, and the Chinese flagI
will be hoisted for the first time since
1898.
Got a room to rent? A Daily classi.
fied ad will find a roomer.-Adv.

Mt
. !3

This is Charles Ray's first pic-
ture for The United Artists-
the company which insists on
the quality of the entertainment
above all else.

;Charles Ras 1
an'
- s poduced ~
f 'r edery itA sngrOmae
. tlook.s
ii

i

This represents Charles Ray's
most pretentious effort and his
greatest achievement. This is;
not idle praise but is acclaimed
by the critics s Master-
piece.
-- OMING SOON--
"FREE AIR"

NO ADVANCE IN PRICE

.. . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . .

EVENING: 7:0-8:45
ADULTS - 20c
KIDDHES - 10c

United Artists Releases
Mary Pickford,
Douglas Fairbanks,

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CO-11

C D E
ING SUNDAY

I

by Sinclair Lewis,

Good

Food

Well Cooked

D. W. Griffith,
George Arliss,

author of "Main Street"

Service

a la

carte:

and now

De t
IQ

hasse

... ,,
.
., ..,

"MY

Open
7:30

7:0 0

a. m.

to

Charles Ray's Pictures.

11

p .

mI.

Enjoy

h I ..

Ray's First
Super - Special
Nine Reels

WILD IRISH ROSE"

AND

meal time at

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r

T.A PPV QPMIIflT

nI

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