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October 10, 1922 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Ti

'I AY, 04

- -

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference FEditorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for 'republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
En'erei at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 24t4 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, 960.,
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
ltft at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-.

MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL

City Editor...............James B. Young
Assistant City Editor...........Marion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman ......E. R. Meiss
Night>Editors-
Ralph Byers Harry Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J.E. Mack
L. :( .iershdorer R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor ............... II. McPixe
Sunday Magazine EIditor......Delbert Clark
Woie i's Lditor ..........Marion Koch
humor Editor................Donald Coney
Coniference Editor........H. B. Orundy
Pictoial Editor. ... . ..Robert Tarr
Music Editor....... .........H. Ailes
Assistants
M. II. Pryor John Garlinghouse
Dorothy Lennetts Isabel Fishes
Maurice Berman Winona A. Hibbard
R. A. Billington Samuel Moore
W. B. Butler T. G. McShane
Ef C. Clark W. B. Rafferty
A. B. Connable W. H.. Stonenan
Evelyn J. rCoughlin Virginia Tryon
IEugere Carmichael 1P. M. Wagner
Bernadette Cote -A. A. Webbink
Wallace I. Elliott Franklin Dickman
T. T:. iske Joseph Epstein
Ala> well Feal J. XV. Ruwitch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising........... John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising......... .Edward . Conlin
Advertising ..............Walter K., Scherer
Accounts ...............Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation...............David J. IN. Park
Publication............. . Beaumont Parks
Assistants

to discourage, rather than encourage,
men who wont to do what they can
as cheerleaders.
A CHANCE FOR FRESHMEN
The class of 1926 is showing a
marked apathy towards enrollment in
the Reserve Officers' Training Corps.
Barely enough men have enlisted to
replace those who graduated last
year, and as the growth of the R. 0.
T. C. is determined largely by the
number of freshmen who enter, it be-
hooves first year men to take cog-
nizance of the special advantages
which mebership in the corps af-
fords-
Any frshman who enrolls now will
have a chance to complete the course
and secure his commission without
extra work. If he waits until his
sophomore or junior year he will not
have this opportunity Because of the
fact that University credit is given
for military work, a man can fit him-
self for a position in the R. O. T. C.,
where he can be of the maximum
service during time of war without
any more labor on his part than the
securing of a similar amount of cred-
it in other scholastic pursuits would
entail.
As 75,000 college men throughout
the country are now taking this
training, the progressiveness and pa-
triotism of an institution might well
be judged by its enrollment in the
R. O. T. C. The corps at Michigan
is handicapped because the class of
1926, through procrastination or some
other cause, has failed to take ad-
vantage of the unusual opportunities
offered. What is the matter with our
freshmen?
THE ALL-SPORTS QUESTION
One of the things the proposed
Conference All-Sports; championship
would help to bring about would be
a greater interest in minor, and a
corresponding lessening of the em-
phasis on major sports. These things
would naturally follow from a point
system .which would grade a schdol
partially for its success in athletics,
and partially for theextensiveness of
its athletil system It would accom-
plish this by granting credit points
according to the success of the par-
ticipants in each sport and by grant-
ing points also merely for entering
an9 recognized form of competition.
This would mean that each school
would attempt to make a showing in
practically every branch of sport,
which implies that some of the in-
terest now concentrated on major
sports would be naturallf diffused
over a wider field, including minor
sports.
The very fact that major sports are
so immensely popular has subjected
them to attack from prominent edu-
catars by the score. These may have
some justification.
At any rate, the public interest in
football, baseball, and basketball has
meant the practical eclipsing of inter-
est in swimming, wrestling, or soc-
cer. But minor sports open a field
of en leavor to a number of men who
are not fitted for major sports. Their
encouragement means a closer reali-
zaton of the "Athletics for all" ideal.
All'of which is by way of asking
again, "Why not .have a Conference
All-Sports Championship?" Can there
be any answer?
THE PRESS CLUB
The University Press club, which is
holding its first regular meeting to-
night should be warmly supported by
students and prospective followers of
journalism for one reason especially.
The success of the Press club, which

was organized last year, means that
students can have the opportunity of
meeting the men who have become
leaders in the newspaper world. These
men come to the club meetings and
tell their experiences and ideas in-
formally to the members
They should furnish the best pos-
sible answer to students who are
asking themselves: What sort of men
would I find in the newspaper pro-
fession? Do my ideas run along the
same channels as theirs? Would I
be happy in their field of work? Hun-
dreds of students have asked them-
selves these question The Press club
will provide the anwer for many

0ASRD RQLL
AND COFFE E
IF AT FIRST YOU DON'T
SUCCEED-
In botany I study hard,
And learn astounding things;
The age of trees I now can tell,
By counting all their rings.
Now in my house there is a room
Which has a bath-tub old;
Now if I count its many rings,
Will its right age be told?
LONG BOY.
"BLAST YOUR EYES!" f
Every time Jupiter Pluvius starts
to "pluve", the silken rain-shades that
are brought forth to protect the fair
and blooming heads of, the gentle co-
eds rival the flowers that bloom in the
spring, tra la! But the fairest flow-
er that blooms in State Street's garden
is one we saw last Saturday. Verily
it rivaled Joseph's coat. It included
every schade of the rainbow spectrum,
specializing in red, green, white, blue
and yellow and the net result of one
look was a sensation of shell shock
succeeded by total lapse.
EMPTY.
WEST HALL?, MY WEST HALL
Oft in the stilly night, as they say
in hymns, we sit up thinking what
CAN be done with West Hall! Well,
here's this:
Give it to the City of Annarbor to
finish paving North State street.
By the way, the babe that really
had the big part in "Emperor Jones"
was the cuckoo who kept sloughing
the tom-tom off-stage for two hours.
.. QQ. I
OUR EMBALMED OUTLINE OF THE
WORLD'S HISTORY
II: The Flood

EDITORIAL COMMENT
RESULTS
(Tle Purdue Exponent)
After spending three years in the
university, a senior begins to wonder
what benefits he has received from
his course aside from the technical
knowledge necessary to follow his
profession. Being surrounded by con-
genial associates adds a polish and a
fineness of iianner the value of which
is inestimable, but an anlaysis of the
three years' work shows the result
that should be. most highly prized is
the character building and a training
which proceeds step by step with the
advances in the classroom.
The years spent at the university
tend to draw out the natural talents
of the student, because in the varied
curriculum offered he will find, some
subjects that have a strong appeal
and which will give him opportunity
to develop and to specialize in a par-
ticular work. In the preparatory
years the student is compelled to fol-
low the leadership of an older, ex-
perienced person, and in a small meas-
ure this is true in college, but for
the average man or woman, a uni-
versity course of four years points
the way to a specialty in which the
natural tendencies of the individual
will have the greatest field for ac-
tion and development The student
"finds" himself, gets a new estimate
of his own powers, and a stronger
degree of self-reliance.
liance.
In order to stay in the University, a
man must measure up to the stand-
ard set, and his continual struggle
to attain and aurpass this mark is a
process of character building. The
consistent accomplishment of work
well done produces confidence, sta-
bility, and shows him to be dependa-
ble. He is introduced, in a measure,
to work; and in the same manner, is
given a taste of pits rewards. The.
purpose of the University is to pre-
pare men for the battles of life, and
the nearer a man gets to the end of
his course, and to the big "Com-
menrement"_ in the world, the more
he realizes the necessity of a string-
ent course of study such as has just
passed through.

MICHIGAN

SO NG

:-:A T -

GAH MS
BOTH STlORES

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jacksgn

TIME TABLE

A better
GYMl. OUTFIT
for less money
CGor Men cs*,1Swne1&49

EXCHANGE YOUR
MISFIT PEN
FCR A
6 THg D

(Eastern Standard Time).
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
a.m., 7:oo a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:o5 a.m. and
hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 P.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m. and ev-
ery two hours to 9 :oo p.m., ii:oo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only-iz:4o p.mn., J :r5 a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m., 12:1o
P. In.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo -- Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
P.Il.

RIDESRS PEN SHOP
Students supply Store
1.11 South University Ave.
Engineers' and Architects' Materials
Stationery, Fountain Pens, Loose Leaf Books
Cameras and Supplies
Candies, Laundry Agency, Toaccos

LAST EDITION OF

BOOK

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

OCTOBER,

2
16
23
30

T
3
10
17
24
31

W
4
11
18
25

T
5
12
19
26

F
6
13
20
27

1922
S
14
21
28

Next,
through

in our triumphal
the ages, we come

end-run
to the

Townsend H. Walfe
Kenneth Seick
George Rockwood
Terry 1M. ayden
Eugene I,. Dunne
Wni. Graulich, Jr.
John C. Haskin
iar-vt~y ;. Reed
C. I,. Put namn
T. P. Armantrout
HI. W. Cooper
Wallace Flower
Edw. B. Riedle
harold L. Halek

Alfred M. White
Wm. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wm. H. Good
Clyde L. Hagerman
A. Hartwell, Jr.
J. Blumenthal
Howarde ayden
#XW. K. Kidder
Henry Freud
herbert P. Bostwick
L. Pierce

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1922
Night Editor-RALPH N. BYERS
AN UNFAIR METHOD
The position of cheerleader is one
of considerable importance, both be-
cause of the scarcity of men who are
able successfully to. handle the work
and the effect which his influence has
upon the spirit of the rooters at a
game, and in direct sequence upon
the team itself. Consideringrthese
factors, the choosing of the present
cheerleaders seems to have been car-
ried out in a, manner not quite in
keeping with the importance of the
position.
As ommittee of five men was se-
lected by the Student council to judge
the tryouts during the game last Sat-
urday. Of these men, however, two
were members of the football squad
and could hardly be expected to make
well-we ghed judgments during the
time the two teams were on the
field. This arrangement left the
choice of cheerleaders in the hands of
three students. Obviously, it is un-
fair to both judges and tryouts to
provide that the committee of so
snall a number decide upon the qual-
ifications of fifteen men leading
cheers, in the course of one contest.
ilow these judges arrived at their
decisions is a matter of conjecture,
since no scoring cards were issued to
furni sh acommon basis on which to
build conclusions. Even though some
sach system was employed, however,
it is extremely unlikely that any just
determination of the best men could
be accomplished in so short a time.
There is little doubt that the cheer-
leaders chosen for the coming year
will be satisfactory, but granting this
it will be in spite of the method of se-
lec .ion rattier than because of it.
Ohio State has realized the value of
effliient cheerleaders, and as a conse--
quence she has adopted a thorough
system for testing their merits. For-
ty timyouts are competing for places
on the Ohio State cheering squad.
These men turn out every afternoon
and practice. They are furnished

flood. After forty days of freshman
weather the flood stopped, so history
sayn. But recent excavations for
the new physics building prove that
it was really caused by a lapse of
Noah's memory during which he for-
got to turn off the water in the bath-
room.
At any rate the entire world and
Washtenaw county was completely
covered with water, leaving only the
top of West Hall protruding above the
rippling surface.
Noah awoke early in the morning
on thb Sunday following Saturday
night and seeing nothing but water,
suspected a flood. Then he got out the
family canoe and, taking the wife and
family pets (a couple of each), set
sail.
The water was too deep for him to
get into his cellar, hence the saying'
"Water, water everywhere, but not a
drop to drink." After they had gone
as far as Barton Damn they saw a
hill. So they got off and played golf
until the flood got tired and went
home.
Don't miss our next install-'-
ment! Cleopatra and Mark An-
tony will be taken care of pres-
ently.
LUKE WARM.
TO EDNA
The gorgeousness of rose-kissed
dawns,
Translated into lustrous bronze-
That is your hair.
The limpid blue of northern pools
Humanized despite all rules-
That is your eyes.
The whiteness of the glistening snow
When fallen but an hour or so-
That is your teeth.
The softness of the azure skies,
Plush curtains of God's paradise-
That is your skin.
But lovely though your features are,
More lovely still your "You" by far;
For nothing in this world whole
Can gauge the beauty of your soul.
The Frivolous Fellow.
And then he kissed her.
A BIZARRE wench
Is Kitty Huff-
She smokes and swears
And thinks she's tough.
urch.

Start Right With a Good Hatl
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When.
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)
ADRIANĀ®- ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours Front Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D
8:45 A.N.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X--Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

4 . t

ENFORCING THE RULE
(The Daily Illini)
Intead of retracting the battered
summer basebal rule, the council of
coaches in the Big Ten has determin-
ed upon a policy. of strict enforce-
ment. They came to an understand-
ing that they would make a concerted
attempt to exclude players ineligible
under the provision. For the first
time, they have pledged themselves
not to consider the coach who reports
violations as an "informer", but to
accept his evidence for the good of
the sport.
We do not believe that the summer
baseball rule should stand, we believe
that the Conference will retract it
within the next three years How-
ever, therule remains, and now that
there has been some fidelity pledged
to its enforcement, enforcement must
be the word
If the summer baseball rule is to
stay on the books, and if it is to ae-
complish what those who foster itbe-
lieve it will, it must be carried out
indiscriminately and with emphasis.
There must be a general house-
cleaning throughout the Big Ten
which will. quiet a few of the gal-
loping rumors that half the players
on some teams are ineligible. Per-
haps these reports are exaggerated.
But they are too recurring not to be
founded upon some fact. The sum-
mer baseball rule declares war on
the men who accept pay for playing
baseball during vacation.
THE- )IDNIGHT HOUR
(Columbia Spectator)
Midnight sessions are among the'
most e ijoyable e'xperiences in col-
lege life. No classroom discussion
can possibly take the place of the
friendly, rambling, soul-revealing sort
of argument that most of us carry
in our memories as the choicest part
of our undergraduate days. Count
not that time lost which is stolen
from studies and dull, profitable edu-
cation, to drag discussion through
interminable windings while the room
is filled with the atmosphere of phi-
losophy and blue tobacco smoke, and
the hands of the alarm clock, which
is to ring at 7 a. in., slowly move
around to 4 o'clock in the morning.
This is the time when friendship
is tested, when toleration and fair-
mindedness are taxed to the limit,
when Utopian schemes are advanced
to reform religion, college, college
politics, or the social system. That
is the time when generous or im-
practicable impulses have full sway,
when man meets man without his de-
ceivin mnak of manner and custom.

The O. & H. Shoe for Men

Price $9.00

THE KNICKER-An O. & H. oxford of special de-
sign. It comes in Black or .Brown and is made of the highest
quality Russia viking calfskin. Be sure to see it, we know
you'll like it.
O'Kane & Hertler
For FOOTWEAR For
Men 335 S. MAIN ST. Women
Have Your Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

Corduroy

Reefers

Tweed and. Cord Top',Coats
Cra-venettes, Gabardines

and Rain Coats

At Lowest Prices

"Torn Wye" Coats and Sweaters

Leather Jackets, Vests, Hunting Coats, etc.
O. D. Wool Army Shirts

DISCUSSION GROUPS
With the organization today of
freshmen discussion groups, sponsor-
ed by the Student Christian associa-
tion, an institution is being estab-
lished which will fill a long-felt need
of entering students.
The new student on the campus,
confronted by the problems of Uni-
versity life, is frequently at a loss as
to the proper attitude he should take,
as to just what reaction towards his
new surroundings will insure his get-
ting the most out of college life in its
preparation for his future. The plan
underlying the organization of fresh-
man discussion groups is to provide
n mria~ # n.rh <hil.r athnrc

"SAFETY FIRST" DRIVE
DECLARED SUCCESSFUL
Police Arrest Thirty-Eight for Traffic
Violations in Two
Weeks
- Our Own Daily.
No doubt our department of public
safety works on the commission basis.
A young friend of mine from Duquesne,
Had a date with a very nice jesne;
But to me introduse
He did refuse

S m Munson ,Army, Officers' Dress and Hiking
Shoes, Puttees, High-Top and Moccasin Pack
Shoes for ladies and men.

blankets and Auto Robes

C.I.Elpimill-140

Cm' 1U~ bĀ£

Cfnro

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