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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T F/YE

HOLD TRIA WORKOUT
FARlREL~L IRE WNS Pit!N MIN E
FOR i)VA Ll 3E ET WITh
NWiSCONSlN

of building his team around these l
men. There are three men who are
making a good showing and who are
running strong for a position on the,
team, Davis, Isbell and G. Rearick.
These men have been showing up as
real runners and will no doubt im-, ANN
prove in the future. l
Cross country has not in the past
I orvth, , nf n ni nrnrpoinn he

I IUD rLAf fHMII
ECND CME TO
ARBOR TEAM INCLUDES
PRAT, YIK, SHULTZ,
AN BOVEN

9QU 1) WILL START PRACTICE
TOMORROW M(IT iN
WATER)IAN G-Y.
Coach E. J. Mather has issued the
. i7t call for basketball caudidafes for
the 1922,Varsity- All men are asked
t report at 7:30 o'clock Monday night
n the Varsity locker room, Water-
nan gymnasium, at which time lock-
ers will he issued. Candidates are re-'
1uested to bring their own equipment.
Prospects for a successful quintet
tre, as the season looms in the offing,
lecidedly roseate. Two men are lost
roni last season's team, ex-Captairn
3ud" Rea and Rex Reason, but to fill
heir Places Coach Mather has an as-
(ortment of court luminaries that
hould bring joy to his heart.
feading'the list'is Captain Ely who,
n one short season, became the great-
st center in .the Big Ten. Around
his p owerful player, who should be
a tremendous strength in himself, are
rathered five more veterans, all reg-
1lars on the 1921-22 Varsity which
i ished in a tie for second honors
n the Conference race, just behind
'rdue and on an even footing with
iVisconsin. There is, for example,
";ill" Miller, undoubtedly one of the
ending forwards in the middle West
ast year. Miller will be back at his
:1d post again this season, and if his
ibility to cage the ball from uncanny
ngles is again to the fore he should
.r unequtaled.
Agau there is Harry Kipke of foot-!
>all: fame, who made almost as great
i name for himeslf in the court
ane, playing at forward.y HLtre-
mendous speed and shifty style of
olay combine to make him thorough-i
y dangerous to all opposition and a
rnan who is almost certain of a berth
m the five during the coming sea-

creaCLeU ai,,tlL'L VL t L .,zJxlllfl A-L'-'J. ,

.

Coach Steve Farrell put his cross as it always has in other colleges.
country squad tl rough a tryout runThis is shown. by the fact that only a
atry0 30 'clock hter cay mrourng comparatively few turn out for the
at 10:30 o'clock yesterday morning 'sport. With the recent change in the
in spite of the adverse weather. how- requirement of obtaining an "M" in
ever. the roads were in such bad con- this sport it is hoped that more menI
dition that the tryout only material- will turn out. At present there areF
ized into a workout with no times only 40 out.
taken. j . Every indication is that Steve will
Wisconsin confirmed Oct. 21 for a produce a winning team from the ma-
meet with Michigan's., squad, and terial that he has on hand if none of
Steve is planning to take six or pos- them become ineligible.
sibly seven men to Madison. On
two weeks from yesterday trials will-
held to determine what men will coin-
pose the team. In the meantime Steve _BASKEBALL. NOICE
intends to put his squad through As
stiff training in view of having his Vsyb All candidates for this year's
men in the best of condition for this ( Varsity basketball team are ask-
first important meet. ed to report at 7 :30 o'clock Mon-
Great interest is being aroused over day evening in the Varsity lock-
this meet as it is the first time that er room, Waterman gymnasium.
Michigan has competed with Wiscon- timcer Candidates bring thir
sin since the Wolverines reentered the owtie aideth
Conference. Wisconsin has ateam own equipment
that is well able to give Michigan's E. J Mather, Coach-
squad a run for its monjey._-_ _
Paptain Bowen and Arndt are the
only members of last year's squad Lose something? A classified in

When the baseball team represent-
ing the ZAI-Gaz Grotto in the City
league -meets the Ray Battery team
of Ypsilanti at three o'clock this af-
ternoon at West Park, in the second
game of the series for the champion.-
ship of Washtenaw county, it will,
have in its lineup several names fa-
miliar to Conference athletics. Dick
Schultz, who startled the south last
spring with his pitching, will perform
on the mound for the Grottos while
his old battery mate, Ernie Vick, cap-
tain of the 192 Varsity team, will do
the receiving- 'Pete Van Boven, for-
mer Varsity captain, will take care of
third base. Jack Dunn, former foot-
ball star, and Len Van Boven will be
seen in the outfield.
Besides this galaxy of former Mich-
igan athletes, the Grottos will be fur-
ther strengthened by the presence of
fDel Pratt, just arrived from a success-
ful season at 2nd base with the Boston
Americans, who will play the keystone

follows: Schulz, pitch; 'Vick, catch;
Hutchinson, first. base; Pratt, second
base; P. Van Boven, third base; M.
Royce, shortstop; L. Van Boven,
Gould, Dunn, and Royce, outfield.
Though not known definitely, it is
expected that Rynearson, former Yp-
silanti Normal star, will do the twirl-
ing for the Rays. He also will be sup-
ported by a team composed of ama-
teur and professional stars.
The Rays took the first gamsof the
series 7-2 but the Grottos are de-
termined to land the remainder of the
series.
GRANT FERRY FIELI)
CONCESSION B I D S
Award of refreshment concession
goods on Ferry field was made Fri-
day by. the Athletic association to
Harry J. Walker, '23, and John W.
Kellog, '24D.
These men were given the conces-
sion after consideration by the asso-
ciation of bids, which closed Friday.
This right to have thec responsibility
of all refreshments sold on the field
means that the men will either han-
dle all sales themselves or by men
directly under them.

back. Steve now has the problem

the Daily will find it.-Adv.

Heinie Groh, the veterAn, tu left, and Joe Dugan, the "kid.'
In one short season Joe Dugan, young infielder, was hurled from the
darker confines of the baseball cellar to the limelight on a pennant win-
ning baseball club. Now he is pitted against one of the best thiid base-
men in the game in the classic of the diamond, leinie Groh, grizzled vet,
has long ranked as one of the most brilliant third basemen from all angles
in the game. Many still rate him as the best. Fans will watch the work
of these two-the vet and the "Ki "-in the present scries with interest.

. k.
L

n

ARMY WINS OVER
KANSAS BY 134

son.
One must go faf to find a better
$ uard than Franklin Cappon, like-
vise star of Coach Yost's eleven. The
H olland boy was a demon on defense
ast year and, not content with that,
Uid more than his share of basket
ossing. (appon will find an excel-
ent running mate in Birks, who made
much a hit at protective position last
o 'ear. Dirks is a splendidly steady
,layer who can always be depended
n.lHe spilled many an enemy at-
enipt at field goals last year and bids
air to upset even more in the near
Those six men alone, Captain Ely,
Cipke, Miller, Cappon, Paper and
3irks would make up a team of
vhich any university could well be
roud, but coming to Coach 'Mather
his year will be whole gobs of ma-
erial from the 1921 freshman squad.
While it is impossible at this time to!
tate who can 'be most seriously con-
idered from the former yearlings
here are a number of men who show-k
d to good advantage and who my be
nentioned as possible candidate for
egular berths. For forward there
re such men as Haggerty, Buchema,
4iggins, Moody, Gruske, Gowan, War-
ley, and Webb. Center may show
trong candidates in McFalan, Em-
ry, Roberts, and fadley, while last
7ear's strongest guards were Steg-
,neieh, Kresbach, Slaughter, Martin,
Dunne, Cole, and Hinds. '
All this, of course, does not take in-
o consideration possible dark horses
,hat may appear at the eleventh hour
to claim their share of honors. Cer-
tain it seems that Michigan's basket-
5a lpppects are brighter than they
have been for many years.
Alunni Vote on Trustees
The older alumni in all cases lead
he percentage column in the num-
ber of ballots, although the natural
presumption would be that men re-
cently graduated would show the
most interest in such things. The
class of '84 led the column with other
- classes of the nineteenth century close
behind while the highest aggregation,
of any class since 1900 was that of
1921 and they had to be content with
thirty fifth place.
Another thing of note was that New
York, which would naturally be as-
sumed to be the leader in the per
centage column stood In eighteenyh
place.

West Point, Oct. 7.-Army <lefeattd
Univ. of Kansas 13 to 0. The contest
was witnessed by a large crowd i'
spectators, 500 Kansas. rooters being
in the stands to cheer their eleven.
The game was played in a drizzling
rain. Both teams had trouble in handl-
ing the ball, passing and kicking fea-
turing the play. Army's first touchy
down came as a result of a success-
fully completed wIss. It was in t.
first -period when the -cad-ets had thE-,
ball on Kansas' 30 yard line. Atpass
Sny the to White, -took it to the
mark from which Wood took it over
on a line plunge.
Clarke intercepted a forward pass
in the second neriod and ran 55 yard-
to a score. The goal was missed anti
the Kansans held the army safe
throughout tho last two periods but
never seriously threatened to score.

CHICAGO EASILY
DEFEATS GEORGIA
Chicago, Oct. 7.-Displaying polish-
ed team work and relying almost en-
tirely on straight football, the Uni-
versity of Chicago machine rolled up
a 20 to 0 score on the University oV
Georgia in the first game of Chica-
e's season today.
A crowd of 18,000 witnessed the
,ame played on a rain soaked field.
Hali back Johnny Thomas and Jimmy
i'yott, together with full back Zor-
an carriedthe 1all out of 10 times
and ripped big holes in the Georgia
'defense on almost every attempt.
Georgia fought a plucky fight stop-
ping Chicago ior downs three times
within the five yafd line. Stagg's
favorite last year, a line drive in
which the whole backfield drives
through to clear the way for the
runner was used time after time with
great success.

1A Y
Complete Gym. Suit,
including Shoes

Phone

I d

13

tUNLIJCi y.
FOR~ SPOTS

aveit ,Masters Cleaned
it costs You No More

0

W~e Call anid De iVer

X52.sof

WE HAVE EVERYTHING YOU
NEED FOR THE GYM.

_ DY ER5 pRE5 R5
LLPI

8ip
O _p.. "_' .y

Scores Twice hi
Game Yesterday FOR

PENS AND GOOD REPAIRING

m0F So. Slate St.

711 NORTH UNIVERSITY AVENUE
(NEXT TO ARCADE THEATRE)
The Only Exclusive Athletic Goods
Store in,he City

iTES TIS
CLOSES COE
A3 P.M. A DVER'I ISING AT 3 K..
MICHIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per woied a day, paid in advance. Min-
iinum charge for first day, 25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. , Three
cents per word .per day if charged., White space charged for at rate
of 5c per agate line. Classified, charged only to those having phones.
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advance.
PRONE 960

i

MARY
GREENWOOD

RED
KILGORE

On ONAY ONLY

White halo Shirts

% $2-00*

All sizes and sleeve lengths

Harry JKpkI
Kip was one of the sensations of
the game against Case when he made
two long broken field runs which end-
ed in touchdowns.

ON THE SECOND FLOOR AT 324 SO. STATE STREET,

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Solo B flat cornet and
violin; also good sanitary cot with
pad, and gas range. All in good
condition. Call, after five' o'clock,
at 617 E. Liberty, apt. 2. 13-1
FOR SALE-Airedale puppies with
the combined blood-lines of two of
the world's greatest dogs. 711
Fountain St. 12-3
FOR SALE-RADIO SET. Wound
specially for Detroit broadcasting.
Neatly encased. Phone 1937-M.
11-3
FOR SALE-A chafing dish, practic-
ally new. Call at 603 Ann st.
Phone 1482-M. 11,2
FOR SALE-Restaurant. Going con-
cern. $1100 starts you right. Phone
1798-W. 11-3
FOR SALE-Ford Speedster. Good
Tires. Fine Shape. $95.00. Daniels
1808-M. -_12-2
FOR SALE-A sequin formal dress.
New, size 36. Half price. Call 1209-M
after 6. 11-3
FOR SALE-Sweet Cider. Bring your
jug. Chas. Klager, ,617 S. Main St.
10-25
FOR SALE-Rudd Automatic Heater.
$50.00. Phone Booth 2666. 6-21
WANTED
WANTED-Young healthy men
weighing about 150 lbs. at Univer-
Ssity Hospital for blood doners. See
Dr. Morrill. 11-3
WANTED- Room-mate. Wonderful
suite across from Engineering Arch,
1103 So. University. 12-2
WANTED-Pair men's riding boots.
Address R. T. H. Daily. 12-2
WANTED-Students washing. Phone
2873-M. 12-2
FOR RENT-Piano. Apply Foster's
House of Art. 12-2
FOUND

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-ANY STUDENT NOT
YET PERMANENTLY LOCATED,
WHO IS INTERESTED IN A REA-
SONABLY PRICED SINGLE ROOM
TWO BLOCKS FROM THE CAM-
PUS MAY CALL 1780-R AND ASK
FOR MR. RICE. .12-2
FOR RENT-Exceptionally large east
room for two or throe men. Could
arrange adjoining room for sleep-
ing. Party may'do Qwr roam work
and reduce rent it desired. Phone
1194-M. 422 E. Washington. 11-3
FOR RENT-Single room. Reason-
able quiet home. One other room-
er. Fuel on hand to heat. 811 Pack-
ard. 13-1
FOR RENT-Double room on main
floor near campus. Maried couplo
preferred. 2121-W. 314 William St.
13-1.
FOR REINT-Desirable room or suite
to desirable roomer. 928' Oakland.
LOST
LOST-Gruen gold wrist watch. Be-
tween Saunders Canoe Livery and
Oakland Ave. Finder please return
to Alice Perkins, 801 Monroe. Phone
1602-R. Reward. 13-t
LOST-Gold fountain pen. Pocket
book containing four theater tick-
ets for Oct. 5. Reward. Call E. Orn-
duff 1325. 12-2
LOST-1925 Web and Flange Pin. Call
Howell-5M. 13-2
MISCELLANEO1S

SPECIAL HICHIGAN-OHIO ATTRACTION

HARTMAN
THEATRE
COLUMBUS

Fri.-Sat., Oct. 20-21

ACY.
p i 0

PYk lEX

41tI 0
'E

2

Perf ormnces
Mich.-Ohid Might
SATURD~AY

7 and11 P l 0

JOS s GATES' ORIGINAL PRODUGIION
THIE BIGGEST EXTRAVAGANZA EVER ON TOUR IN THE
UNITED STATES
THE THEATRE MANAGEIENT GVIRANTEN THIS AT-
TRACTION to be not only one of the most iiieriorns but
by far THE MOST PORTENTiOUS that has ever beeni bookwd
in ihis section. It promises to be a treat that comes oily
once in a decade. TillSIS POSITIVELY the New York,
Chicago, Number One and ONLY company presenting this
succcessfjl imusical spectacle.

THE ORIGINAL TRANSPARENT OVENWARE
No woman can have too much Pyrex. Like accumulating
silver service, she often buys it piece by piece until she has

a
a

new complete Pyrex equipment - Casseroles - pie plates --
pudding dishes, ramekins, Custard Cups, bean pots, and so on.

u C FSH: con

4 4ub .rr r.
n ::

[FURNTTUIRE-Doiubie

study

rU~JY

chiffonier, sanitary cot and mat-
tress, single. white iron bed and
mattress, three straight chairs, hall
matting, clothes bars, winged chair,
reed rocker, gate legged table, bea-
ding chest, white enamejed single

Up-to-the-Minute Hardware
FOND-Alcintpurenwithmoney

FOUND-A. coin -iurs6 with monoy,

f :'.

a

Rx~mcn2swtb 1151

F

1!

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