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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 08, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MI

IHIGI

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
ring the University year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications.
Memober of Western Conference Editorial
sociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
led to the use for republication. of all
ws dispatchescredited to itornaot ther-
se credited in this paper and the local
'we published therein.
En'ere 1 at the postofficenat-Ann Arbor,
chigan, as second class hatter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
rd Street.
Phones:.Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
Communications not to exceed 300 words
signed, the signature not necessarily to
.pear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
d notices of events will be published in
e Dailysat the discretion of the Editor, if
ft at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
ined communications will receive no con-
leration. No manuscript will be returned
less the writer encloses postage. The Daily
es not necessarily endorse tiae sentiments'
pressed in the communications.
E.IITOIAL STAFFg
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
ity Editor. ......James B. Young
ssistant City iditor ..........Marion Kerr
ditorial Board Chairman......E. R. Meiss
ight Editors--l
Ralph Byers Iarry Hoey
~J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L. T. llershdor er R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donpau
ports Editor. ......... H.. McPice!
unday Magazine ECditor.......Delbert lark
domea' dI tor .............. Marion Koch.
umor Editor ....... .Donald Concy
nference 3ditor..........H."B. Grundy
ictorial Editor.........Robert Tarr
usic Editor ............ . H. Ailes
Assistants
d. II. Prye'r VJ~bn (a'r~nlihvse
)oroth y Ienetts Isabel Fisher
laurice BeIman Winona A. Hibbard
2. A, Killington Samuel Moore
. B. Butler '1'. G. McShane
C, Clark W. B. Rafferty
B. Conuable W. H. Stoneman
:velyn J. Coughlin Virginia Tryon
ugene Carmichael P. M. Wagner
ernadette Cote A. P. Webbink
Vallace F. Elliott Franklin Dickman
. E. Fiske Joseph Epstein
lax well FeadT J. W. Ruwitch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960l
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT 1. PARKER
dvertising ..... .....John J. Hamel, Jr.
,dvcrtising...............Edward F. Conlin
dvcrtisig .. ........Walter K. Scherer
ecounts....... ..aurence II. Favyot
irculation...David J. M. Park
ublication. .. L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

cation between nations has drawn'
Americainto such contact with the
rest of the 'world that she can never
hope to sink back againi into the
realmcoftisolation.rThe people of
this country, therefore, must main-
tain their interest in international
affairs. Sir Robert Borden, while in
Ann Arbor, stated his belief that the
future peace of the world rests upon
public opinion. If the opinion of the
individual is to be of international
influence, then he must acquaint him-
self with the relations of the world
in order that he may exert that in-
fluence wisely.
Americans must awaken to this fact
sooner or later. They must learn to
know other nations and study their
institutions. The same statesman
mentioned above, speaking in behalf
of Canada, said, "We know your gov-
ernment, but I don't think you know '
ours." If the United Sates is to ex-I
ert that sane judgment in interna-
tional. politics of which uhe is capa-
ble, it will only be when the people
of this nation achieve a firmer back-
ground for their beliefs before tak-
ing a definite and often dangerous
stand in regard to international
events.

T ASTED ROLL
IWET; WITHj
SHOWERS
TODAY'S FASHION NOTE

EDITORIAL COMMENT

LAST EDITION OF

4 '
J
^~
71 ~ )

At the left is shown
one of the most recent
models now being worn+
on the leading football
fields or- the United
States. It is pre-emi-
nently en regle for
the days when Jupiter
Pluvius really out-dis-
tances himself. Rum-
or has it that Yost and

COLLEGE ATMOSPHERE
(Ohio State Lanten)
What is college atmosphere?
This evening a jazz orchestra isl
practicing across the street; next
door an orchestra is playing popular
music; beyond that a cornetist is try-
ing to play; on the first floor two men
are singing, preparatory to trying out
for the Glee club; and on the corner
a phonograph is noisily sending out
its strains.
A restaurant is filled to capacity
with a crowd. which cheerfully chat-
ters continuously, the shrill voices
and laughter of the women rising
above the deeper undertones of the,

MICHIGAN

:-: A T i::

SONG

B OOK

BOTH STORES '

t

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson

WOLI SRE

4

Yost have made arrangements to
costume their entire cast. in this
charming and bizarre model to fa-
cilitate the Submarine Attack. Posed
by Annabel Lee.
IN THE LIBRARY STUDY-HALL
A shaft of sunlight falls athwart the
leaves,
Warm with the touch of grain in
golden sheaves,
Piled in far meadows through the
slumberous day:
And I sit reading you,
Monsieur Dauidet!

TIME TABLE

W1{AR PORTRAITS-
Under the auspices of the Ann Ar-
bor Art association, there has been
placed on exhibition in the Alumni
Memorial Hall the famouA collection
of "War Portraits". Among these
pictures is the well known "Signing
of the Peace Treaty, 1918". Portraits
of distinguished American and for-
eign leaders in the late world crisis
are included in the display.
Michigan has been particularly
fortunate in her art attractions. But
pe.rhaps because of this very good
fortune, her students are often like
children in a toy shop; they see so
much on every side that is interest-
ing, that they do not know just what
to choose, and the tendency is to let
them all go for a picture show. The
present art exhibit, however, is one
not only of cultural value, but also.
of initeiise interest because, of the
live, moderntsubject whichit treats.
It was only as the result of stren-
uous ffort and considerable expense
that the Art association was able to
obtain the portraitt now.on display,
and to help defray the latter an ad-
mission fee of twenty-five cents is be-
ing charged. A movie or a midnight
lunch cost more, and yet the satis-
faction is certainly more transitory
and less cultural.

Monsieur Daudet,1
-If you were here,{
Watching the white, carved dancersf
on the wall,
(The wind that loiters through the
windows tall
Flickers their careless draperies, I1
swear!)
Would you read on about Jean-
nottiere,
Monsieur Daudet?
The printed words are dimmied before
my eyes;
I see, instead, the blue of autumn:
skies,
A young cloud peeping o'er a Maple
tree -
And I forget your tale in ec-
Stacy !
So you would, eh?
Monsieur Daudet?
NUFF-SED.
IT MIGHT interest you to know that
at Pittsburg Tech they are contem-
plating the adoption of Scotch kiltie
uniforms for their band. (He rolls
his own.)
Perhaps we could stretch the re-
gents' appropriation to kilts'

men.
The campus is covered with stu-
dents hurrying to classes, cheerily
hailing each other, exchanging words
of grceting and good wishes for the
year.
In the quiet of a classroom a group
earnestly talkes notes on a lecture be-
ing given by an instructor.
Which of these represents the col-
lege atmosphere? None. It is a mix-
ture of all these, and more. There is,
a spirit of good-fellowship, of mutual
helpfulness, of true devotion to the
school and to education among the
the easy-going but hard-working men
and -women that makes up the atinos-
phere of college.
Underneath the covering of jazz,
wholesale kidding, and noisy familiar-
ity there is a deeper current of ef-
fort directed toward obtaining some-
thing worth while. From classes, par-
ticipation in campus activities and
athletics the student is deriving ben-
efit.
And so it all goes to make the col-
lege atmosphere, which is an elusive

(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:or
a m., 7:oo a.m., 8:oo a.m., 9:os a.m. and
htorly to 9:05 P.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arhor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound--:op a.m. and ev-
ery two hours to 9 :oo p.m., i i:oo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only-i1r:40 p.m., i:1s a.m.
'To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a.m., 12:10
I). mn.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo -Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
p.m.

by p lay.

i

Reports by Radio

Are you getting them?
If yOu can't go to the O.S. U. game
you can get the reports by radio play

1922
s
1
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30

OCTOBER
T W T
3~ 4 5
10 11 12
17 1g 19
24 25 26
31

F
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1922
S
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thing never met with elsewhere. Out-
side of an American university it can-
not be found, -rd what it is only a'
col'ege man can know. It is a pot-
pourri of good-fellowship, work and
play, and study'. A sealed book to all
who have not experienced it as stu-
dents, it is an intangible something
that will alway remain an unknown
quantity to the outsider.

Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
valuesaand quote prices which cannot,
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R.. Stops at State Street)
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X D S
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45,P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M

Why not fix you up a receiving out-
fit in time for the football g-ames? We
have just the parts you need.
We also have some high grade re-
ceiving outfits, complete.
The K aid KR adlo Su Ly Co

I

Al
d,

Over the Arcade Theatre
711 N. UNIVERSITY

PHONE 793-R

ii 'N

>wusend H. Wolfe
nneth Seick
orge Rockwood
rry M. Haydeni
gene L. Dunne
m. Graulich. Jr.
An C. Llaskin'
arvey E. Reed
L. Putnamr
D. Armantrout
W. Cooper,
alace Flowc
1w. B. Riedlc
arold 1T. [late

Alfred M. White
Wm. D. Roesser
-Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
WmI. I. Good
Clyde L. Hagerman
A. Hartwell, Jr.,
3. Blumenthal
H-oward, Hayden
W. K. Kidder
I-enry Freud
Herhert P. Bostwicky
1,. Pierce

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1922
light Editor-JULIAN ELLIS MACK'
AMERICA MIXIN6 IN
The effect on this country of the'
resent turmoil in Europe very graph-
tally illustrates a national attitude
f mind that has unconsciously been
alken on by the American people}
ince this country's entry into the
Yorld War in 1917.
Previous to that time America hadr
naintained a "splendid isolation"
rom world politics, an isolation dou
ly splendiat because it was not the
esult of any political machination or
et theory but was the outcome of
he natural growth of a great people
n a great continent. America be-
ame self-occupied not from a sense
f national superiority but from ne-
essity.

HOME TO CAPITOL
For the first time a woman, Mrs.
W. H. Felton of Georgia, has entered
the prodigious and sedate portals ofl
our national senate. To be sure the
appointment is merely honorary, as
her term will expire insNovember,
but the male of the species may well
conjecture what such an intrusion
may mean to the politics of the fu-
ture.
A few years back the avera* man
w/as firm in his belief that politics
would be the one profession barredl
to women, at least, as far as actual
participation was concerned. He
would give his wife and the suffrag-
ette' theballot, if necessary, but a
woman runing for office was beyond
his wildest dreams. But now this il-
lusion has been exploded by women
congressm-n, women judges, and, fin-
ally, a female senator.
In the near, future we may expect
a woman to be nominated for the Su-
preme court bench, and then, as the
apex of her achievement, run for
Ann Arbor, stated his belitf that the
president. Meanwhile, it is rumored
that the males are massing for a
counter attack by which they hope at
least to gain control over the home.

OVER THE head of the advertise-!
ment one of our prominent churches
carries in Our Own Daily there ap-
pears from time to time this instruc-
tive and illuminating remark "RE-
LIGION IS ONE; RELIGIONS ARE
MANY."
How true.
TERRIBLE JOKES
"What do those letters stand for?"
"Because they can't sit down."
Gallows-Meat
The vacuum who tells you that New
York won today.
The what-the-men-are-wearing who
favors blonde tweed.

"BEAR STORIES"
(Ohio State Lantern)
Just why, as soon as practice for
the football season opeps, coaches
'start sending out gloomy stories of
their teams and of their chances of!
having -goo nteams, is a thing not
easily explained.
It is diametrically opposite the plan
followed by the managers of major-
league baseball teams, who, as regu-
larly a> the season opens, send out
statements of how they expect to win
the pennant.
Neither of these extremes deceives
the public. The coach forgets that
during the summer every student has
been out verbally boosting his eleven,
whether or not it has an outside
chance to win an important game. All
the lugubrious tales that the publicity
man in the athletic department can
send out are counterbalanced by the
rosy accounts already given out by
the overenthusiastic undergraduate
rallying to the support of his Alma
Mater.
Now we are hearing stories of dis-
aster from Michigan. We hear daily
that some- member of the squad has
been injured or otherwise lost to the
team. And the other BIg Ten schools
are following in the wake of the Wol-
verines with their "bear stories." If it
continues, it would not be surprising
to hear that the cheer leaders and
band members in all 10 universities
had been declared ineligible or had
died from melancholia brought on by
the prospects of an unsuccessful sea-
son on the gridiron.
All followers of the American col-
lege sport discount the stories, for
they know that back of the source is
a wise coach, who is quietly whipping
a team into shape which will be
ready for the fray when the whistle
blows for the big game on the sched-
ule.

FOR PENS AND GOOD REPAIRING
RIDER
THE PEN SPECIALIST
308 So. State St.
MILLER'S BARBER SHOP
WM. A. MILLER, Prop.
Three. First Class Barbels

iiAF L

II

ii

buysthis R
Corona is the original portable typewriter with the
exclusive patended folding feature-the most convenient
typewriter in the world.

'ii

I

Knode At Quarter
Cappon At Full
- Our Own Daily.
thought they were stars. But
or stars-may they never

We
moon
wane!

2.
3.

Writes in sight.
Weighs but 61/, lbs.
Folds to only 34 in-
ches high.
Fold it up - hake it will;

4. Withstands the knacks
and bumps of travel.
5. Is dependable-rarely
need adjustment.
you - typewrite anywhere

Until the first few years of the
twentieth century the .ankee was
busy in fighting his own battles here
at home. A huge, wild continent had
to be conquered; the forces of nature
in the waste howling wilderness of
the great West had to be harnessed,
railroads had to be laid, canals built,
territories surveyed, factories reared,
forests leveled; and the thousand and
one things that knew country has to
perform kept this nation for the first
two centuies of its existence busy by,
night and by day working out its own
salvation.
When for instance the European
countries in thef latter part of the
past century were squabbling and
snarling over the dividing up of vast
deserts in Africa, America had a des-
ert of her own to explore and occupy.
The territory that now constitutes the
state of Nevada was a veritable Saha-
ra for tne genius of American Inge-
niuty to cope with.
But in the present century the Unit-
ed States has attained a 'relatively
large degree of development and the
pressure of home building having
been somewhat released she has time
to look around a bit and see how
other nations are progressing.
During the period of the World War
this nation got into the habit of think-
ing about foreign affairs. Daily re-'

GYM
In a few days compulsory gymna-
sium work for all freshman classes
will begin. It can safely be presum-
ed that this year's freshman class
will be like all others of the past.
Some of their number will consist-
ently protest the necessity of going
to these classes. Many of them will
bolt them when feasible, presenting
any sort of excuse which will "get
them by."
These freshmen will not have to
wait until they are old men to see the
folly of such an attitude. When they
have reached their senior year they
will probably begin to reflect. Possi-
bly they have attended classes when
it was compulsory, and neglected go-
ing to the gym in their upperclass-
man years. Then they will contrast
the superior physical condition that
was noticeable when they went to the
gym regularly.
The University is making an at-
tempt to teach these men that exer-
cise is an imperative need. Sooner or
later this fact becomes clear to every-
one. If it is learned during the fresh-
man year. both the freshmen and
those directing the gym work will
be happier.
News comes from across the deep
that, Germany is preparing to elect al

SAND. . .,.
And the other day
when we were sitting quietly
in one of our lectures
and doing nothing
absolutely nothing
one of the persons
whom we thought was a friend
came along and saw us in the
window of this lecture room
and what does he do but shout
our
name at us loud and clear
and everybody in
the lecture room
that knew us
turned around and guffawed
and the instructor stopped
lecturing
and we got red
someday we shall strangle
that guy
and all his
offspring.

1114 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

11

..........

"You knew me three
years at the Union."

O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

i

This One Is Very Dumb
"COULD YOU please tell me where'
is 101 M. H?" queried I of my land-,
lady, just for a joke.
"I don't know; but you might look
it up in the telephone book," she re-
plied as she slipp3ed and fell on her
best carpet ,and something else.
"Neither do I," I replied, as an
amused smile lit up my well-mould-
ed features.
Yesterday the hook we have peo-
ple hang copy on got all bent to
thunder.

ON WITH THE DANCE E
(Wisconsin Daily Cardinal)
The fraternity and sorority action
on dance music prices has been suc-
cesjful. MadlEon,'s music magnate
has yielded to their demands, or at
least, to the first two.
Fifty dollars is to be the top price
for dance orchestras. The personal
list of orchestras will be submitted
to the students so that orchestral ag-
gregations may be standardized.
The third demands of the students
that orchestras be reserved for stu-
dent use at ?0 day notices, has been
dropped. That was right.
It is right and just that students
should fix a maximum price for the
orchestras which they employ. It is
right that they should know whom
they are employing when they con-
tract for an orchestra.

ItI

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New Gown

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