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April 22, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICI UGAN DAYY

, ... ,;

.....

[AL AEWS'PAPER OF THE
ERSVLY OF MICHIGAN
d every morning except Monday
University year by the Board in
Student Publications

the ones who were selected. They,
too, are worthy, and yet were outdis-
tanced in fair and worthwhile con
petition. These men must carry on,
for it is only through their aid thn;
the new managing editors and busi-
ness managers can hope for success.
To the men who have gained appoint-
ments go the very best wishes of the
campus for a year of prosperity and
achievement.

r----------/ma
OASTED LL
:* MASEBALL!
The Annouilccnient
The management feels that at this(
most auspicious moment an announce-
ment of great import should be made
and hence it is in the making. And ifI

i

..

I EDITORIAL COMMENT

1

I

POSTER SNATCHING
(M. I. T. Tech)

of

va vc.u+,ca,.say

of Western Conference Editorial

The Associated Press is exclusively en-
itled to the use for republication of all news
lispatches q-edited to it or not otherwise
redited, inthis paper' and the local news pub-
shed therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
iardl Street. C.
Phones:etditorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
less, 960.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
signed, the sinature not ecessarily to
ppear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
ad nlotices of events will be published in
'he Daily at Pie discretion of the Tditor. if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
igned commnnications will receive no con-
ideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
loes not necessarily endorse the sentiments
xpressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STA'F
Telephones 2114 and 176-.
MANAGiNG EDITOR,
MARION B. STAHL
News Vditor...................Paul Watzel
City Editor .............James B. Young
Assistant City Editor.J. A. Bacon
FRditorial Board Chairman......E. R. Meiss

OPPOSITE EXTREMES

Most freshmen enter the portals of
University hall on registration dayI
with "general education" as their in-
centive; the key to their advancing
period of college education (if such
they make it). Knowing a little of ev-
erything and not much of anything,1
too many seniors dismount their high
horse on the platform of Hill auditor-
ium, sheepskin in hand, and take their i
place among the multitude of other
generalities who are struggling for
existence.
A broad, general education, long ac-
cepted as the worthy successor to nar-
row and classical learning, not infre-
quently degenerates into a state ofj
questionable value when such great
numbers of graduates lack any sort of
definite training or information. AA'
was stated previously in these col-1
umus Princeton university has seen
the impending trouble which lies in
the way of the continued success ot
the system now prevalent throughoutr
the United States, instituting a plan4
which calls for greater speeialNkation#
in some one field of study than was
previously required. Breadth, just as
anything else has its limits and it
should be the aim of every institution
of learning in the country to see that
no curriculum oversteps these bounds,
lest the men and women in our pres-
ent universities be as narrow in their
broadness as were the biased sdholars
of th middle ages.

everybody will give us their kind in-
dulgence for one minute--Cecil, cease
playing* that jewsharp immediately or
I will report you-I will take great
pleasure in informing you all-Kiki.-
will you stop kicling that bucket-
that Tomorrow is a foxtrot.
.* * *
It's nicer that warmer days are here.
The world has changed conipletely.
For co-eds to us so dear
Are dressing much more neatly.
Gumshoe Gus.
Gus, allow me to congratulate you
on what might be called, but most em-
phatically isn't going to be, a perfect
bit of poetry.
* * *
' Echoes from a Boiler
What makes me stay at home from
. school? .
What makes the devil's spirits rule?
What makes my Temper like a mule?

An Ame'rican characteristic which
has not endeared us to our European.
cousins is the habit of souvenir
snatching. Money often obtains a wel-
come for Yankee tourists, but the
agony of the natives who see their
shrines profaned is too familiar to
bear repeating.
The spirit behind this desire to
carry away a splinter from the castle's
great hail shows itself in the corri-
dors of Technology. Stealing posters
from the bulletin board§ has become
so common that this means of giving
information may become extinct.
Posters which require hours of hard
work decorate some student's room
when the should be on the boards.
An ambition to have surroundigs
which recall the pleasant past is not.
evil. It is the means and not the end
to which publicity men object. After
their few days in the public eye poet-
ers will be given away. Surely the
desire for wall decoration is not so
strong that it cannot be held in check
long enough to make the drawing at
gift and not booty.

D uncan & Starling
Grahams
73oth Ends of the Diagonali

0 1-

I I

I"

I

.,

success at all, require an audience
with credulity fully as long-eared as
their own.
Let "Jimmie the adtaker" find it!
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited.and Express Cars-
6:oo a ym, 7:00 a.m :oo- a.m., 9:o5I
a.m. and hourly to 9:05 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and
Severy two hours to 9:47 P.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7:oo a.m.
and every two hours to 9:eo p. m.,
i1t:00 p.m. To Ypsilanti only- 1:40
p.M., 1:15 am.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m.,
12T:io p.m.
To Jason and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at
8:47 p.m.
4I

ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
Schedtie in Efect October iT, 1920
Central Tine (Slow Time D
P.M. AM. P.M. P.M.
3:45 7:45..-Adrian. ..s 4 8:45
S:Co ::3o ....Clinton, t2,o 5 :oo
:1~5 9:1.5 ..Saline . 1..a:r5 7:15
5:15 o:e'5 Ar0.nn ArborLv. 10:45 6:45
Chamber of Commerce bldg.
D-Daily. X-Daily except Sundays
and llnlida' s. frtiday and Saturday speccia
bus for students leaves Adrian 1:45. leave:
u1 1XrOor 4 :45
JAMES .H. PLL1OTT. Proprietor
Phone 46-

711

TO'DEO-ANN ARBOR BIV
Curs leave for Toledo 7:10 A. 31
2 1'. M. and 5 P. M. Except Sun
day. Sundays at 8:00, 11:00 am
8:30.
.-------------------- --- ,--*--' --. . .

i''4
k:

SPECIAL
Suits with extra Trousers
$35-$3S--$40
HORACE CLAVEAU
\o. So. StateSt.

:

{
{ I IIR rM 4 I Y T I1Mi

A'

Editors-
ph Byers
. Iileshdorfer
A. Donahue

Harry Hoey
:. C.Almiarty
J. I;. Mack

s Eitr.......Walaec F. El1+ott
en's Editor.. ..Marion Koch
ay Magazine Editor ....11. A. Donahue1
c Editor.................E. 1I. Ailes
0;r Vitor ..........Buckley C. Robtnes
Editorial Board
1 Kerr Maurice Berman
Einstein s Eugene Carmichael
Assistants
cy IT. Armstrong Franklin D. llepburn
y l ielfield Winona A. Iibbard
;1 illington I'dward J. lIfigginas
n i' ownenneth C. "ellar
Clark Elizabeth Liebermann,
f Connable . John McGinnis
dette Cote Samuel Moore
n 1. Coughlin M. 1I. -Pryor
h pstein V. 1. Rafferty
Fiske Robert G. Ramsay
.;kJ linghot se 5. 11%. 11^ iti-h
cr W. Goodspeed Soll 3. Schnitz
a Goulder Philip M. Wagne:
il/tilatgrim'
BUSINESS STAFF .
Telephone 160
BUSINESS MANAGER'
ALBERT J. PARKER
li.ing......JohnJ . Ilamel, Jr.
~.Walter K. Scherer
riing .........Lawrenced I1. avrot
iclion . E.. .dward F. Conlin
writing ............David J. M, Park
ltioni............ownsend 11. Woale
L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants
l d. sraydn Wanm. IT. Good
ne . 111nne Clyde L. Hagerman
C. 1I; .:in .henry Freud.
fPutmar. Clayton Purdy.
I;A' rmantrout J. B. Sanzenbacher
iari 11. Reidl, Jr. Clifford Mitts
Ad L.I-ale io-a,;Ml,'achren
1. Roesser Louis M. Dexter
S. Morton C. Wells Christie
"s A. Dryer Edward B. Ridle
ert W. Cooper

MY BOILS.
What makes my sleeping always:
tough?
What makes my pillows, Oh so raugh?
What makes my voice so mean and
gruff?
MY BOILS.
What makes the doctor's bills so high?
What makes me cut out sweets and

TAKING NOTES
(O. S. U. Lantern)
Note-taking in University classes is'
a real test of the student's ability to
distinguish important points front un-
important ones. In every class one
may- see students industriously taking
down every word that is uttered by
the instructor. It matters not. that
the same thought is repeated in sev-
eral ways for the sake of explanation.
Each statement. is religiously taken
down by the student.J

rA

1923
1
8J
15

APR~IL .< 1,923

2
9
1{
30

3
10
1;
21

4
11
pi

.
12
2 19

6
13

7
14
21
28

V 1
t
C
. I

pie?

When examination time comes it is

T7STiia# ":mnirnc. fhn i #__Iir, on .,i, , ,.,n#

Whnat . makes the nut-house almost j
nigh?
THE VARSITY GLEE MY BOILS.t
- Desirable and praiseworthy was thej
publicity accorded Michigan in the re- What makes my neck in torture swell?
cent Glee Club tour. The club was What makes me need a padded cell?
received popularly and enthusiastical- What makes me wish I were in ((le-
lv in the few cities it visited, and a leted)?
higher respect for Michigan was a MY BOILS.
brought home to the several thousands . uiinell Cares.
who witnessed the concerts. * * *
There was a time, not very far back, THE IIENDECAMERON
when Michigan spread her name vivid- Rodney Snedeker was in love! le
ly as far east as New York and as far loved with the intense passion so char--
west -as the coast through the medium acteristic of all Snedekers. iis was
of her Glee club organization. That an intense and passionate disposition,
was a time when the Glee club was and he wooed his love, one Thisbe Wit.,
one of Michigan's most valuable fact-. liams in a manner so intense that it t
ors in extension service. But now the had practically won her. But one day
question is asked: Has not the more while walking around the city of
mundane organization, the dpera thinking of his Thisbe, a damp, dump
usurped the place. once held by the thunderstorm carme scurrying along,!
Glee club? Such should not be the and drenched him quite completely, I
case. . Imagine his-annoyance! For he had a
The Glee club has ever been the date with his Thisbe on the following,
personification of college harmony and and the storm had given him a sniffly
joyousness, of a higher character than cold. On the following evening he came
the opera; and the Glee club shoula to her house. They adjourned to the
continue to be looked upon by alt as parlor and made, as of one mind,
the representative expression of stu- toward the nice soft sophey. Immedi-
dent life. In other universities that ately upon being seated Rodney
is the case today,- and the Glee club started to woo. "Hodey," he whisper-
at those institutions holds an envied ed, "you sibply bust love be! I cad't
place among the best and most de- stad adother bidute without you! You
sirable of campus activities. do, dod't your" Thisbe viewed him

probable that he who has been so in-
dustrious in note-taking will make
only an average grade. The best marks
will go to the student who has taken
fewer notes. Then the student withi
the voluminous notebook wonderswhy
he did not stand at the head o his
class. -
The reason is evident. Nearly 4very
course covers so much work i4 the
period of a quarter that it is almost
impossible to cover all the work of th !
course thoroughly in the short time
available for "cramming."
The student who has taken 4ow
every statement, minor as well as ma-
jor points, has a conglomeration tthati
he can at the best cover only superfi-
cially in review.

MFR.
SWEA Ji t
Big Stock Always on hand
LARGE SIZES A SPECIALTY
Save a DOLLAR or more at our
Factory
We also do all kinds of Clean-
ing and Rebl Ecking of Hats at
low prices for HIGI CLASS
WORK
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 179
Where D. U. R. Stops at State

French cand American Toilet Go
At
G. CL AUDE DRAKE'
Drugs and Prescriptin Store
Corner STATE and N. UNIVERSITY
Phone 308

S

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"ThesQuarry

11I

'N'

_,- . .- ...- -.-... S

sl

NDAY APRIL 22, 1923
ditor-JULIAN ELLIS MACK1

SPRING EVENTS

After more or less anxiety as to So amid the glamour of the ann
iether spring ever would arrive it is Opera and other musical and drama
ally, with us in all its grandeur. ventures the Varsity Glee club sho
'sterclay. saw the opening baseball not be forgotten. Membership in
me of the season while tennis squad means a- constant round of pleas
d golf teamare rounding their men comradeships and enjoyment. It
to shape for. their initial contests. the iost distinguished of Michiga
eanbile plans for the greatest sex-' musical or dramatic representati
s of sprin gyents in Michigan's his-, which ever appear outside of Ann1
ry a, be .completed to assure the bor, and it will remain so to outsid
ccess of the new project bringing because"its.very name is traditiona
getlier all of the major events Of the accorded distinction in university
ason witilti the period between May Icles.
and 19. Accordingly,- much is expected
Swing Out; an Night, Father's Day, the Glee club.. It can only accomp'
e May Festivsl, baseball games and what it should if the finest vocalt
track meet with Illinois will be but ent of the campus can be listed on
me of the interesting events occcur- i roster.
ng during this brief period at which
ne Michigan will be effervescent ADRENALIN
ith the spirit for which she prides Medical men have for many ye
rself. This-occasion is the most op- experimented with means of prolo
>rtune time to have friends and par- ,ing the life of a patient on the ve
its visit the University, since doing of death. People suffering from frig
they will see the enthusiasm which ful diseases have been kept alive
irmeates the inner workings of the days on specially prepared drugs.
stitution at its very height. is,- however, out of the ordinary
Tradition, even during the football physicians to attempt to bring to
ason is never more impressive than an unborn- human being.
the pre-commencement ceremonies . New Jersey doctors recently exp
Swing Opt, Cap Night, and Senior mented upon a baby born three we
ngs. 'Underclass games represent prematurely; the drug adrenalint
-e s irited naturo of college life and 'injected several tims into the hear
usical 'indl dramatic presentations the baby. The child was brough
e cultural side. If it is the desire life and according to the physic:
any student to show others what gives every promise of surviving.
s Universlity is and means -let him Ipossibilities of thIs potent drug,
e sure to. extend them a cordial in- renalin, are unknown, but the suc
tation to'attend this week of spring achieved in these first experiment
ents -from May 1U to 19. indicatory of the wonderful f

nual with alarm. -"ph just a little doze'

atic
quld
n it
ant
t is
an's
ives
Ar-'
ters
ally
cir-
of
lish
tal-
its
ears
ergi
ght-
for
It
for
life
perl-
eeks
was
't of
t to
iane
Tha
ad-
cess
is is
eats

cold," he explained. "But snuggle up i
to be, This. ad say't you dod't bidd be
so buch. Thisbe arose in a hough,;
"Young man," she said, "you are posi--
tively crude. You need never see me
again!" Rodney Snedeker then went
out, and drank himself to death.
BOCCAC(IO.
* .* ...
Yes, Narcissa,-I know how sonie
of us -co-Eds do pet! Too well!
What you did forget to say, tho,
was that the cat can scratch thew
king. Which it would do, were it a
real honest-to-goodness, she-
woman cat; but being sort of
a kitten I suppose it purred{
and said, "Uh, huh."
II. E. 1.
* * *

On the other hand, the student who
has had the ability to distinguish be-
tween the important and unimportant
points has before him for review an
outline of the important wortk of the
course. Minor matters have been dis-
regarded. He an cover the major
points thoroughly, and his results will
show the wisdom of this course.
Note-taking is a science. There is
almost as much anger in taking too
many notes as in faking too few. The
power to pick out important points,
developed in classroom note-taking,
will be invaluable in later life.
THE PLOT
(New York Times)
Good Americans used to smile con-
descendingly at the French for their ,
tendency to dramatize politics. Such
a cry as ",We must have a traitor"
("II nous faut un traitre") seemed
pecuriarly absurd to our superior com-
mon sense. But we are rapidly be-
coming more Gallic than the Gauls.
In our important public affairs we
must have not only a traitor but a
whole line of conspirators, apibus-
caders lying perdu. villains masquer-
ading as innocent bourgeois, assassins
and spadassins behind every wall or
hedge. Simple and rational e plana-
tions no longer stisfy. Everything.
that happens must be due to a plot.
The Mildest imaginations of melo-
drama are transferred bodily to the
political stage.
Never has this urge to tieatricality,
been more crudely displayed- than, in
the great excitement astir in certain
Republican minds over the proposal
of the President that the United
States join the World Court. This did {
not seem to the ordinary looker-on so
astounding and incredible an event.
The steps that preceded it were well
known. To eyes not bloodshot it
looked merely like a logical sequence
to what had gone before. But noth-a
ing of this will go down with ont
dramatists of politics. They instantlyj
begin- to fly around looking for con-
spirat irs, recreants and traitors. They
see the whole thing as a kind of
masked ball, into which it is their

f ind

Spring a nd warm weather--
a change from the heavier

foods of wintertime.

tite, health in o ur

You'll

wh at's best for appe-

menus

A rcade

Cl

00

Up s tairs,

Ni c k e l's

r

e

- - - --.. .. .. - - . - -'
Seasonable goods for all seasons. We now have a.full line
of goods for the spring time.

I wish somebody's paw

Would go straight out
Law.
On that southpaw from
makes the straw1
draw:

and get the
Saginaw whoI
that will not

FERRY'S LAWN SEED
FERRY'S GARDEN SEED

WHITE CLOVER SEED
FERRY'S FLOWER SEED

Pshaw!
I gnaw, I chaw,t
I tire ny jaw, my craw is raw;
That straw won't draw-it has a flaw
-it's nothing but a toy see-saw.

t

MANDEVILLE & KING FLOWER SEED
SPADING FORKS, SPADES, SHOVELS, RAKES, HOES, CULTIVA'

S

PUBLiCATION APPOINTMENTS
After a deliberate consideration of
e qualifications of each applicant,
e Board in Control yesterday select-
the men who are to head Michi-
.u's student publications during the
.ming year.
These men have achieved their post-

which the medical world may in time
perform with it, .
Adrenalin has been known to medi-
cine for a number of years; it was
used slightly during the war, but its }
true value was not recognized until
recently. If this lone case can be
taken as an indication of the- worth of
adrenalin, it is evident that it may be;

Hurraw!
Bring on the brute that bra
Haw!"
And heave him into the River
Precipitate that dumb south
makes the straw that
(iwiw.
31I
* * *
Dear Bunk,-
I think that Burnie-burnie
fectly terrible to write that
me and my garter falling d
the garter, I mean. But I

iys, "Ilee
Kaw.
paw who

IN FACT EVERYTHING

THE GARDENS.

; I

will not duty to make their way as honest
men in order to pull off the disguises
XNEW. of scoundrels. Of course, President
Harding himself never figures in the
1 exposure except as the good, kind-
was per- hearted man who had been imposed
In about I upon by intriguers. But there is no
own, just end of candidates for the role of chief
want to villain. Secretary Hoover disputel it

TO IMPROVE THE LAWNS AND

alspar varnish and paints and Arbroid cement to re

ar

EE

the canoe and make it look like new and be safe to ride in.
MAKE OUR STORE YOUR HEADQUARTERS FOR HARDWARE AND

ACCESSORIES.

WE WILL TREAT YOU RIGHT.

,-, -, . .

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