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April 20, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-04-20

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143;

EIGHT PACES

ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 1923

EIGHT PAGE&

_. _ .: - - ---- -- r ___._-

\
FIVE
IN

Master Criminal
Admits He Made
Wall Street Bomb

Pope May Appoint
American Cardinal
TL H
Professor Hauser of Dijon niversity
to S)pak in 'Natural Science
Audittorium
WILL DISCUSS "EON-OMIC -
SITUATION IN FRANCE" . *

"Garg Assails
Campus Leaders flfI*E WfYND

"Big Men of the Campus" will be
flailed cruelly and completely today
when the April issue of the Gargoyle,
a number devoted exclusively to crit-

bi

PPROPBRTION TO

i

TO

L WILLI
ESDAY
Governiinfg
lied

of men to be voted on
elections were made by
tions yesterday. The
hese nominees will be
e all-campus elections
h the exception of the
he Student council on-
pus will ballot by spe-
i Wednesday.
Fominees Named
ominated for the presi-
Union are L. Perkins
wrence E. Dooge, '24;
, '24E; John P. Law-r
hilip J. Schneider, '25L.
naugh, '24 and William
will appear onr the
as candidates for re-

Prof. Henri Hauser, of the Univer-
sity of Dijon, France, will deliver a
lecture at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
He will speak on "The Present Eco-
nomic Situation in France".
Professor Hauser ;s an internation-
ally known historian, and is conced-
ed to be the greatest living authority
on the economic history of the Midd;e
Ages. During the war he was called
to the Sorbonne, Paris. At this timeI
he wrote on the German "peacefulI
penetration" policy, pointing out how
this country endeavored to get an eco-
nomic hold on friendly countries. #
At the present time, he is an ex-
change professor at Harvard. He is
now engaged in making a tour of the
Universities of Michigan, Wisconsin,
Chicago, and Minnesota, in an endeav-'

icism of this clan, will appear. From,
a fantastic cover that too truely typi-
fies the average of our mighty leaders
to a final dirty dig on the last page, "KEEP
the Gargoyle lends itself heartily to its sA
task.
Even though the preface advises the Stude
gentle reader to "chuck the Garg, th BuI
heave it into the physics building con- ment t(
crete mixer and forget the lurid things paths t
the terrible sheet can divulge" it is lawns7
obvious that such can not be the case. newly p
The preface also advises the reader allowed
to "have the worst at once" and start Ferti
with the book reviews. They are by first ti
Lee O'Jayh and tell about a book thing
called "More Gargoyles" which des- reclaim
cribes some of the Big Men clan. appear
Poetry blossoms forth in a style that
is exceedingly like that Chimes usual-
ly boasts. The poetry, credited to:
Chimes authors, is called the "Huron
River Anthology." Of like literary
merit in this section is "Our TownBLIEF

OFF THE GRASS"
Y GROUNDS' OFFICIALS
nts have been asked by
lding and Grounds depart-
o refrain from using the
hey have worn across the
this winter so that the
lanted grass there may be
to grow.
lizer is being used for the
me this year, and every
possible is being done to
the bare spots which
each Spring.

'1

BATTLE ABOU'fl UI
FUNDS FROM 1921
0 LOOMS
f PROBABLE DIVISI(
FINANCES SUG
State Control to Be Exe:
in Necessary Account
Lansing, April 19.--(Q
With the ways and means
of the House having fixe
i as the building' appropria

ty
1s 1
Gd
ltic

PLANE CRASHES

University of Michigan one
tIe over this account remai
settled.

Archbishop Edward J. Hnna, of Si

E

f

nnA {!wn !'erg.~r mu -r~r lfAnj- l~ra/

The candidates for vice-president
lected from the Junior classes are
follows: literary? James Dresbach,
iomas G. Kindel, Donald W. Stake-
e, engineering, C. A. Campbell, and
lliam C. Kratz; law, Stewart R.
yer and Bowen Schumacher; med-
1, Howard B. Hoffman and Carl-
n B. Pierce; and combined, William
Henderson and Gilbert C. Ely.
'he Student Christian association
minated . Harry C. Clark, '24, and
Hlard Pryor, '24, for the presidency
the organization. Perry fHayden,
, Alfred B. Connable, '25, ant Rob-
Straub, '24 will appear on the
mpus balot as candidates fo- sec-*
ary of the association.
S. C. A. Petitions Ditt Wednesday
Petitions for any of the offices of
e S. C. A. must be in the hands of
e nominating committee of which
ss McFarland, '23, is chairman, by
'clock Wednesdayafternoon. After
g turned in to the nominating
nmittee, they will have to be passed
on bythe cabinet and sanctioned
fore they may be put upon the
'np11s ballot. While no vice-presi-
nts will be put on the campus bal-
for vote, the presidents of the
arch groups will hereafter auto-
tically be members of the cabinet.
ese innovations are made in ac-
rdance with the new rulings recent-
passed by cabinet of the associa-

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f
" i
1
jj$
,E((((:.'
I ;
.
,'
.
:
1
:
',:

lerbert L. Wilson
Herbert L. Wilson, slayer, mail rob-
her, bandit and master criminal, has
confessed to Lo3 Angeles police, that;
he made the bomb exploded in Wall
street in 1920, killing 39 persons. Un-
der sentence of death for murder, Wil-
son made his statement, declaring he
sold the bomb to one Max Wolfe, in-
stigator of the bombing.
Delightful Combination of Popular
and Classical Airs Displays
Concert Ability
DANCING AND SOLO MUSIC'
ARE VAUDEVILLE FEATURES

ix men will appear on the ballot
im which 3 will be chosen for
ces on the Board in Control of
hdetics. The men are Egbert R. Is-
1, '23; Raymond Arndt, '24; M. B.
hl, '25L; William Z-I. Merner, '24;
wart Boyer, '24L; and Kenneth F.
rr, '24.
fJigibility of most of the candidates
s been certified but a few minor'
anges may be necessary in the lists

Michigan's Concert band gave a
home performance last night in. Hill
Auditorium following its an-
nual spring trip. It is adnir-
able that such a thing should be,
exceedingly so, for it gives membersf
of the campus a chance to see whatI
their band has been doing and to hear
for themselves the reasons for the,
success of the band on its tour.
"The Victors" Opens Program
There is something about "The Vic-
tors" that always pleases, and so it
was a fitting number with which to
start the concert. From then until
the final "Yellow and the Blue" there
was a delightful combination present-
ed, with the classical predomination
just a little too much, but with varia-
tions enough to keep interest fully
aroused and strongly centered.
Burton E. L. Hyde, '25M, ushered
in the several soloists with his mar-
imbaphone selections. Hyde has that
appeal to the audience that makes it
possible for him to hold them abso-
lutely within his grasp, and he uses
his appeal in a manner that made himJ
respond to encores again and again.
Eccentric Dance Given
Vocal selections by Frank J.. Ryan,
Jr., S. of ;M., marked another of the
soloistic intermissions from 'the bandj
music. Ryan is gifted with an exceed-
ingly rich lyric tenor voice, and so
uses his gifts thathelehasa marked,
himself as an artist of no mean abil-
ity. Harry S. Gould, '23, gave an ec-
centric dance as another feature.
All in all the concert was success-
ful, exceedingly successful, and the
directors of the band can be compli-
mented on the maner in which they
have laid before audiences over the
entire state a program rendered in a
manner that is worthy of a Michigan
band.

UI LV~AIJIUI L~ eLUIUI1IC ~ILU~tUII ~Fraincisco dI U
or co tx amthe economic lsiturtion in anu own UN I.
his country today. The lecture will According to ace Thompson, -i
be given in English. oae s ,at- IN IAYKihL
- - --- --- --e oftheInited States e ba ssy auB
' . ,e, Arcbshop]fanna illbe-UU REPORT OF STARVING WORKMEN
si Yated the third cardinal in the Un- RoTd IG LB A DON FOX ISLAND IS
ted States. Thompson says the popa DENIED i
iEs,==L' x"thoroughly Aneicas card-
MEiNIKRETNG Tn~tndc that of all ORAT-
HIRE TONIGHTrd hbishop Hanna best i1a-Northport, Mich., April 19.(-By A. b
[iis u to the requirements. P.)-Efforts to rescue the nine men b
- Constitutional Changes Strike of and one woman reported to be starv-
I BANQUET WILL PRECEDE MONTI- iIEight Names Forme'l an .t
oeSESSION OF )ETOIT ing on South Fox island, 18 miles from
SOCIETY R CIST fTIfN Tfl on Ballot the mainland in Lake Michigan, were
---U ----Utemporarily halted this afternoonc
Coming to Ann Arbor for the Irst LECTURE PROGRAM when Lieut. Whitehead's airplanei
time since 1919, the Detroit branch of ILPROVES PROFITABLE frum Mt. Clements, crashed through a
the American Pharmaceutical associ- ~~ fro Mt. Glmnt rase through
ation will hold its monthly meeting; toU Constitutional changes involving attempt to make a landing. Neither
night in room 151 of the Chemistry the elimination c the eight de - Lieut. Whitehead nor a Detroit news- t
building/ The meeting will be pre- Smuall Percentage of Stun Boly h
ceded by a dinner at 6:15 o'clock at Enrolled Necessitates gatesat-large for . the Oratorical paper man who accompanied him
the Michigan Union, to be attended by Extension of ie board who are usually chosen at the rinjurdaaged hut lawas so wedged
a large delegation of prominent phar- --all-campus elections, were made at a in the breaking ice that a crew of
macists and their wives from Detroitintebakgicthtarw'.o
D LITERAR COLLEGE IEADSTRDmeeting of the board held Wednes- men were unable to extricate it in
College'of Pharmacy. _ERT E day evening in Mason hall. In the time for a flight this evening to Fox
The program following the dinner islacuns' 1 s h appeared on the Thaiwc
will consist of five short talks by the On account of t. light registration The airplane went through the ice
members of the faculty of the Col- yesterday, two booths will be open for ballot from which eight are chosen as abopt 80 yards off shore. The wings
lege of Pharmacy Professor C. C. Glov- the benefit of those .who were unable members of the board. As a result of resting on the ice prevented .the plane v
er, secretary of the college, will talk to register at that time. Anyone in this action only eight names will be from sinking. An appeal was sent to
on "Methods for Assaying Pepsin"; any school or college may register at ;on the ballot in connection with the Mt. Clements for another plane.
Dean' E. H. Krauss, of the Summer either of these booths. One of these Oratorical association nominations The accident occured about 3:30 s
session, will discuss the "Revised Cur- will be located in front of the Engi- and from this the president, vice- o'clock this afternoon. Lieut. White-
ricula of the- College of Pharmacy" neering Arch, and the other in front president, secretary and treasurer head and his companion, drawn to
Professor Charfes H. Stocking will of the Library. f wil be picked. shore by rope, directed efforts to re-
talk on the subject, "Training the Pre- Idcntification unnecessary Three Delegatesat-Large lease their plane.
scription Pharmacist"; William J. Mc- The system of checking which has In place of the eight delegates, the Traverse City, April 19.(-By A. P.)
Gill, instructor in pharmacy, will been inaugurated by the class officers board itself will appoint three dele -Edward Horn, '23, of Suppons Bay,
talk on "Some New Methods in Drug who are in charge of the booths gates-at-large Ffrom the dampus to one of the threemen who fought their n
Assay Work"; and Leonard H. Wag- makes it unnecessary for those who act on the important commnittees of way from South Fox island throughi
ener, instructor in pharmacy, will register today to bring any identifica- the association. The board feels that heavy ice floes and heavy waters to
discuss the results lie has recentlyt this will be advantageous in that it Northport denied here, today, he had
obtained in connection with research n w thm will cut down the membership from said that nine men and a woman were
work on aspirin. so unwieldy a number to a smaller'h
The women's. registration was ox- unih a nu bstarving on the island.-
ceptionally light, according to those group which will be able to transact _______ a____
ion ageof the, bohs.Few of thse business business in a more efficient
in charge of the booths. Few of the !mannerITRAVEtL PHOTOSc
a LE U LII [ I women seemed to realize that they Edward T. Racsdell, '23, president EXFIBITED I N
were allowed votes in the coming f the hoard, annonced that the Ora-
election, although they will vote for torical association lecture course pro- atEinh ellIAL4 HALL
all the officers in the general election gram had cost $4,000 for the past-
hcept the officers of the Union and rand that these !expenses hd Travel photographs, which weret
RECEPTION LINE AND ORDERI OF the Student council. been easily met and a balance had taken i the Near East by George R.b
GRAND MARCh IS The literary college led all the been set aside. "This balance," said Swain of the Latin department, are oni
ANNOUNCED other schools and colleges in the Ramsdehl, "will be added to the ed- exhibition from 1 to 5 o'clock every
number of students r gistered, with ucational fund established several afternoon this week in the west gal-t
Detailed plans for the Military Ball, the Law school second and the Engi- years ago by the board for the pur- lery of Memorial hall.n
which is to be held next Friday in the !neers, Medics, and Dents following in pose of aiding students in public Mr. Swain was a member of the h
combined gymnasiums of the Univer- the order named. . speaking" University of Michigan expedition to t'
Isity, were made last night when the "Judging from the light registra- The lecture course which was held the Near East in 1919 and 1920. Theu
committee in charge of the formal tion, it would seem that the students this year is said to be the most costly nhotographs, of which there are near-..
dance met. don't realize that no one will be al- one sponsored by a university and the ly 200,' include not only subjects of
Those who are to act as members lOwed to vote in either of the cont- expenses of securing the various le- archaeological interestbut;also views.t
of the reception line as announced ing elections unless he has been prey- turers were greater than before here of scenery and the every day life of
last night are: Gordon Gale, '23L, gen- iously registered," said Burton Dun- the raerterh e ene an the every dalfe
eral chairman of th'e committee, and lop, '23, chairman of the Council com- Centraeizaion Plan Adopted Asia Minor, Palestine, Egypt, Patmos
Mrs. Gale, Carl H1. Smith, 24L, and mittee on registration, yesterday. Another change in the constitution and Greece.
Mrs. Smith, Major Robert Arthur, C. "Last year hundreds of students who of the board was made which pro- This collection is. now a part o
A. C., U. S. A., and Mrs. Arthur, Major had forgotten to register were turned vided for the centralization of the he visual instruction material of the
I Willis Shippam, C. A. C., U. S A.andjaway from the polls on election day. purchasing power of the association Extension division of the University,c
Mrs. Shippam, and Philip H. Gold- Ti' campus elections must be un- in the hands of the financial manager. and will be loaned for limited periods
smith, '23E, and Miss C. Griffiths. questionably fair, and the only way to Under this new plan no bill can be ato the various schools and colleges of
The firing of guns, followed by a make them so is by a rigidly enforced incurred without the approval of thle Michigan.
bugle call, will announce the grand systemrof retstration."a'pr__valo__te__Michigan.__
march which will bg after the sec- s manager. Nominations for the next.
ond regular dance, and which will be year's board were also made at the 1T
lead by Gorden M. Gale, '23L, and !f [meeting. .dpera Trouts
Mrs. Gale. {CNETPO0 Scheduled Today t
Directly after the grand march ae
picture will be aiken of thedmantion.,ibPT ICTOMORROVV Union Featured Final tryouts for the choruses of
The Varsity Quintette will furnish en- _InPer___dCa next year's Union Opera are to be
tertainment at. a late period in the held from 4 to 5:30 o'clock this after-a
tertninentath lateperod in teig Pictures for the prize photograph . ... ...-..-.---.--....--.-. noon and from 7:30 to 9:30 o'clock
evening hile the luncheon is being ' contest being conducted by "The Mich! this evening at the Mimes theatre.
served. 'gan Optic", campus rotogravure nrag- An article desribg the Michigan The general tryouts todayare the
Uniforms are preferred for the mens azine, must be in the hands of the Union occupies the entire issue of the only oneshihly bhd. No In
dress, though formal attire is allow-'edlitors of that publication by tomor- March number of "The American
able. No corsages wil 'be worn. Danc row night. A prize of $5 will be paid Architect" which appeared recently. dividual tryouts will be held.
ing will continue from 9 to 2 oclock. the winner of the contest. The article is written by Mr. Pond, Those students who are to try out
Robert L. Campbell, '24, will be pro- Requirements for pictures submit- of the concern of Chicago architects for parts in the men's chorus will
yost. marshal in charge of the mili- ted make only photographs of a glos- of that name, who were architects of do so this afternoon. Tryouts for'
tary police. sy finish eligible for competition. They the Union at the time of its construe- specialty dancing will be made1
- °--- ~must be of a general campus inter- tion.,through appointment with E.- Mrti-
Georgetown Defeats F. of Pitt. est, and will be judged by the editors Not only does the article describe mer Shuter, Union dramatics direct'or.
Washington, April 19-(By A.P.)- of the Optic on this basis. Each pho- the Union in detail and give complete
Georgetown university defeated the tograph must be accompanied by a plans and specifications, but it discus- "Honors Convocation" Motion Defeated
University of Pittsburg in a track and written explanation of the subject of ses the merits and advantages of col- A motion to hold an "Honors Con-
field meet here today 83 to 43. Jimmy the picture. ';lege Unions in general and the Mich- vocation" was tabled indefinitely yes-
Conolly, in winning the mile run, All members of the student body or igan Union in particular. The work terday in the conference of deans. The'
clipped 2.5 of a second off the South of the faculty of the University are that the Union here has undertaken measure was proposed for the purpose I
Atlantic record for that distance. His eigible to enter in the contest. Pho- since the time of its establishment is of obtaining approval for a special!

It concerns the $1,374,000 r
n the University 1921 appr
unreleased by the state adm-hi
board. All along, with his
of building requests, Dr. Burt
dent of the University reiter
hey were based on the relea
balance of the 1921 funds whi
be forthcoming. It was coun
to take care of the first un
Literary college, the foundo
two units of which has be
pleted; also to take care of i
cal building, and to establish
000 cotningent fund.
Hospital Funds Availa
But the administration be
thought otherwise. In repot
the University building bill, C
Nelson Farrier, of the ways ai
coimittee, made it plain
committee efforts will be ma
lease it. The' situation le
University with the excava
foundation for two units of
erary college, but with no r
go ahead.
The appropriation would
vided as follows:
$2,300,00 for the hospital
000 the first year and, $1,00
second year.
A lump sum appropriatfo:
200,000 to be divided $600,1
year and to be distributed by
versity for a heating plant, c
and the medical building.
It is estimated that there
not more than $200,000 avai
the medical school after tl
items in the lump sum appr
have been taken care of.
Rider Cut Out
The appropriation would f
university virtually with ou
attached. The committee eu
clause attachedaby the house i
committee designed to coip
establment of a hiomoeop;
partment. It also provided
university may spend the It
appropriation entirely at its d
the only state control to be
being that of accounting ai
ang.
The bill came out of the
tee after a hectic session thi
nearly all night and was
again today. Committee
took sharply divided stands
university items, according t
sentative Farrier.
It is believed the house w
the measure as reported out.
CHINESE STUDEe
PRESENT PRO(
Chinese students of the en
college presented an "All Ch
gram at the entertainment
Engineering society smoker
night in the assembly roor
'Union.
Various addresses by Chi
dents on the political con
their country and on en1gin
carried on there were promi
tures of the entertainment.I
sword dance and a specialty
group of engineers from Cl
also given. K. Y. Tang, '23
Tavares, '25L, Hawaiian n
furnished the musical attra

I Board Maes Choice
is for Oratorical Board
ext year as appointed by
oard are: president, Don-
'24 and J. K. Dunn, '24;
t, Lyman J. Glasgow, '25,
B. Johnson, '25; secre-
a S. Diekoff, '24, - and
dynast, '24; and treasurer,

10

ache,

nk
16;
I21~

H. Backstrom, '24, and Ed-
C. Prophet, '24. The usual, list
names appearing on the ballot
which eight are chosen as dele-
at-large will be eliminated.
iominations for president of the
i will be made until after the
I Student council election. Due
changes in the council consti-
the nominees for president this
vil be named by the outgoing
I from members elected to the
council and will be voted on in
,neral campus election on IMay 2.
tough the nominating committee
student council met yesterday
Dose candidates for next year's
il the names of the nominees
ot be published until tomorrow
ng due o the necessity of in-
ating the eligibility of the

E
{
r
w #
f.
' tt
k
2

-.-R.A.B3.
Whimsies Will
Be Out May 1

k
3
f

- a#a

ndidates.
Go Easy on the
Butler, Kid
The most important requisite
to wealth is saving. The ac-
cumulation of the foolishly spent
diges in the City of Ann Arbor
for one week would be sufficie!'t
capital to start a man in busi-

1 Whimsies special edition which isj
to appear on the campus May 1, will
be ' dedicated to Chase Osborne and
the other unnamed person who made
possible the Robert Frost fellowship
fund, and will be. a testimonial to the
work being done at the University as
a result of this fund, editors of the
I publication said yesterday. Poems
submitted in the poetry contest which
is being conducted by Whimsies will
be published in the issue.
Prof. Roy W. Cowden, of the rhet-
oric department, the Whimsies staff,
and a prominent poet, not yet named,
will judge the manuscripts submitted
in the contest. Poems submitted must
reach Whimsies editors by tomorrow.
Prizes of $15, $10, and $5 are to be
awarded.

ROYAL WEDDING PLANS
AWAIT KING'S APPROI
London, April 19.-(By A.
-Plans for the reception ,
wedding breakfast to follow
marriage of the Duke of I
and Lady Elizabeth Bow
Lyon April 26 are complete
only await the approval of Ii
George. The affair will t
place in Buckingham Palace
The state dining room and
great supper room will be t

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