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October 08, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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VOL, XXXIII. No. 13

TWENTY PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1922

TWENTY PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

,= ......

TODD' PRESENTS-
ARlT COLLECTION
TO UNIVERSITYI

PAiNTINGS BY AMERICAN
FOREIGN ARTISTS
INCLUDED

ANDI

CANADIAN FOREST
FIRE TOLL MOUNTS
Colbalt, Oct. 7.-Provincial police
have identified 48 bodies recovered
by searching parties from the north-
ern Ontario forest area swept by
flames last Wednesday. Property loss,
it is estimated, may reach $16,000,000.
Refugees from the outlying districts
are still arriving here and are being
cared for by the Red Cross and other
relief agencies. Much needed sup-,
plies of bread, bedding and blankets
arrived by special trains today from
North Bay.
The Ontario government has ordered
an official investigation of the cause
of the fire.
-9 E P 'ILHOLD MEET HERE

GI1ANTS WIN 4TH
CONTEST, 4 TO 3:
1NEED ON MORE

y

BIG GAME IS PLAYED ON

4

MICHIGAN WALLOPS
CASE TTERAM 48 TO 0

FIELD

IN UNUSUALLY MUDDY
CONDITION

GALLERY IN MENORIAL
HALL TO CONTAIN GIFT

Valuable Oriental

Manuscripts, I

Texts on Art and Science
Also Given

"One of the most important gifts
ever presented to the university in
recent years," is the characterization
of the Albert M. Todd art and book
collection, the presentation of which
was announced yesterday in the of-
fice o President Marion L. Burton-
The gift includes paintings by mod-
ern American, French and English
artists and books on art, natural
science, specimens of early printing
and other sundry topics. The books
are vahable according to Librarian
Wlliam Bishop, not only for their
content but for the beauty and rarity
of their bindings and decorations.
Connttee to make Choices
Mr. Todd is a former congressman
and a resident of Kalamazoo. His col-
lection is at present hung in his home
and office building and it is expected
that the transfer to the University
glieries will be effected within two
years.. The selection of the works
which will be hung in one of the Me-
morial Hallgalleries, will be made
by a committee of five faculty mem-
bers headed by President Burton. Ac-
cording to the contract, the gallery
will be decorated and furnished by
Mr. Todd. The books will become the
property of the University library.
President Burton, Prof. Bruce Don-
aldson, and Librarian Bishop are es-
pecially pleased with the gift because
due to the great value of the books
and paintings the University could
not hope to acquiresuch a collection
by purchase, and because of their
beauty, their worth to the two de-
partm ents is almost incalcuable.
English School Represented
A tong works b infeibers of the
English school, the following painters
are represented: Sir David Murray,
Olsen the noted marine painter and
Blamare Young. In the American
school works by Reuterdahl, Birge-
Harrison, Kenyan, Rosen Pierson, and
Curran are included.
Among the younger French artists
Regaud, Guillinet, and Ponchil La-
ronze are represented
Oriental Manuripts
The books include rare Oriental
manuscripts in Arabic and Persian, a
Koran written In the Garden of Al-
lah in 1569, and the first printed
Greek bible and first testament, 'as
well as the works on natural history.
Among the latter is th'e collection of
books on Birds by the late John
Gould Sothern. Librarian Bishop de-
clares that the beauty of binding and
design is in itself sufficient to make
the books a valuable gift. As to the
actual merit of the works, he declared
that they were "indispensible" in the
study of the' topics which they dis-
cus.
PRESS CLUB WILL
BANQUET TUESDAY
Members of the Students' Press
club will hold their first supper and
regular meeting at 6:05 o'clock Tues-
day evening in the Michigan Union.
Speakers for the first meeting will
be Prof. Fred N. Scott, head of the
department of Rhetoric and Journal-
ism, and Ralph Carson, '17, returned
Rhodes scholar from MIchigan. Pro-
fessor Scott will speak on the topic,
"Not That it Matters" and Mr. Car-
son will talk on "Student Life at Ox-
ford'
As 'a feature of the first meeting,
music will accompany the supper,
which will be served between 6:15
and 7:00 o'clock. The meeting pro-
per will begin at 7 o'clock and ad-
journ at 8.
According to announcement by of-
ficers of the club, admission will be
by membership card. Tickets for the
supper will be on sale by a represnt-
ative of the club at each class in the
journalism department on Monday
and Tuesday, or they may be pur-
chased at the door Prospective mem-
bers who have not yet joined the club
will be admitted and allowed to sign
up at the meeting. Visitors if in the

company of a member will be admit-
ted without ticket.
PROF. J. S. HINE, OF OHIO
STATE, TO SPEND YEAR HERE
Prof .Tames S. Hine, of the entom-

Prof. Iigbie
at

to Address
Convention
Banquet

Delegates

ROSS, 23E, HAS CHARGE OF
ALL PLANS FOR CONFERENCE
Prof. Henry H. Higbie of the elec-
trical engineering department will be
the principal speaker at the conven-
tion banquet of the national confer-
ence of Tau Beta Pi, national honor-
ary engineering society, to be held
from Wednesday until Saturday this
week at the Union. More than 40
delegates are expected, including the
secretary-treasurer, Prof. R. C. Mat-
thews of the University of Tennessee.
Daily business sessions, a tour of
Ann Arbor, a smoker' at the Union
at which Secretary Matthews will
give his report, and an excursion to
Detroit for the purpose of inspecting
industrial plants will occupy the time
of the delegation while here. The ac-
tivities will be concluded by the an-
nual convention banquet which will
be held in 'the assembly hall of the
Union, Saturday evening.
John W. Ross, '23E, president of the
Michigan chapter, is in general charge
of arrangements and will be assist-
ed by the following committee chair-
men : program committee, W. F.
Moore, '23E; banquet committee, D.
C. Seitz, '23E; smoker committee Wil-
liam J. Piper, '23E; reception commit-
tee, Franklin Johnston, grad; De-,
troit trip, Clyde R. Paton; grad.,
Michigan's chapter will be repre-
sented by Lee O. Case, grad., who was
its representative when the society
held its convention in Pittsburg last
year. All active chapter and alumni'
members will attend the banquet and
smoker.

YANKEES IN LEAD AT
END OF FIRST INNING
N. Y. Natiouls Put Four Runs Across
Plate During Fifth
Frame
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 7.-Rain drops and
brain flops sent the New York Ameri-
cans down to another defeat today in
their almost hopeless fight with the
local National leaguers for the base-
ball championship of the world.
The Giants made four runs, barely
enough to win, because they were
bright boys and fast on the muddy
path, which was covered with rain all
during the battle. The Yankees got
only three runs because they fought
and moved slowly, or not at all, in the
high moments of their test.
The Yankees started out with a
rush, and furious pounding of the ball
in the first inning gave their under
hand pitcher, Carl Mays, a two run
lead. In the fifth the Giants began
a hit and iun attack. Helped alonb by
freakish bounds of the muddy ball
this rally sent four runs across the
plate.
Ward, the Yankee second baseman,
got his second home run of the series
in the seventh, but there was no one
on base. Once more in the ninth,, the
Yankees were able to hit Hart Mc-
Quillen- hard enough to warrant a
score, but they went down without
one because of faulty base running.
REAPPOINT RUTHVEN
STATE NATURALIST
In the reorganization of the state
government, Dr. A., G. 'Ruthven, of
the zoology department, has been re-
appointed chief naturalist in charge
of the biological survey. The biolog-
ical survey with the geological sur-
vey constitutes a division of the de-
partment of conservation. He will
have charge of all investigations re-
lating to animal and plant life of the
state.

St. Johns 9, Washington 3.
Tufts 6, Bates 0.
U. of Detroit 34, Duquesne 0.
Yale 18, N. Carolina 0.
Columbia 43, Amherst 6.
U. of Pittsburg 0, Lafayette 7.
Purdue 10, James Milliken 0.
Mich. Aggies 7, Albion 7.
New Hampshire State 7, Norwich 0.
Army 13, Kansas 0.
Harvard 20, Holy Cross 0.
Dartmouth 19, Maine 0.
Williams 14, Middlebury 7.
Pennsylvania 27, U. of the South 0.
Cornell 66, Niagara 0.
Haverford 0, Stevens 0.
Colorado 24, Ames 0.
Northwestern 17, Beloit 0.
Indiana 0, DePauw 0.
Wisconsin 41, Carleton 0.
Dennison 14, Wilmington 3.
Union 6, St. Lawrence 6.
Wesleyan 21, Bowdin 0.
Georgetown 19, Lebanon Valley 6.
Carnegie Tech 27, Geneva 6.
Renselear 6, Hobart 0.
Johns Hopkins 2, Mt. St. Mary's 0.
Rochester 19, Hamilton 0.
Princeton 5, Virginia 0.
Drake 16, Cornell 0.
Georgia Tech. 19, Davison 0.
Nebraska 66, S. Dakota 0.
Minnesota 22, N. Dakota 0.
Kalamazoo Normal 7, Valparaiso 0.
U. of Chicago 20, U. of Georgia 0.
Army 13, U. of Kansas 0.
U. of Iowa 61, Knox 0.
Ohio State 5, Ohio Wesleyan 0.
Notre Dame' 26, St. Louis 0.
LIT ANDOLAW STUDENTS
COUNCiL URGES FULL ATTEND.
ANCE TO CHOOSE IMPORT-
ANT CLASS OFFICERS
Class meetings in the lit school and
the law school will be held Tuesday
to nominate the officers for the year.
Since the last nominations made by
these classes last week were declar-
ed invalid, on account of insufficient
attendance at the meetings, it was de-
termined to hold the meetings again
and renominate- If there is not a
sufficient attendance at these gather-
ings, the Student Council will- again
declare all nominations void. The
Council takes the stand that the offi-
cers of these schools and classes are
of such importance that it is not just
to allow nominations to be made by
such a small minority of the class.
Precedent class meetings have been
well supported and have had a' full at-
tendance, and indications point to- an-
other full attendance at the Tues-
day's meeting. The duties of the class
officers are important and numerous,
and it is extremely necessary that a
great majority of the class turn out
so that nominations will be a fair rep-
resentation of the classes ideas.
At 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in
Newberry hall, the Senior lits will
hold their meeting. The Junior lits
will meet at 4 o'clock in the auditor-
ium of Univedsity hall. Soph lits
will meet at 5 o'clock in University
Hall- The meeting places of all other
classes will be announced later and
will be placed on the bulletin boards.
The final result of the elections on
the Senior Enginering class follow:
president, J. W. Ross; vice-president,
E. C. Haug; secretary, D. A. McKin-
ney; and treasurer, L. W. Kirkpat-
rick. The withdrawal of Paul Goeb-
el from the, ballot after he had been
nominated caused the name of Wil-
liam A. Cotton to be added as he had
the third highest number of votes in
the nomination. In a case of this
kind, where one man withdraws, ac-
cording to the Council, thrule is
that the third highest 8hould be plac-
ed on the baot. '
a.E NE

NEW LIBRARY IN JUNE
Dedication ceremonies for the new
Clements library will be held on June
14 of next year, it was announced by
University officials yesterday. Dr.
J. Franklin Jameson director of the
historical research department of Car-
negie Technical Institute at Wash-
ington hs accepted an invitation to
deliver the principal address..
Dr. Jameson is a graduate of Am-
herst college and has received sev-
eral degrees from other institutions.
He is known to students of history as
an authority in the field of historical
research. He is a corresponding mem-
ber of the Royal Academy of Belgium
and a corresponding fellow to the
British academy-
Doctor Jameson became a membez
of the Carnegie staff in 1905 after hav-
ing been a member of the history de-
partment faculty of Brown, John Hop-
kins, and Chicago universities.

CROSS COUNTRY TO
ENLIST 300 MEN

dw-- Today In T'he Churches-

BRITISH DISPATCH
CURZON TO FRANCE
ON TURKISH CRISIS

Mitche l Says Activity Has
Benefits for Young.
Student

Unusuall

UNIVERSITY COACHES ANXIOUS
ABOUT SUCCESS OF SPORT
Everything is ready for the boom
expected in cross-country running
which should result in a large num-
bcr of tryouts reporting at Waterman
gymnasium tomorrow afternoon, ac-
cordirg to George Little, of the in-
tercollegiate athletic department, who
has been instrumental in organizing
the campaign for harriers. Coach Lit-
tle does not see why the University
should not have more than 300 men
out within a week.
Board Pushes Sport
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of
intercollegiate athletics, speaking of
cross-country work ,Friday, said, "The
athletic board deems it advisable that
cross-country work should be given
a very prominent program, in order,
if possible, to establish it on the same
basis as at Cornell, where four or five
hundred contestants keep the sport
alive. Men who are not good runners
develop into great runners, providing
a splendid asset to the track team and
benefit to themselves.
"The Board has therefore placed
the program in the hands of Steve
Farrell, coach of track and field
sports, Archie Hahn, freshman track
coach, and Elmer Mitchell, Intramural
director."
Elmer D. Mitchell said, "Cross-coun-
try is a fine sport. Americans have
neglected It because of the lack of
the game elementthat is to be found
in football, basketball, baseball, and
in all team games. It has great ben-
efits in that it furnishes good outdoor
exercise and recreation for young
students, and increases bodily health."
Sullivan Emphasizes Training
Coach Sullivan of the boxing and
wrestling teams, who will train the
new cross-country tryouts as fast as
they appear, running with them every
day to point out mistakes in form
and breathing, emphasized the need
for training for any form of athletics.
"You can't run two or three miles
unless you're in condition, know how
to breathe, and so on, than you cai
box 10 rounds without training," said
Sullivan. "If a man wants to make
the cross-country team, he must train
-and train- hard!"
COMMITTEE APPOINTS
YARS1IYCHEER LEAERS
Following the Case game yesterday
the Varsity cheerleader squad for
this year was chosen by the cheer-
leader committee of the Student Conn-
cil. From the 15 tryouts on the field,
the following seven men were select-
ed: W. H. Frankhauser, '24L, E. L.
Newhall, '25, W. C. Lustfield, '25, J.
A. Bacon, '24, G. C. Beeman, '23, J-
J. Weadock, '25, and E. C. Maeder, '24.
A head cheerleader will be chosen
by the squad at a meeting to be heJd
sometime before the next 'game, and
not by the Student Council as has
been thought by some. The remain-
ing men of the squad will be equal
in rank, there being no assistant
cheerleaders as hertofore.
Despite the soggy weather, the
squad showed up well, and managed
to get some peppy yells from the
small crowd present. To judge of
yesterday, one or two men especially
gave promise of becoming as good, if
not better, than some of Michigan's
great cheerleaders of the past. A
gi-eat deal of cheerleader material was
present on the field, and the men
chosen are the best of a'good lot.
No definite decision has been reach-
ed as yet regarding the squad for next
year. It has been decided by the
committee, however, that the squad
head will be elected for next year a
the close of the current football sea-
son- Definite arrangements will be
announced later.
The cheerleader committee consists
of the following men: E. C. Haug,
'23E, G. F. Youngs, '24D, Harry Kip-
ke, '24, Stanley Muirhead, '24, and

Howard Liverance, '23.
Biologists Leave for Washington
Mrs. Helen T. Gaige, assistant to
the director of the Museum of Zool-
ogy, and Frederick, M. Gaige, are

Lord Curzon.
Lord '-rzon, British foreign
minister, ms been sent to Paris to
'get in direct touch With French
igovernment leaders regarding the
iTurkish crisis. He has been in.
Otructed to point out: to the French
government that "bigger issues are
at stake than Turkey."
BURTON'SANN UAL
REPORT PUBLISHED

carriers.

,,

1

Sermons that aim to drive the mat-
ter of religion closer home to the
student, according to their titles, and
speakers chosen from the faculty
to tell about their observations in,
foreign .lands, will be heard by the
church-goi~ng student population of
Ann Arbor today.'
"The Religidus Anarchy of Today"
will be the subject of the sermon at
the morning 'service at the Unitarian
church, which begins at 10:40 o'clock.
In the evening, Prof. Leroy Water-
man of the department of Semitics
will 'speak before the Young People's'
meeting on "The Message of the Old
Testament to the World of Today."
The meeting will begin at 6:30
o'clock.
"Tomorrow's Rewards"
The morning service of the First.
Methodist church will take place at
10:30 o'clock. The sermon will be on
"Tomorrow's Rewards." The follow-
ing musical program will be given:
Intermezzo (from L'Arlesienne)
(Georges Bizet); Anthem: "Benedic-
tus" (Gounod), the choir; Anthem, "I
Am' Alpha and Omega" (Stainer), the
choir; Tenor solo: "God' Be Merci-
ful" (Percippe), Mr. Wheeler. At the
evening service, which will begin at
7:30 o'clock, Mr. Ernest K. Coulter
of New York City will deliver the Wes-
leyan Guild lecture on "Citizens of
Tomorrow." The special musical
program for this service follows: Vio-
lin and organ: "To a Wild Rose"
(Macdowell); alto solo and chorus:
"And God Shall Wipe Away All
Tears" (from the Vision of St.
John) (Coombs), Miss Howe and
choir; soprano solo: "Ave Maria"
(Bach-Gounod), Mrs. Wheeler.
I-errick to Speak
"The Bible: an up-to-date classic"
will be the theme upon which the
Rev. H. A. Jump will speak at the
Congregational church morning serv-
ice at 10:30 o'clock. At the 50 min-
ute forum, 12 o'clock, Prof. H. B. Mer-
,rick will speak on "Some Phases of
Chinese Life."
Services in English will be held
at the Zion Lutheran church At 10:30
n'cnck. the shiect heine "The Un-

will also be conducted in English, at
10:30 o'clock. The topic of the ser-
mon will be: "Religion in Education."
A German service at 9:30 o'clock,
and a service in English at 11:30
o'clock will be held at St. Paul's
Lutheran church. The sermon sub-
ject here will be "The Christian Sab-
bath."
Sermon for Students
What is termed as "a sermon for
students" will be delivered at the
morning service at 10:30 o'clock at
the Church of Christ (Disciples). The
title of that sermon is "That Soul of
Yours." An evening service, at which
an address on,"In Opinion, Liberty"
will be delivered, is slated for 7:30
o'clock.
The First Baptist church will hold
services at 10:30 o'clock and 7:30
o'clock, at which sermons on "Dream-
ers and Cynics" and on "The Deceit-
fulness of Sin," respectively, will be
delivered.
Sunday class for men in the "Up-
per Room" of Lane hall will be held
from 9:30 to 10:15 o'clock. The First
Church of Christ, Scientist 'will have
its regular.Sunday morning service at
1:30 o'clock. Then subject for the
sermon will be: "Are Sin,- Disease,
and Death Real?"
"Procrastination"
Morning worship at the First Pres-
byterian church will take place at
10:30 o'clock. The theme of the ser-
mon will be: "Diana or Christ-the
Mistake of Dimetrius." At the Young,
People's meeting, 6:30 o'clock, the
discussion will center on "The Folly
of Procrastination-the Friendly En-
emy of the Student."
Morning prayer and a sermon on
"Elements of Faith" are scheduled for
10:30 o'clock at St. Andrew's Episco-
pal church. At 5 o'clock in the eve-
ning Mr. Charles T. Webb will speak
on "Stones of the Master Builder."
Prof. A. L. Cross of the history de-
partment will deliver an illustrated
lecture on "Lands and People of the
South Pacific," at the 6 o'clock sup-
per which is to take place at Harris
hall.
Announcement from the Trinity

UNSURE FOOTING
KEEPS SCORE
DOWN
CAS GiNSON PE
FIRST STRING PLAYERS REMAIN
IN GAME UNTIL LAST
QUARTER
Displaying a driving, crashing,
straight football attack that swept all
opposition before it, and a defense
that was impregnable to all but the
overhead offensive of the enemy, Mich-
igan's Varsity .football team over-
whelmed Case 48 to 0 in the opening
game of the season at Ferry field
yesterday.
Despite a rain that alternated be-
tween a driving flood and a. drizzle
all during the game nearly 8,000 peo-
ple stayed in their seats until the
final whistle blew. Footing on the
gridiron was poor due to the rain
which started Friday night and con-
tinued with little letup until game
time. It is hard to estimate how large
a count the Wolverine backs would
have run up on a dry field as the
Case tacklers seemed unable to solve
the style of any of the Wolverine ball

All Phases of University Activities
Included in President's First
Yearly Statement
IMPROVEMENTS, PROGRAM,
NEEDS, STATISTICS ISSUED
Outlining all phases of the Univer-
sity's activities for the college year
1921-1922, the first annual report of
President Marion L. Burton was is-
sued yesterday morning. The report
also includes data submitted by the
deans, directors, and departmental
superintendents.
The legislative program, adminis-
trative changes, educational improve-
ments and students' statistics are
among the subtitles appearing- in the
first section of the report. Under
"Our Needs" President Burton has
listed the buildings and equipment
which he considered most vital to the
needs of the expanding University.
The completion of the new hospital,
erection of a nurses' home, and a cen-
tral administration building ' are
among the topics discussed.
The purchase of land for building
sites is dwelt upon, and a summary
of the entire program for the future
is included.
As the "real issue" in running the
University, President Burton states,
that a background of research for
members of the faculty is most essen-
tial. Without "stimulating investiga-
tion the spirit of scholarship is weak
and faltering". This, he states, should
be linked with an ability to reckon
with the present as well.
In concluding President Burton ex-
presses his appreciation of the re-
lationships that existed between offi-.
cers and commends the sagacious ad-
ministration of University affairs by
the Board of Regents.
AGREEMENT 'EXPECTED
ON PRMNRUILDING
Indications now are that a definite
plan with regard to the building of
an apartment house at the southeast
corner of Hill street and Washtenaw
avenue will have been formulated and
announced by noon tomorrow.
The committee appointed by Mayor
George E. Lewis upon the recommen-
dation of the city council has nego-
tiated with "Barney" Wetzmnan,
builder, and has several propositions
under consideration.
May Change Location
The agreement between the citizens'
commititee and Mr. Wetzman which
will probably be consummated, ac-
cording to L. D. Carr, chairman of the
committee and former president of the'
Ann Arbor Real Estate board, calls

First Stringers Stay in
Contrar2y to the usual custom in the
opening game, the first string players
were kept in the line up until the last
quarter and even then .not as many
of the substitutes were seen as has
been the case in the past.
Scoring honors were taken "by
Doug Roby, veteran half back, who
added three touchdowns to the Mich-
igan total, closely pressed by Kipke
with two, Steger one, and Cappon
one. If it were possible to pick any
individual star in the Wolverine back-
field that 'individual would be Kipke.
The brilliant half back never showed
to better advantage than yesterday.
He was handicapped at times by the
slippery turf but in the great majority
of cases' in which he was given the
ball, rang up substantial gains. ,His
kicking was consistently good and his
defensive play stood out prominently.
Backs Sure Ganers
Roby ran the ends and crashed off
tackle with equal effectiveness, twist-
ing, stiff arming and dodging out of
pockets that seemed impossible from
the stands. The big back showbd that
he has improved on his broken field
work since last fall and his line drives
have evidently lost none of their ef-
fectiveness. Cappon, acting captain
in Goebel's absence, tore the oppos--
ing line to thin shreds with his ter-
rific plunging and was the surest
ground gainer in the Wolverine back-
field.
Advance notices were amply livet
up to in the case of Herbert Steger,
who has been generally hailed as the
greatest Ifalf back turned out of a
middle western high, school since
Walter Eckersall entered Chicago.
The sophomore star, sent into the
game at the beginning of the third
quarter for his first appearance on
Ferry field carried the ball but once,
but on that occasion turned left end
for 65 yards and a touchdown, slak-
ing off opposing tacklers like flies
and even clearing out of ,the way a
pair of teammates who had stopped
to watch his progress.
New Men Show Up
Dunleavy and Keefer were the oth-
er backs introduced for the first time
to a Michigan crowd and although
their debuts were not as auspicious
as Steger's they proved that they will
be valuable assets for Yost before the
season is over.-'
There was a noticeable steadiness
about the work of the Wolverine line
that was encouraging and sent the
crowd away with the feeling that there
is a chance for the forward wall upon
which Yost pas concentrated this fall.
Eddie Johns, just returned to the
squad from the ranks of the ineligibles
Thursday was started at guard and
his work stood out as it always has
during his previous two years on the
Varsity.
Several flaws stood out in the line
play that can be accounted for by
inexperience and which will be remed-
ied by Coaches Little and Weiman dur-
ing the next week. Perhaps the most

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