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October 07, 1922 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-07

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WIGAN LDAILY

ISECTIDNAL CONTESTS WiIL
FEAiTURE TODAY'S GRIDIRON CRD

__ .

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;1

I:'iliv(sity c "(eorgia InVidc s't
'i! 'Fr B et1e Wit
((Ciuro

Stagg}

'TIWEE WESTERN TEAMS HIT I
TA 1L FOR A'TLANTIC COAST
Opening encounters on the gridiron!
are, as a general rule, of little inter-
est to football fans outside the circle
of each playing institution's select co-
terie. It is not usual, until after the
games are played, that the average
outsidei' pays particular attention to
the various and sundry contests that
make up the schedule for opening day,
and then only if he finds some pecul-
iar interest in certain battles, or is
siurprise~d by some big. upset of a.
great university's eleven by some
small college of little repute.
FoII Intersectienals
However, there are -a few contests
scheduled for today in which there
lies some smattering of interest for
all. The intersectional idea is always
'n big attrayion in fooball. There are
four su'ch gridiron duels on today's
.menu, chief among which will un-
;(oubledly be that which takes place
at, Chicago when Coach Alonzo A.;
Stagg's Maroons clash with the Uni-
versity of Georgia.
versity of Georgia. The southerners
do not expect to win. That, neverthe-
less, is not to say that they will not i
give the Chicago eleven the toughest
kind of a battle.. Those who recall the
Michigan-Tulane game of 1921, or
whose memories .carry back as, far ate
the old Michigan-Vanderbilt contests
know well the fighting spirit of south-
ern men. In today's war of north andj
south a clean, hardfought contest
may be expected, with Chicago conced.-
ed the upper hand, by not too great a
margin.
Army vs. Kansas
East meets West on three fields to-
day. The feature game of the trio
will be staged by the Army and the.
University of Kansas on the former's
gridiron at West Point. It ip the
general concensus of opinion that l
Kansas hasn't the proverbial snow-
ball's chance to come out on the top,
of the heap. Still, those boys from
the southwest have an uncanny abil-
ity to spring surprises at times, and
a prophecy -on that game is one that
shouldhe undertaken with consider-
able hesitation.
Reserve Goes East
It is, however, a safe bet that the

Navy will have little or no difficulty
in disposing of, Western, Reserve, of
Cleveland, in the third of the inter-
sectional battles. Reserve, a strong
enough team for a small school, can.
hat dly hope to compete with the slash-
ing power of the big Navy eleven. The
game should not resolve itself into
any sort of a contest until the Annapo-
lis mentor has taken advantage of a
safe lead to insert his second and third
string men into the action.
Of the fourth section vs. section en-
counter little need or can be said.
Marietta (Ohio) college journeys to
Morgantown to play West Virginia. It
is hardly a rash guess to say that West
Virginia is expected' to win by a fair
majority.
While Michigan is battlingCase or,
Ferry field another big team will bi;
swinging into action some 40 mile.:
dist/ant, the University of Detroit pick-
ing on Duquesne (Pa.) college in De-
troit. The Red should win.
Big Temi Stroig
All of the Big Ten elevens are ex-,
pected to cop their. opening games' by
varying degrees of superiority. Oho
State, suddenly weakened by the 'in-
eligibility, of Noel Workman, backfield
man extraordinary, may Have a difili-
cult time with Ohio Wesleyan's veter-
an and powerful team, but the super-
iority of the state university is evi-
dent enough to predict a victory by a
fairly safe margin.
The only other Copference games
that promise close battles are the Be-
loft-Northwestern and the Purdue-
Milliken contests. Both Big Ten
teams should win, but only after vi-
cious struggles. Beloit and the Pur-
ple are both weakened by injuries.
Were the men from the smaller Wis-
consin school all in good shape the
out come would be decidedly doubt-
ful, as Beloit upset the Enstontians
last year. This year, hover, the
even balance of injuries ..will make
Northwestern reignl faverite as the
opening whistle blows.
Holy Cross vs. Harvard and Virginia
STUDENT MASONS ALL OUT MA-
SONIC TEMPLE 7:30 TONIGHT. Adv.
REAL PEN SERVICE
RIDER'S PEN 1 OP
PEN SPECI4!STS
308 So. State ,tv

/92 6 2Zcb V 57JON
V/kVRS/7/
-- I
I a
Vs'. Prinseton offer about the only
strictly eastern games that may be
at a1 worth watching. Both Crim-
scrn and Tiger should win, but with
scme trouble. On the Pacific Coast
it will be interesting to note how
large a score the University of Cali-
fornia can run up on Redlands.
Martha Washington Candies. Fresh
every Friday. Tice's Drug Store. 117
S. Main.- Adv.
PACKAGE and bagage express.
2939-M.-Adv..
STUDENT MASONS ALL OUT MA-
SONIC TEMPLE 7:30 TONIGHT. Adv.

CASE

R.HT.
Clinthorne
IR.T.
Farren

CASE
Gribben
F.B.
Campbell
R. G. C.
Boehm McAfee

VS. MICHIGAN

Linni
L.T.
Smith

"a' SecretarY To Be m4 of Honor
Mliss MAarguierite Stuart of thie Na-
tional Y.W.C.A. is the guest of honor
at a luncheon given in her honor to-
day by the university cabinet of the
°'Y". Mis Stuart is the traveling sec-
retary for the Central Regent whose
headquarters are at Chicago.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

I R. E.
Blyns

L. G.
Brill

Kirk
L. E.

Muirhead
L.T.
Roby
L.H.

Rosatti
L.G.

MICHIGAN
Blo tt
C.
Cappon
F.B.

L.E.
Alden
Neisch
R .E.

Pen Repairii
RIDER'S PEN SHOP
308 Se State St.
21-HOUR SERVICE - FAIR PR
STUDENT MASONS ALL OUT
SONIC TEMPLE 7:30 TONIGHT.

Steele VanderVort
R.G. R.T.
Kiipke
R.H.

Knode
Q.

Ytl
III?"
dml
Epll,
Sll.t
Will
iml
dull)
ml
am$
NII

STEAM FITTING

PELIC HEALTH EDUCATION
COMMITTEE TO MEET HERE
Members of the joint committee on
Public Health Education, will hold a
meeting here on, October 9. The ar-
rangement of the" bulletin and pro-
gram for the coming year is the
scheduled business of the meeting.
The joint commnission is made up
of University officials, and members
of the medical and dental profession

of the state, its purpose being the
dissemination of information con-
ductive to public health. The work
is carried on largely by extension lec-
ture courses in towns throughout the
state.
Specially prepared ooa served at
the Chinese Gardens, 106 S. Main st.
-Ady-
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

215 E. HURON

PHONE 214-F1

Our mills are electrically driven, the cleanest of powers-every-
thing is done to provide pure wholesome foods. O4r line includes
the old household favorite, good for all purposes
THE ROLLER KING BRAND
and-
MIMICO BREAKFAST FOOD
MIMICO BREAD FLOUR
MIMICO PASTRY FLOUR,
MIMICO GRANULATED ,MEAL
MIMICO PANCAKE FLOUR
MIMICO GRAHAM FLOUR
and everything in the way of flour and mill feeds coming from a
well equipped plant.

IF YOU WEAR
GOOD SHOES

lff--

'Where 1D OWe CO
...Front-4Here, Boys? U
~ where-yer 3y011go, You "iil
be better 1off mentally n
* physically after a gamne Of U
* Pocket Or Carom.i Billiards.
I -
c.
Ifl.3LrAUDS C10AIRS CANFl~B
PIPES LUNC4ES SODAS
S"we try to treat you ri h't S

You Wil.nloy.

ASK FOR OURGOODS AT GROCER

MICHIGAN MILLING COMPANY

"FOOTWEAR.'f QUALITY
and DISTINCTION"

COLUMN
CLOSES
AT3 P.M. ADVERTISING.

*I

i
COLUIMN
CLOSES
AT 3 P.M

3llfred J. i&ix6g. n .

MICIRIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per word a day, paid in advance. Min-
imuni charge for first day, 25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. Three
cents per word per day if charged. White space 'charged for at rate
of 5c per agate Jine. Classified, charged only to those having phones.
Liner Rates:aTwelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advance.
PHONE 960

DE TROIT

ANN ARBOR

CHICAGO

.h .. ... ........

/ 'a

WHITNEY THEATRE, SAT. OCT. 7
$1.00, $1.50, $00 - MAIL NOW

0

aAVRamM Mna20
Eli

t'

1

--- ---- --

CHORAL

U ON

co

E RTS

FOA.SALE'
FOR SALE-Wurlitzer "Lyric" trum-
pet with case. $19.50. In good con-
dition. T. C. Schneirla, 618 PA'ck-
ard, 2378-R.. 12-1
FOR SALE-Airedale -puppiestwith
the combined blood-lines of two o~f
the world's greatest dogs. 711
Fountain St. 12-3
FOR SALE-RADIO SET. Wound
specially for Detroit broadcasting.
Neatly encased. Phone 1937-M.
11-3
FOR SALE-Cheap 1918 Ford Tour-
ing Car. New tires. Good condition.
Call 67. Ask for Millar. 12-1
FOR SALE-A chafing dish, practic-
ally new. Call at 603 Ann st.
Phone 1482-M. 11-2
FOR SALE-Restaurant. Going con-
c ern. $1100 starts you right. Phone
1798-W. 11-3
FOR SALE-Ford Speedster. Good
Tires. Fine. Shape. $95.00. Daniels
1808-M. 12-2
FOR SALE-A sequin formal dress.
New, size 36. Half price. Call 1209-M
after 6. 11-3
FOR SALE--Sweet Cider. Bring your
jug. Chas. Klager, 617 S. Main St.

LOST
LOST-Calculus and notebook. -
ward. S. R. Lee. . 114 N. Ingall
11
LOST-Wardrobe trunk, green. Initia
T. P. Gr. Call 1300. 0
FOUND '
IPOUND-Purse containing ring. Ca
at 432 Maynard St. 12.
WANTE'
WANTED-Young healthy me
weighing about 150 lbs. -at Unive:
shty Hospital for blood doners. Se
Dr. Morrill. 11>
WANTED - Room-mate. Wonderfa
suite across from Engineering Arc:
.1103 So. University. 12-
WANTED-To rent cabin along Hur
'on river for school year or les
Box E.F.G. Daily. 11-
WANTED-A typewriter in good con
dition, cheap. Call 1883-M at urea
time. 11-;
WANTED-Piano player for exce
lent board job. Call Lottin 2580-lM
WANTED-Roommate by Freshma
Engineer. Phone 986-R. $2.50. 12-

rAUM

Hill Auditorium-

: Ann Arbor

PATRICK PRODUCTS
are well known to you all fpr,
their long wearin , ualities
as well as the snap_ to their,
models.

E

-w

RUSS IAN i
OCTOBER 24-MISCHA ELMAN VIOLINIST
In spite of the many wonderful violinists which have won :distinction during
recent years, Elman -still retains his position as a, leader of them all. He is a stupen-
dous artist who always pleases.
NOVEMBER o-MARY GARDEN a n d S I N C E RA
America's best known opera singer will make her Ann Arbor 'debut. She will
be assisted by Gutia Casini, 'Cellist, and Isaac VanGrove(Pianist.
-WORLD'S GR E ATEST
JANUARY 8-PADEREWSKI P I A N I S T
Poland's statesman who after a recess of several years will resume his artistic
career. He has said "Hill Auditorium is the finest hall in the world," and he ought
to -know.
JANUARY- 24-THE OPERA "IMPRESARIO" (MOZART).
Percy Hemus with an all-American cast, directed by William' Wade Hinshaw,
will present this attractive musical opera. Elaborate stage hangings and costumes will
add to the musical offerings._
FEBRUARY 13-UKRAINIAN NATIONAL CHORUS
Alexander Koshetz, Director; Oda Slobodskaja, Prima Donna of the Petrograd
Opera, and Nina Koshetz, Primna Donna of the Moscow Opera, soloists; 40 singers in
costume who will appear in choral and operatic roles.
MARCH 9-GUY MAIER AND, LEE PATTISON
These famous American artists have won a unique position in the musical
world as exponents of two piano recitals. Their attractive programs have made a
deep impression tn New York, Boston and other music centers.
COURSE TICKETS may be ordered by mail - $4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.00
(Patrons Tickets, first choice up to October 7, $7.00). Orders filed in order of receipt.
Concerts begin at 8 o'clock Eastern Standard time. Interurban cars leave auditorium after
all concerts. i l .

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-ANY STUDENT, NOT
YET PERMANENTLY LOCATED,
WHO IS INTERESTED IN A REA-
SONABLY PRICED SINGLE ROOM
TWO BLOCKS FROM THE CAM-
PUS MAY CALL 1780-R AND ASK

WANTED-Students washing.
2873-I.

P

FOR SALE-Rudd Automatic Heater. WANTED-Pair men's riding b
$50.00. Phone Booth 2606. 6-21 Address R. T. H. Daily.

FOR MR. RICE.

12-2

FOR RENT-Exceptionally large east
room for two or three men. Could
arrange adjoining room for, sleep-
ing. Party may do own room work
and reduce rent if desired. Phone
1194M. 422 E. Washyngton. 11-3
FOR RENT-Six room furnished
apartment, 2 blocks east of campus.
Phone 802-J. 10-3
FOR REND--Room near Ferry Field.
724 Dewey Ave. Phone 1272-W. 12-2
LOST

FOR RENT-Piano. Apply Foste
House of Art. 1
MISOELLANEOUS
FURNITURE-Double study tal
chiffonier, sanitary cot and m
tress, single white iron bed a
mattress, three straight chairs, h
matting, clothes ,bars, winged chz
reed rocker, gate legged table, b
ding bhest, white en~ameled sin,
wooden bed, white wash stand,
Elsifor's Storage Co. 117 No. Fi
St.1
A HUSTLER-Handling our nati
ally advertised necessity lcan
himself thru school. Commission
advance. Phone 1855 Saturday
twepn 12:00 and 1:30 for appqi
ment. Mr. Jones. 1
SEIBERT'S DINING , ROOMS-I
East Liberty. _ meals, $6.00.
meals $5.00. Including Sunday T
ening Meal. 1
E, NORMANTON BILBIE, teacher
-violin, piano, and1 harmony. Stud
307 N. Main St. Tel..611-M. 1
WILL SHARE-Or Rent beautifu
furisv chtQA nv 'rhomy 42A9 nn

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE ARRIVAL OF THE 1922 MODELS
-- --- FOR YOUR APPROVAL -- -

LOST-White and Brown, screw-tail-
ed, female Boston Bull terrior. An-
swers to the nane "Peggy." Re-
ward. Return to 1101 Church, 977-J.

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