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October 07, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-07

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1F THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board inf
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
'lichigant, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May.
nard Street.
Phones Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, 96. .
Communications not to exceed o00rwords
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
anid notices of events will be published in
The Daily at the discretion of the Editor; if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No manuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed, in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-M
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
City Editor .James B. Young
Assistant City tditor...-......arion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman......E. R. Meiss
Night Editors
Ralph Byers Ba'rry Hoey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. J. E. Mack
L. J. Hersh:dor.r R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports 'Editor:..............F. H. McPike
Sunday Magazine E~ditor ......Delbert Clark
Wome's Uditor. ......Marion Koch,
Humor Editor ..............Donald Coney
Conference Editor............H. B. Grundy
Pictorial Editor ..............Robert Tarr
Music Editor. .................H. Ailes'
Assistants

CLASS NOMINATION QUORUMS
When the Student council voted in-
valid the list of nominees of certain
class organizations at the reecnt
elections, such action, unfortunate
though it was,' was deemed necessary
because of the fact that in a number
of cases the rejected classes had an
insufficient' representation. Class
meetings, especially when officers for
the year are to be elected, are highly
important to the welfare and success
of class activity, a fact which too
many students failed to appreciate
When they made their absence so,
keenly felt at the recent assemblies..
Be that as it may, however, the
Student council should formulate
some definite, specific ruling govern-
ing situations of this character, in-
:stead of leaving the matter to the
discretion of a council committee to
determine whether or not a sufficient
number of a certain class was pres-
ent to make the election valid. ,The"
campus must have for its own in-
formation and guidance some stand-
ard by which to govern itself in other
instances of similar significance.
It would not be inadvisable, there-
fore, to suggest that the Student
council adopt some regulation stipu-
lating that at least a fifty per cent'
quorum of the total membership of a
class be present at a meeting or ele-
tion, to make the results of that as-
sembly legal. Such an act would be
doubly beneficial, for it would serve
io impress upon the class members
the importance of turning out for im-
portant class meetings, as well as to
act as a quorum ruling which would
undoubtedly make unnecessary any
repetition of the events of the past
week.

OASED ROLL
HOW DID YOU AL-
IBI THAT SUM.
MER GIRL
TRAILING FASHIONS SCOEIED
BY IIECATO3IB OF HAND-
SOME HOMBRES

t

6

M. I. Pryor
Dorothy Benetts
Maurice Beinman
K. A. Jliliungton
MV. B. Butler
11. C. C lark
A.1B. Connable
Evelyn J. Coughlin
Eugere Car ichael
Bernadette Cote
Wallace F. Elliett
T.ae. Fiske
;Maxwell Fead

john Garlinahouse
Iabel Fishets
Winopa A. Hibbard
Samuel NMoore
T. G. McShane
W. B. Rafferty
W. I. Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
P. MT. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franklin Dickman
Joseph psteit
3. W. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
;USINESS MANAGER
ALBERT'J. PARKER
Adverti'sin~g........John 3. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising .:... ...Edward F. Conlin
Advertising. ... .Walter K. Scherer
Accounts ..........Laurence 11. Favrot
Circulation....... ..David J. M. Park
Publication ..... ...L. Beaumont Parks
Assistants

Townsend H. Wolfe
Kenneth Seickd
George Rockwood
Perry Al.. IHayden
Eugene 1,. Dunne
W". (;railich, Jr.
John C.,Ilaskin,
Harvey LI Reed,
C. L. Putnam
E. I). Armantrout
H. V. .Cooper
Wallace Fower
rdw 13, iedle
Harold V 11Halo

Alfred M. White
Win. D. Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. Dryer
Wmn . ,Good.
Clyde L. Hagerman,
A. Hiartwell, jr.
J. Bluimenthal
Howard Hayden
W. K. Kidder
Henry Freud
" lU er 1 '. Bostwick
L. Piere

BEGINNING SAFETY AT HOME
rWith the present safety talk andl
A B C campaign, attention might well
be 'called to the deep ruts at unex-
pected places in the pavements of
many of our main thoroughgares. The
uninitiated driver, directing his car
along"the smooth surface of a macad-
amised street, finds without any red-
lantern warning whatever the front
cnd. of his vj3hicle dropping away
from under him, the front wheels
landing with no uncertain emphasis
against the oposite bank of an unno-
ticed ditch; needless to say, the rear
wheels repeat the performance short-
ly afterwards.
Momentarily upset by his racking
experience, the motorist often finls, it
difficult to keep the car's general di-
rection away from the curb until he
can gain his own and the car's equi-
librium. It rather seems that .while.
Ann Arbor .is about this matter of
making motoring safe for both mo-
torist and pedestrian something might,
be done towards remoaing these
footfalls that warily lie in wait of
the car-driver, concealed beneath the
shinng level of an otherwise perfect-
ly good pavement.,
This condition might easily be rem-
edied if those who find it imperative
to dig a ditch across a street would'
only remember that new dirt settles,
and would return after a; lapse of
time and finish their jobs.

Back to the scant skirts of yester-
year! is the cry of the male con-
tingent on the campus. Let the1
shears of Fashion snip and snip
again!
That is the verdict of a Hecatomb1
(or thereabouts) of Handsome Hom-
bres interviewed by the rolls-report-
er on State street between 12 and
12:30 p. m. (Greenwich). Their sev-
eral opinions are presented below-
just try to guess whom they are!
Robert, '24-My father is out of
work because of longer skirts. He isI
a hosiery manufacturer.{
James, '23-As an insurance actu-
ary my father says that there is less;
mortality! among casual observers
than there was last year.
Melancholy, '23-Life has lost its
interest.
Horace, 53-I have a cataract oil
one ye, anyway.
"OH, DETH-"
Young Archibald, the frosh Apollo!
When he walks the Diag, the co-eds
follow.
Many the glances of freshettes fair,
When Archie deigns to take the air.
But Archibald, unhappy wight,
This day hath plunged in such a
plight,
A thousand years will not set right:
At 8 o'clock, or nearly so,
As Campus time is prone to go,
Young Archie, with unstudious haste,
His laggard footsteps classward
chased.
The clack had struck, but he was
near,
When, hist! he stopped in full car-
reer!
What Destiny with luckless Zeal
Had put a Spoke in Archie's Wheel?
His wild eyes started from their
sockets,
His hands dug deep in all his pock-
ets,
He madly clutched his throbbing
breast,
His pot heaved up upon his crest,
He searched the walk,
He searched the ground,
He searched his pockets through and
through,
His look despairing sought the clock,
The quarter struck: IT was not
found.
By swifter leaps his panic grew.
A tremor shakes his slender frame.
Say, doth he breathe his mother's
name?
A frenzied sneeze,
A frantic sniff:
He had forgot his handkerchief.
NUFF-SED.

EDITORIAL COMMENT
HANDICAP OR ASSETT
(Iowa State Student)
Of the everplentiful supply of ad-
vice that is dumped at the door of the
freshman every fall but few things
are more worth remembering from
the conglomerate mass than the fact
that some time should be devoted to
study.
While this would have been taken
for granted"once, several pieces of
propaganda have made it a doubted
fact in the minds of a good many
college students and others alike. A
common fallacy heard everywhere is
to the effect that high scholarship
dooms a student. to the oblivion of
impracticability and general useless-
ness after leaving college.
j There are extremists on both sides
of the question. Some decry every-
thing that takes any time from pour-
ing over books while there are as
many others who want college "life"
only.
The Student believes e3ry man
and woman in college should engage
in activities outside of the classroom.
Nobody has much respect for a book
worm and he hasn't much coming.
Activities develop a student in ways
that are as"essential as knowledge
gained from looks.
There is altogether too much un-
founded belief, however, that schol-
arship is a relatively unimportant or
even harmful commodity. So-called
hard headed business men as well as
some students discount a high grade
average and the man that holds it.
In 1911 Dr. Paul VanDyke collect-
ed some facts that prove that rather
than marking a man for failure, high
scholarship increases his chances at
success in the ratio of 20 to 1 over the
average student. Dr. VanDyke made
a careful study of the scholarship
records and future history of nearly
9,000 graduates of five famous insti-
tutions to see how many of them had
attained such prominence as to be;
placed in Who's Who. t
Studying thirteen succiessive sen-
ior classes from Harvard, number-
ing 2;229 men, 75 won the very high-
est scholarship honors. Fity-nine of
the 75 are living and of these 59, 27
were listed in Who's Who, or about

GRAHAMS'

MICHIGAN

BOTH STORES

Just a few more pop-corn stands
and State street will rival, the best
street carnival.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson

h.

TIME TABLE

(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:oc
an., 7:oo a.m., 8:oo am., 9:os a.m. and
hourly to 9 :o5 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to,9:47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bound-7 :oo a.m. and ev-
ery two hours to 9:oo, p.m., iir:oo p.m. To
Ypsilanti only-x :40 P.m., s5 a.m,
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a.n., 2:10
P. M.j
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47, 4:47 pm.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
p.m.

You Never
Can Tell!--
May pour any minute;
any. day is likely to be
cilly and wiudy.; of
coursb there'll be a few
wn rm, sunny ones.
What's better than a
coat that's rain and
wind proof without be-
ing heavy-a coat that
you can hang on your
arm, or throw into a
bag without hurting it?
Could any coat e han-
dier these variable Fall
days

i
41'
6 i t'.
dI

I,

I

.3a

i

GABARDINES - WHIPCORDS - TWEEDS, ET.
$27.5,0 upt

a

1922
S
1
8
15
22
29

M
2
9
13
23
so

OCTOBER
T W T
3 4. 5
10 11 12
17 1S 19
24 25 26
31,

F
6
13
20-
27

1922
S
14
21
28

FRESH CAPS--65c

-TOQUES-0c

LINDENSCHMiTT-APFEL CO.

I

SONG

BOOK

SATURDAY, OdTOBER 7, 1922
Night Editor-HOWARD A. DONAHUE,
TO SAFEGUARD EXPANSION
That Ann Arbor is in need of a ho-'
tel such as is being at the present
time contemplated can admit of lit-
tle or no argument. But, unfortu-
nately, the company intending to un-
dertake this project is negotiating
for a piece of property at the corner
of Jeffel-soni aid State streets, a loca-
tion which for a number of reasons
will in the cours.e of time prove im-
practical.
The main obstacle is the fact that
the property is directly opposite the
University 'campus, and in a posi-
tion which is already bordered by
University buildings. It is true that
the present building program does
not call ffOtthe use of this territory.
But while the needs of the Univer-
sity ten years hence cannot be fore-
seen, the past has proved that when
enrollment has increa ed and new
departments are added or old ones
expinded , t-h w building accommoda-
tions must be furnished. To be more'
definite, although no specific plans
have been formulated in this regard,
a business administrationtbuilding, a
new museum, and gymnasium have
already been discussed.
Under such circumstances it would
seem expedient that the University
have under its control all property
within so short. a radius for purposes
of expansion. Within the past year
thirty-five residences have been mov-
ed from the eastern vicinity of the
campus.. Is it not probable that with
the Michigan Unio'n and dormitories
there already the next expansion will
be to the west?
If the hotel company really desires
to establish a permanent structure in
Ann Arbor it will be to its advantage
to seek a place which will prove less
liable to interfere with the Univer-
sity's expansion. No doubt other sites
of equal advantage and greater desir-
ability might be found. On the other
hand, it would be to the benefit of the
University to have no commercial

one in two.
At Yale 20 senior classes numbered
2,132, with 102 .first honor men, of
whom the 80 living in 1911 furnished
31 to Who's Who.
Princeton seniors for 20 years in-
cluded 100 honor men and of the 76
living 29 were chosen. Of those who
had attained high scholarship at Am-
herst college and at Brown univer-
sity, aproximately 25 and 33 per cent,
respectively, of those living , were
named in Who's Who.
Summarizing, Dr. VanDyke found
that of the. 4 per cent. that had dis-
tinguished themselves by scholarship
one of every two andtwo-thirds of
the number were included in the book,
the 79 were too young to have had
a fair chance to distinguish them-
selves.
The freshman has a new job in
store, that is dividing his time right-
ly. Those who fail to remember that!
first of all they are here to learn
something go home before long while
those who ptt all their attention on
boks also ihake a serious mistake.
The thing to remember is that school
work is still the primary thing, though
after he or she is able every man and
woman can well afford to engage in
some worth-while activity.

Start Right With a Good Hat?
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned inside out
with all new trimmings are like new.r
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STOREr
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.T.R. Stops at State Street)
FOR PENS AND GOOD REPAIRING
RIDER
THE PEN SPECIALIST
308 So. State St.
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Time
X'D S
8:45 A.M.
4:40 P.M. 12:45 P.M. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D-Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLIOTT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-M

F
THE 0. & H. SHOE
FOR MEN

LAST EDITION OF

I

III

ANN ARBOR'S LEADING CLOTHIERS
"Exclusive, but not Expensive"
DOWNTOWN

I

:w: AT' :-:

I 1

1 11

I

$7.50 TO $9.00
The Branigan-a smart oxford in black or brown ,grain calfskin.
Its perfectly plain broad toe and heavy sole is assurance of real
comfort and prolonged., service. Prices on 0. & H. oxfords are ex-
tremely moderate considering their high standard of quality.
OKa &THertler
For, FOOTWEAR For

Men

Women

LAWY
There seems to be an increasing
tendency on the part of men who con-
template entering the business world,
or entering a variety of pursuits oth-
er than the legal profession to choose
the Law school for their training..
Many men enter the Law school
with no intention of practicing law
after reeciving their degree. Many
men who have been in business en-
ter the Law school and later re-enter
business. The Law school offers
them a type of training which 'they
feel of distinct adavantage in prac-
tically all lines of commercial pur-
suit. They feel that besides giving
them the mental stimulation that a
college education should give, it gives
them in addition something tangible,
which will be of directspractical ad-
vantage in the business world. If
this feeling continues it is likely that
a vast number of our future cap-
tains of industry will bear an L.L.B.
after their names.
COACHING
The fame and popularity of the
courses in coaching offered at the
University last summer marks a note-
worthy step in the development of'
athletics. In the early history of
such sports as football, victory de-
pended largely upon muscle and
trickery. Now it is conceded that a
team thoroughly acquainted with the
science of the game can account for
itself against the best opposition. In
sports of today, headwork is a dom-
inant factor, and while brains cannot
smtpplant agility and athletic skill,
they are necessary to direct that skill
to advantage.
In these modern times when a
team is victorious there is no end of
credit given the coach. And in pra-
tically all instances the credit is well
.I . it+hs + P +.ndono foP-

335 S. MAIN ST.
Have Your Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

A GUY I knew
Now plays a harp-
He cut his throat
With an Eversharp.

R

ur'ch.

Why do nobody but the best-lookingl
ones go into beauty parlors? Huh?
He's So Dumb He Thinks:
That ocean currents make electricity.
That a salt-cellar is a traveling sales-
man.
That the "Diet of Worms" is for fish.

I ,. '
i ,,"
3 A+
t
p
.
h
}+
" ,7r

1 1 ____

11

I HATE:'
Frosh in knickers. People
who read .over my shoulder.
Toasted rolls (from the restau-
rant) * The reservetsystem in
the Library. Lumps in mashed
potatoes "Daily" editorials Edge-
worth. A-one salesmen. Blonde
bobbed hair. Blondes anyway.
Three o'clocks. Women who be-
lieve you. Women who don't.
Over-sweet coffee. The history
department. Long skirts. Golf
shoes. Emerson! Spelling. Land-
ladies. Beer.** Barbers. Men
who let their wives d'rive the
car. Movie magazines. Optimism.
F. Roosevelt. People who say
"ladies" when they mean "wom-
en." Jazz. Pictures from the
"Dial.'*** An uninteresting liar.
The Satevepost. Overlands.
CUCU.
Rolls speaking:
* Thanks.C
** Are you sure?
*** Also from the "Liberator" and
"Zhar-ptitsa."
Saturday, isn't it?
Time does fly.

THE PIPE PIKERS
(The Daily Iowan)
Registration week is open season for
the "pipe course" hunters-the stu-
dents who come to the university to
get a degree rather than an education
or at least to make a feeble attempt
!o get a degree It is chiefly because
of thesesparasitestthat shigher ed u-
cation has comne into disfavor amongk
a certain class of people who come
incontact with them in later life.
Sepnding one's time and money in
a course because it is easy is about as
reasonable as taking a double dose
of medicine because it is cheap. When
students learn that they are here for
their own good; that what they learn
is for their own advancement; and
that a degree is merely a "scrap of
paper," then education will come into:
its own.
At the same time, on the other side
of the fence, some professors are wor-
rying over' all kinds of expedients toI
keep their course from being dubbed
"pipes." This often leads. them to
assign a great deal of work from
which the student receives little val-
tue. Professors should give only such
work as they honestly thought worth
the time spent in mastering it-in-
dependent of'the fact that some stu-
dents might be slipping along with
little effort on their part. For in the
end the student pays for his lack of
industry, not the nofessor

I

The best in town Permanent Groups

1 +HOi

Et
ZIERER WATKINS BORCHTERS
ARNOLD CORtBETT JIAIILL
CHON VAUPRE WANAMAKER
CLANCY

hIONEYCHICSLI
ROXBURGii
EGELER k
JUSTER
BRUCE

BENNETT,
DARLING
VAUPRE
CLAN CY
SWEET

CHAPEL
JAVIS
STILES
GREEN
RANSOM

LITTLETON
CURTIS
WESTON
BECKTON °
FREYBLTRG

NISSLE
BOXER
MILLER
AKIN
NIEDZIELSKI

11

Our Orchestras are Now Arranged.
Secure Your Music Early if You Want

THE

BEST

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