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October 07, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Sir ian

E aitj

T Y FRCROSS COU UA

TODAY

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VOL. XXXIII No. 12

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1922

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE

PRICE FIVE

SCOTTS PITCHING
GIVES TWO SAME
LEAD TO GIANTS,

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ENGLISH PLAY TO N
BE PRESENTE~D SOON~

GREEKS' DEFIANCE PLACES ALLIES
INDIFFICULT POSITION AT MEET

,.

NEWARK STUDENTS
TO MEET TONIGHT;

HALF DOZEN HITS GET TO OUT.
FIELD WHILE INFIELD TAKES
CARE OF TWENTY-FOUR"

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YANKEES GET MAN TO
FIRST ONLY SIX TIMES

Hoyt, Last Year's Wonder Falls
Fool Nationals' Star
Sluggers

to

(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 6. - Jack Scott's
name is now in the baseball hall of.
fame. His pitching, which won yes-
terday's game for the Giants, was so
marvelous that the Giant outfielders
made only six putouts, that the Yan-
kees were so thoroughly subdued that
18 of their 24 outs were of the easy
infield variety. Only four hits were
made by the Yankees, with their
touted "murder row" and only six,
-4sai uo ueu I 02 Aeg4 pp seuir84
First Inning
Yankees: Scott took Witt's bunt
and threw him out at first Dugan hit
a high fly to Young Frisch tossed out
Ruth .at first. No runs, no hits, no
errors.
Giants: Hoyt took Bancroft's bunt
and beat him to the bag. :Groh singled
into right field. Frisch singled over
second, Groh going to the middle bag.
Meusel lined out to Ward, who dou-
bled Frisch at first with a quick throw
to Pipp. No runs, two hits, no errors.
Second Inning I
Yankees: Pipp singled sharply in-
to right field. Meusel fouled to Kel-
ly. Schang flied out to Cunningham.
Pipp stole second. Bancroft threw
out Ward .at, first. No runs, one hit,
no errors..
Giants: Young lifted a high fly iA-
to left field for a single and when
he tried to stretch it was out, Meusel
to Ward. Scott. threw out Kelly at
rst. Cunningham got a single into,

3
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{

William A. Brady will present "The
Skin Game" at the Whitney theatre
Monday, with an all English cast
brought to this country by Basil Dean
and 'approved by Galsworthy him-
self, who has attended all the rehear-
sal .
The piece was given in New York
last year, exactly as produced in Lon
:don by Basil Dean, and proved, to be
one of the most forceful and interest-
ing of the serious plays in many sea-
son.
Reandean Ltd., in a letter from
London to William A. Brady have
written "This company is now re-
hearsing. Mr. John Galsworthy is at-
tending, and expresses his approba-
tion of the company in highest terms.
He says the performance will be as
good as those given in New York last
year, and suggests that the company
will not need strengthening for the
proposed Chicago engagement."

r GRPPQ OLI , SA P TV S
A-kO c -wy A- INVADING CHIALTALJA
21 '1~MA~4
Cs u - , " " M " " N U R L x u4I !
"I' rr" " .::'., . 4CLJN," "; O ,rte;^) ra
S'ONI/<

Members of The Greater Newark
club of New Jersey will hold their
first meeting of the year in room 302
of the Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight.
It is especially urged that all new
students from Newark or other New
Jersey towns other than Bayonne be
present at this meeting, as the main
business will be concerned with re-
oragnization plans. Election of offi-
cers for the present University year
will be held and several important
amendments to the constitution will
be considered. Plans will also be for-
mulated for the direction of the club's
policies.
New students desiring further in-
formation concerning The Greater
Newark club are asked to call H. G.
Kettenring, '23E, president, 1936-M, or
Leo J. Hershdorfer, 23, secretary at
1324-J before tonight's meeting.

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FIRST GItTL
TECHNICAL SCHOOL TEAM WILL
MAKE TWENTY-SIXTH AP-
PEARANCE HERE
GAME WILL SHOW EFFECT
OFSTRENUOUS CAMPAIGN
Kipke, Roby, Cappon and Knode Will
Start in Backfield; New Men
Will Slow Merits

BOARD VOTE:S, NEW
UNIFORMS TO SANDI

.

'The threat of the Greeks, as the Mudania conference meets, to resist to the last man any effort to return
eastern Thrace to Turkey may place the allies in a 'difficult position, close observers of the near east situation
agree. The allied representatives have promised Kemal Pasha to restore that part of Thrace to the Turks.
The map above shows the new main points of interest.

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Purchase of New Regalia Assured
by Joint Action of Athletic
Board and Regents

EXTEND TICKET PRIVILEGE
TO ALL FACULTY FAMIIIES

The purchase of new uniforms for
the band this year was assured last
night when the Board of .Control of
Athletics at its first meeting held in
the .Union, voted to grant the $1,500

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ed out to Young
pper and threv
Led. Witt wa,

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necessary to make the purchase pos-
sible.
It had been thought by those in
charge of the band that it might be
necessary to abandon the expansion
program' of the organization this 'year
due to an insufficient number of uni-
forms. However, the amount voted by
the Board last night together with the
$1,500 granted for the same purpose
by the Board of Regents at a recent
meeting will enable the band to in-
crease from 45 to 75 members.
The Board also voted toextend the
sanme privileges of buying season tick-
ets to the dependent members of the
families of faculty and students that
has been accorded to faculty members
and their wives in the past. The' new
ruling will enable members of the
University to buy tickets for their
children as well as their wives.

caught off first, Smith to Kelly. The
crowd gave Witt the laugh. No runs,
no hits, no errors.
Giants: Scott singeld over, second.
Ward booted Bancroft's grounder and
the ball rolled into the left field, Scott
going to third, loyt took Groh's
grounder and Scott was run down,
Hoyt to Dugan. Bancroft went 'to
third and Groh to second on the play.
Bancroft scored on Frisch's sacri-
fice fly toWitt, Groh going to third.
Groh scored on Meusel's liner to right
for one base. Young forced Meusel,
Ward to Scott. Two runs, two hits,
one error.

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The Fiddle Or The
Slide Rule-Which?I
"Shall I be a violin artist or an en-
gineer?" was the question that con-
fronted Rex Moule, '26E, during the
past summer. Moule has studied the
FRENCII AND ITALIANS SEEM TO violin since he was six years of age,
BE SUPPORTING being a graduate of May Leggett-
* EMAL Abel of Detroit. Last summer he real-
led a life-long ambition when he be-
PROPOSAL FOR ALLIED came the pupil of Leopold Auerof of
CONTROL IS REJECTED New York, considered one of the
world's greatest teachers of violin.
emand. That Britain State Position The interest of the youthful violin-
Expiratlon 'of Time Limit ist in music, was no greater than
This Evening his liking for machinery and being
desirous of a college education de-
London, Oct. 2.-Dispatches reach- cided to earn his spurs in the field
ing here tonight give even a graver of engineering as well as music, and
jugher toigh gie een grverentered the 'Colleges of Engineering
aspect to the Near Eastern situation and Architecture here this fall.
than that of earlier in the day. The Moule is 19years of age, and has
Kemalists are insisting on the right to been teaching violin himself since he
immediate occupation of eastern was 16. 41e will continue his work in
Thr'ace, and have given the Allies a music and plans to instruct a limited
number of students during the year.
time limit, expiring this evening, for nu_____tdetdrgth__ a'
a reply on this question. The Turks
have refused to accept the proposal PoF BON ND T
for Allied occupation of Thrace or an 1
Allied control, and apparently they fll
are supported in this stand by the E S'SCONGREG TION
French and Italiaxi governments. _ _
Wait British Reply Prof. I. Leo Sharfman of the eco-
Everything seems now to depend on nomics department and Dr. Leo I.
the British cabinet reply to the report Franklin, of the Temple Beth-El, De-
of Brigadier General Harington which troit, will be the principal speakers
was said to be anxiously awaited in on the program of Red-Letter Day, to
Constantinople this evening. It was be held at three o'clock tomorrow,
expected that General Harington which will mark the opening of the
would ask from the Turks an exten- activities of the Jewish Student Con-
sion of their time limit for the occupa- gregation.
tion of Thrace until tomorrow morn- Oscar A. Brown, president of the
ing, when he hoped to be in possession organization, stated that it was the
of his government's instructions. In purpose of this meeting to explain to
the meantime General Harington has the new students the purposes and
preceded the other Allied representa- functions of the Student Congregation,
tives back to Mudania in the hope of and also to serve as a get-to-gether
renewing the conference.. for former members. A program of
Bouillon Favors Turks music and entertainment has been ar-
The fact that M. Franklin Bouillon, arranged, Fred Zierer's orchestra
the French envoy; again has accom- having ben secured. It is expected that
panied the French delegate to Mu- approximately 500 will attend this
dani, is interpreted in official circles opening meeting.
here as a bad sign, as he is regarded Other officers of the organization
as supporting the views of Mustapha for the present year are: Mabel Au-
Kemal Pasha, the Turkish nationalist gust, '24, vice-president; Leo J.
leader, although it is not definitely Hershdorfer, '23, secretary; and
known whether the French govern- Stanley Sloss, '24, treasurer.
ment actually is backing him in his
attitude. Ithaca, N. Y.-A number of interest-'
Apparently Elipherios Venizelos, the ing deductions have been made from
former Greek Premier, is putting no a recent vote carried on among the
obstacles in the way of Turkish occu- alumni of Cornell University. The'
pation of Thrace, and is advising the vote was for the election of trustees.
Greek government against a military The figures on the election however

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Student Council Will.
cations oi New
Rooms

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MEETINGS CHARACTERIZED
UNUSUALLY POOR,
ATTENDANCE

BY

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ALL LITS AND LAWS TO
MEET EARLY NEXT WEEK

CLASSES OF FIVE
ICOLLEGES ELECT
YEA'S OFFICERlS

BORDEN LUSU. So
Canadian Statesiaan Trnces Develop-
ment of British
Colonies
STRESSES ADVANTAGES OF
UNFORTIFIED FRONTIERS
Tracing first the political develop-
ment along constitutional lines, Sir
Robert Borden stressed, during the
latter part' of his address last night in
Hill Auditorium, the relations among
the English-speaking peoples, partic-
ularly the neighborly association of,
this country and Canada.
Constitution Unchanged
He indicated that the constitution
has not been materially modified 'for
fully a century and a half. Turning
to the other systems of government

Announce Lo-
Voting

i

GLEE CLUBKPERNE
TO BE ENLARGED SOON

I

Fourth Inning
Yankees-Groh threw out Dugan at
first. Ruth was hit by a pitched ball.
Pipp fanned. Babe Ruth started to
steal second and when the 'pitcher
threw to second base he darted safe-
ly back to first. Frisch made' a muss
of Meusel's grounder and when Ruth
tried for third he was out, Frisch to
Groh. No runs, no hits, one error.
Giants: Kelly got a single which
Ward was barely able to knock down.
Kelly went out stealing, Schang to
Scott. Dugan threw out Cunningham-
at first. Smith got 'a long hit into
left for a single. lie took no chances
with Bob Meusel's arm. Scott whiffed.
No runs, two hits, no errors:.
Fifth Inning
Yankees: Schang went out, Kelly to
Scott. Ward sent up a high one, which
Cunningham took. Scott fouled out to
Groh. No runs, no hits, no errors.
Giants: Bancroft fanned. Groh bunt-
ed but Dugan came in fast and threw
him out. Frisch walked. Frisch went
out stealing, Schang to Scott. No
runs, no hits, no errors.
Sixth Inning
Yankees: Hoyt got a single into
right. Witt forced Hoyt, Bancroftnto.
Frisch. Dugan flied' to Meusel. Min-
gled cheers and hoots greeted Ruth.
Ruth went out to Kelly, unassisted.
No runs, one hit, no errors.
Giants: Meusel flied out to his
brother in left field. Young shot a
single over Scott's head. Kelly foul-
ed out to Pipp. Cunningham went'
out, Ward to Pipp. No runs, one hit,
no errors.

Out of 150 tryouts for the vocal sec-
tion of the University Glee clubs, ap-
proximately 60 will be selected, and
out of more than 60 tryouts for the
instrumental section of the club, 16
will be chosen,' according to James
C. Stevens, '23 business manager of
the club. Tryouts for specialty -acts
are being held daily from 2 to 4
o'clock in room 308 of the Union,
and tryouts for the freshman glee
club will be held as soon as possible,
the exact date to be announced later.
It is to be remembered that no first
year men on the campus with advanc-
ed credit will be eligible for posi-
tions on the Glee club until they have'
spent at least one semester on the
campus. On account of this ruling,
many men who could otherwise qual-
ify, have not made the tryouts be-
cause of the University ruling. The
names of the men who made the club
'will be announced in about a week,
their names first having to be passed
upon by the committee on eligibility.
A number of clarinet players are
needed for the instrumental section
of the Glee club, of which Paul R.
Wilson, '23L, is the leader Those
Glee club men who will sing for Tra-
ditions Night will rehearse at 4
o'clock next. Wednesday evening in
the upper reading room of the Union.
GUILD TO PRESENT FILM

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Meetings to nominate all officers in
all classes of the lit school and the
law school will be held on Tuesday.
The Student Council at its last meet-
ing declared the nominations for class
officers in both of these colleges in-
valid, because of insufficient attend-
ance at the various meetings that
were held the past week.
Must Have Quorum
Unless there is a satisfactory at-
tendance at the Tuesday meetings,
these nominations will also be declar-
ed void. The Council takes the stand
that the officers of the .various classes
are too important to be elected by
such a small minority of the class.
Senior lits will meet at 4 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon in Newberry Hall.
All Junior lits will assemble for nom-
inations at 4 o'clock Tuesday in the
auditorium of University hall. Soph
lits will meet at 5 o'clock. in Univer-
sity hall. Theameeting places for all
law classes will be announced later.
Fi ve Colleges Compete
The results of the elections held
yesterday in the Engineering, Archi-
tectural, Medical,Dental, and Educa-
tional schools are as follows:' senior
engineers: president, (will be an-
nounced later) ; vice ', president, E.
Haug; secretary, H. *ckinney; and
treasurer, L. Kirkpatrick. Junior en-
gineers: president, J. Polhamus; vice
president, J E. Duffy; secretary, F.
Kratz; and treasurer, H. Hubbard.
Sophomore engineers: president, H.
Miller; vice president, W. Webb; sec-
retary, E. Fox; and treasurer, F. Hart.
For the senior Medics, J W. Half-
hill was elected president; Mary
Saxe, vice-president; J. E. Crous-
hore, secretary; and K. P. Jones,
treasurer. Junior Medics: presi-
dent, L. Brunstring; secretary, C. C.
Merkle; and treasurer, George Green,
Soph Medics: president, A. C. Cur-
tis; vice-president, F. Schemm; sec-
retary, J. K. Hazel; and treasurer, F
Scott. Fresh Medics: president, A.
L. Schultz; vice-president, C. C. Mc-
Rae; secretary, L. Hayes; and treas-
urer, Fred Thomas.
Senior dents: president, George
Fish; vice-president, George Moore
secretary, L. . Reigelmann; and
treasurer, F. S. Cartwright. Junior
dents, president: W. E. Taylor; sec-
retary, H. Houvenor; and treasurer,
C. Giffen. Soph dents: president, J.
P. Beukema; vice-president, R. E.
Kingery; secretary, B. L. Noonan;
and treasurer, William Curran.
In the School of Education the sen-
iors elected C. Duncan, president;
Rose Barton, vice-president; D. Koe-
pel, secretary, and. W. P. Raynor,
treasurer.
Senior architects: president, H. L.
Farley; vice-president, E. L. Kline;.
secretary, Laura A. Eckert; and
treasurer, E. H. Lundin. Junior arch-
itects: president, J. E. Dinwiddie;
vice-president, L. 0. Perry; secre-
tary, Augusta Stewart; and treasur-
er, R. F. Calder. Sophomore archi-

which then prevailed and those which
have since devloped, those in Great
Britain and those in the portions of the
British Commonwealth that have ac-
quired the status of self-governing na-
tions,, Borden traced briefly' the
changes in the governments of those
hations.
Sir Robert Borden emphasized the.
fact that the principle of executive
responsibility, to the people's repre-
sentative was fully acknowledged not
through "statutory provision or for-
mal enactment of the law," but was
consumated by the adoption of a rec-
ognized convention."
Lauds Caiada-U. S. Status
CaTouching uponnthe things which
Canada and the United. States have in
common Sir Robert Borden empha-
sized, "No two nations in the world
under separate systems of government
are so firmly united socially, commer-
cially and politically as the people of
Canada and of the United States.
There are no two nations with thou-
sands of miles of boundary so un-
guarded; no nations bordering onj
great inland seas whose waters are
so untroubled by armed navies."
Commenting on this Borden said,
"Can you doubt the infinite advant
age? May we not take just pride in
this confidence of mutual trust and in
the true nobility of this splendid un-
preparedness for war? Consider the
hundreds, yes, the thousands of mil-
lions that might have been squandered
on bristling fortifications, on navies,
or armaments, along that wide border
from ocean to'ocean."
"With you, as with us, there are
various elements of danger. There is
an increased tendency to unequal
distribution of wealth. Industrial riv-
alry arrays nation against nation."
Sir Robert Borden took pride in the
Peace Conference at Paris and in the
Washington Conference last year. Of
these he said, "From each of these
conferences I returned with the belief,
that upon the public opinion of the
nations rests the one hope for the fu-
ture peace.
"It is impossible for any people to
disinterest or disengage, itself from
the welfare of every other, and upon
each there is a new and increasing
responsibility for the preservation of
peace, and for the salvation of the
world from the unspeakable and over-
whelming horrors of another war. Es-
pecially upon the great English-
speaking Commonwealth, which alto-
gether exercises an unequalled power,
and influence in world affairs, that
constant and searching responsibility
does unmistakably rest."
CONERCE CLUB COMM. PLANS
GREATLY ENLARGED PROGRAM
Consideration of plans to enlarge
the activities of the Commerce Club.
for the coming year and perhaps to
effect some very important changes
took place at a meeting of the execu-
tive committee in the Union last

Hopes and fears of50,000 Michigan
football supporters, alumni and stu-
dents, will center on Ferry field at
2 o'clock central standard time this
afternoon when the 1922 Varsity plays
its first regular game of the season
with the Case Scientific school elev-
en, of Cleveland.
This afternoon's encounter will
mark the close of an intensive cam-
paign of preparation for the -big
games, a campaign that started last
spring when Yost and Weiman work-
ed for six weeks with some 60 strug-
gling aspirants for a place in the
Wolverine sun. Whether or not all
the weeks of labor have been suc-
cessful, whether or not Michigan will
'have an entry in the Big Ten title
chase that will be a contender till
the last whistle blows, all these things
will be decided this afternoon.
Twenty-Sixth Game
Today's encounter marks the twen-
ty-seventh time the two teams
have met on Ferry field since the first
game was played in 1894. Twenty-
four times have the fighting Case grid-
ders come up from Cleveland .to re-
turn with an overwhelming score
pilled up against them while their
share has usually been a large zero.
On the twenty-fifth occasion, and
one that is memorable in the Case
footballiannals, the Scientists suc-
ceeded in holding the men of Yost to
a 3-3 tie. This unheard of perform-
ance was put on during the season of
1910 when the Wolverines scored but
29 points during the entire campaign.
Two other teams succeeded in hold-
ing the Maize and Blues warriors even,
that season, Ohio State by a 3-3 count
and Pennsylvania by a scoreless tie.
Syracuse was defeated 11 to 0 how-
ever and Minnesota succumbed 6 to 0.
Michigan Heavy Winner
In the 25 engagements between the
two teams Michigan has amassed 772
points while the enemy collected 46.
Last year's 64 to 0 verdict was the
worst trouncing today's visitors have
ever sustained.tHowever, they have
always been noted for their sports-
manlike conduet on the field and their
desperate stands against overwhelm-
ing odds which assures the specta-
tors this afternoon of seeing a team
in action that won't q it.
But one change in th lineup as an-
nounced by Coach Yost Thursday will
be made tis afternoon as he Var-
sity lines up. Bob Knobe t be at
the helm in place of Uteritz, who was
originally nominated for that post.
Uteritz and Captain Goebel are in
Columbus with Coach Yost to see what
the Buckeyes will have to offer
against Ohio Wesleyan this after-
noon.

'attempt to retain the province.

are the most interesting part of it. -

I

_._ _

Veteran Newspaper Man Gives
Daily Highest Commendation

Seventh Inning
Yankees: Frisch threw out Pipp
at first. Meusel got a single behind
the pitcher. Schang got a double into
right, Meusel going to third. Elmer
Smith batted for Ward. Coach Hughey
Jfnnings and Bancroft held a consul-'
tation. Smith struck out. Bancroft'
threw out Scott. No runs, two hits,
no errors.
Giants: McNally played 'second
baseIuin mn' of 'Woad T ' -,n

I
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"One a Minute," featuring Douglas
McLean, will be the latest moving pic-
ture put on by the Wesleyan Guild of
the Methodist church at 8:00 o'clock
tonight in the auditorium of Wesley
hall. This is one of the latest of the
activities of the Wesleyan Guild and
it is hoped in this way to add a new
phase to their social activities. '
A new projecting machine has been
purchased by the Guild and install-
ed in the auditorium which gives
them excellent facilities. A silver
collection will be taken to defray the
cost of the films.

"Historic old Ferry field in the
stress and excitement of a big foot-
ball game, is not the only place
where the maize and blue 'fight- 'em'
spirit cros out It is unmistakably
present in the office of The Michigan
Daily."
This was the declaration yesterday
of a veteran newspaper man when he
paid a visit to the office of the Uni-
versity newspaper. Unconscious of
his presence, the staff members were
hurrying to and fro, holding split-
second consultations with each other,
clacking away determinedly at the
typewriters, or reading copy and

Ito prevail. Such an attitude of will-
ingness to render service should
certainly bring splendid results. It
makes me think of the 'get-there' at-
titude of Yost's warriors, somehow."
Recent events at The Daily indicate
that the newspaper man's opinons are
not wholly unfounded. Last week one
of the Sunday Magazine writers, pick-
ing up a hot tip at 10 p. m. Friday, ran
it down, secured his interview, and
wrote until dawn to complete the ar-
ticle. By co-operation from the me-
chanical department the story wa.
rushed through and made the Sunday
issue.
Several days ago a Daily cub spent

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Anode at Quarter
Roby and Kipke will start at either
side of Knode in the backfield, and
will no doubt stay on, the scene just
long enough to start the team on the
way to a decisive win. Kipke will be
in his second scrimmage of the year
this afternoon, Yost having elected to
keep his star away from any possi-
bility of damage heretofore. In his
single appearance in real competition
on Ferry field this year the veteran
halfback proved conclusively that he
is if anything in even better form than
he was when the season closed last
year. His flashy runs are sure to
feature the matinee while he is in.
The kicking duties will also devolve
upon Kipke this after'noon.
Roby will be counted upon to gain
great yardage with his crashing off
tackle drives this afternoon. The big
halfback has been going strong
against theReserves in practice and
it is safe to say that he will better
this performance when confronted by
a hostile line.
Canpon at Full
There is not a doubt in the mind of
anyone who is conversant with the
situation that Cappon, who will start
at fullback, will tear the Case line to
fragments if given any kind of a start
by his forwards. He is heavier than
at any previous tire in his career
and is a man who knows how to use
every ounce of his weight in his line
drives. After the first line backs
have had an adequate workout the
coaches plan to rush the second
string set, composed of Foster at
quarter, Keefer and Steger, at halves,
and Dunleavy, full, into the fray.

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Kilties for Band Uniforms
Pittsburgh-What is thought to be

writing heads, according to

their

their

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