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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 06, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDA

3

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the, ri~se for republication of all
news dispatches credited to it or not other-
wise credited in this paper and the local
newsl published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Anu Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
ness, 960.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
if signed, the signature not necessarily to
appear in print.butas an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in
The, Daily at th4 discretion of the Editor, if
left at or mailed to The Daily office. Un-
signed communications will receive no con-
sideration. No inauuscript will be returned
unless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
does not necessarily endorse the sentiments
expressed in the communications.
El)I TORIAL STAFF
Telephones, 2414 and 176-11
MANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
City Editor ........ ...James B. Young
Assistant City Editor .......... arion Kerr
Editorial Board Chairman...E. R. Meiss
Night Editors-y
Ralph Byers. I-Harry Iloey
J. P. Dawson, Jr. 3. .E. Mack
L. F. Iiershdorfr R. C. Moriarty
H. A. Donahue
Sports Editor......,........F. H. McPiice
Sunday Magazine Editor.......Delbert Clark
Wornej's lhditor..............Marion Koch
uor ditr...............Donald Cor ty
Conference Editor.... .1...H.B. Gruntdy
Pictorial Editor ...............Robert Tarr
Music Editor..................E. H. Ailes
Assistants

M. IT. Pryor
Dorothy B wcnctts
laurice Beiman
R. A. Blilin gtont
W. 13. Butler
IT. C. Clark.
A. B. Cni iahle
livelyn J. Coughlin
l uge l armichael
Bernadette Cote
Wallae F Eliott
T.Ie Fiske
Maxwell leadl

John Garlnvhouse
Isabel Fishe:
Winona A. Hibbard
Sanmel Moore
T. G. McShane
W. B. Rafferty
W. H,.Stoneman
Virginia Tryon
1.'. M. Wagner
A. P. Webbink
Franlin Dickpian
Joseph Epstein
J. W. Ruwitch

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Adver tising......... .. ..John J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertisng........ .Edward F. Conlin
Advertising . .........Walter K. Scherer,
Accounts..........Laurence H. ay rot
Circulation.........David J. M. Park
Publication..............Beaumont Parks
Assistants

Townsend II. Wolfe
Kenneth Seick
George Rockwood
etry AM. hayden
Eugene ,. IDunne
Wi. rai-lich, Jr.
John C. ffaskiiV
Haivey E. eed
C. -. Putnam
E. I). arinantrout
H. WV.Cooper
W allaceHower'
1"dw. B. Riele
1larold ]P- Hale

Alfred A. White
Wm. ). Roesser
Allan S. Morton
James A. D~ryer:
jm. II Good
Clyde L. I-agerman
A. Ifartwell, Jr.
J. Blumenthal
Howard Hayden
V. eK.Kidder,
lenry Freud
Ilerbert P. Bostwick
L. Pierce

few men not affiliated with Greek let-
ter' organizations 'who' were present
took on the whole an inactive part
in the proceedings.
This apparent lack * of interest
among the so-called independent"
men on the campus perhaps accounts
for the intermittently recurring cry
that the fraternities run student af-
fairs at Michigan. The fraternities do
make an organized effort to support
campus customs and enterprises.
With this in' mind, if he Is to main-
tain his position.as a factor in cam-
pus affairs, the independent should
take an equal interest in the events
and activities which constantly take
place.
The non-fraternity men will do well
to make up for their absence from
class meetings by casting a ponder-
ed, intelligent vote at the election
booths today.
A THIRTEEN-YEAR-OLD SUIT
A sum of $1,500 has been granted
by the Regents of the University to
buy uniforms for ,MIchigan's band.
This is one-half the amount necessary
for the expenditure, and this morning
the Board in Control of Athletics
meets to decide whether or not it will
grant the other half.
,Regardless of where the money
comes from, the band must have new
uniforms. Those used las season
have served their purpose for thir,
teen years, during which time has
'ome to them darns and patches of
every make and variety. Now they
have reached the last mending, and
have outlived their final vestige of
usefulness.
Meanwhile other conference univer-
sities have been more considerate of
their bands. But a single university
renewed its uniforms as far back as
four years ago, and the remainder
have all done so more recently than
that. The Michigan band has used
its outfit more than three times as
long as any other conference univer-
,slty.
That the band is deserving of
weighty consideration in this regard
cannot be doubted. The function of
'the organization is such that the
Board in Control of Athletics should
feel much the same concern as if the
football team had not had a new suit
of clothes for an equally long period
of time.
THE RURAL SCHOOL
The little red school house, the cit-
adel of the democracy of the past
century, which has been idealized in
the poetry and song of the nation, is
still prevalent in many rural dis-
tricts, though long ago it has out-
lived its efficiency. The subtle humor
of Mark Twain plus the sentimental
hokum of Longfellow have served to
make it a tradition in the eyes of the
American farmer, and, consequently,
most communities still tolerate it.
In the seventies and eighties the
little red school house performed a
most ambitious function. Not only
was it the scene where elementary
instruction was given to the "bare-
foot boys" and "coy and bashful
maidens" of Longfellow's and Whit-
tier's time, but it served as the so-
cial nucleus of the community, where
the bazaars, festivals, and even barn
dances were held. It reflected the
democracy and life of the village.
But now in localities where the lit-
tle red school house still erists it is
a symbol of primitiveness. It is an
impotent factor in moder education,
and sentimentality ought not to inter-
fere with its abolishment, together
with the backward system of in-

struction which has always been
identified with it, in favor of a mod-
ern scool. Such an insitution, known
as the consolidated school, provides a
bus to carry students to and from the
building, thereby making it possible
for more boys and girls to attend.
Also because of the increased amount
of funds available, a better building,
modern equipment ,and more and bet-
ter instructors are furnished, - in
short, all the advantages of the city
school.
The problem of rural education has
become more serious not because
farmers will not appropriate enough
money for the work, but because the
little red school house has become so
overly idealized that it has assumed
the form of a tradition, the eradica-
tion of which is looked upon by many
farmers as sacriligious.
According to reports a new class
in creative listening has been creat-
ed. It meets daily from three to five
in front of the Arcade theater. There
are no prerequisites and anyone can
join the class. What a wonderful
thing istthe radio.
At Northwestern they are making
efforts to get the mail to the dormi-
tory women before they go to clash.
They claim it relieves the anxiety of
waiting. We'll admit there is some

EDITORIAL COMMENT
C 0 T IBU I NS THE POINT SSTEM FALLACY
MWE111)BERED IN (The Daily.Illini)

MICHIGAN

HEAVEN
EAST IS EAST AND WEST HALL IS
STILL WEST HALL
In our very real though seldom
earnest life this is the first we have
ever sprung into a breach -into
breeches many a time,-but into a
breech, never before. The strain
may wrench a mental tendon beyond
the powers of an intellectual ArchieI
Hahn, but West Hall must and shall
be done justice. It has been suggest-
ed that we
Use It as a lab. for Zoo. 34-"Tlie
spider and its web."
THE BROTHERS TROJANOWSKI
"JOHN Trojanowski has
Sold his barber-shop."
--Toasted Rolls.
Although JOHN Trojanowski has sold
his Barber-shop -
The shaving Trojanowskis doe not
entrely stop
It appears there is another-
John's elder, graver brother;
And he has not (Oh he has not) sold"
his barber-shop!
So before you let the matter drop
Please listen to the pleasant strop
Coning from a South U shop

Labelled

"JULIAN

Trojanowski,

Prop.".
IT COMES to us that Frosh Tradi-
tion Is To Be Inforced. Hurray for
the enforcement of Tradition! Let's
have some state police down to en-
force a little applause at the con-
certs. And why not enforce a little
deep appreciation of the objets d'art
in Alumni Memorial Hall?
AND IF Detroit is to become the
Air Headquarters as yesterday's Daily
maintained, why, won't that be con-
flicting with the natural prerogatives
of Congress?
Or Possibly He Means to Emphasize
the "Gall"
Probably the linotype operator has
a cold, too. lie spelt you GALigula
yesterday, we observed. QQ.
L'AMOUR PERDU
October Evening On the Diagonal
Tonight all things proclaiml
Romance is near.
That Love is still the same
Tonight all things proclaim.
Yet, though so near the flame,
Untouched I wander here;
Tonight all things proclaim
Rfmance is-near.
TMAS A. CELANO.
CHUBB HOUSE AT THE ZERO
HOUR
Colossal temple of modernity-
man's monum nt to the victory ofI
matter over spirit. Dismaying confu-
sion of myriad virginal-draped boards
bounding labyrinthine cul-de-sacs.
Scurrying files of pre-Volsteadianly
attired tray-juggling academicians.
Cacophonous charivari reminiscent of
boiler factories and screeching L
trains, emanating from countless
hives of young intellectuals, feverish-
ly animated by phobia of. vitamine
deficiency. Gourmands of infinite ca-
pacity-epicures of discriminating ca-
pacity. Is there no God-who cares?
RIGOR MORTIS.
THE PARMINTER Prize of a cop-
per-riveted Fall cold goes to Math
51 which gr.ced by the presences of
Jekyll and Hyde.

The point system seems to be com-
ing for its annual round of considera-
tion by American universities. After
an observation of the way the point
system for women worked here before
it was discarded ,and some participa-
tion in campus activities,twe pro-
nounce the point system impractical,
unnecessary and undesirable.
The Cornell student council propos-
es a system which has for its pur-
poses: "(1) to regulate and restrict
the amount of activities in which an
undergraduate may participate; (2)
to improve scholarship and the stand-
ard of curriculum work; (3) to dis-
tribute student positions more wide-
ly, creating a greater interest on the
part of undergraduates as a whole;
(4) to lessen the burden of excessive
responsibility now placed on a small
group"'.
The student council at Ohio State
proposesto place restrictions on the
participation of students who do not
maintain an average grade of C
The Tulsa (Okla) Collegian states:
"The faculty is certainly to be com-
mended for taking the step it did in
regard to regulating the number of
active offices which a student might
hold."
We are firm believers in the law of
supply and demand as applied to stu-
dent activity leadership Any other
method of controlling student enter-
prise seems arbitrary, idealistic, and
unwarranted. No standard of points
could be devised which would fy
more than one individual. The capa-
bilities of students vary so widely that
forcing one to restrict his activities
to one or more fields may be quite un-
just.' It is just as though we were to
say to a business man with much cap-
ital, you shall not invest in more
than one business. The student with
a generous allowance of talent should
be able to capitalize on it to his best
advantage.
It is argued that students engage
in too many actvities, to the detri-
men of their studies. Is it not true
that some students play too much
billiards, or go to too many movies?
Students ruin their health by overtax-
ing themselves? It depends on the
individual. He may have a nervous
breakdown just as surely if he crams
too hard, or if he plays too much
tennis, or if he doesn't exercise
enough. The point system endeavors
to limit the amount of responsibility a
student may assume. It might just as
well attempt to make him sleep nine
hours a day, or take a bath oftener
than Saturday night.
"But our student activities are dom-
inated by a small clique of men and
women," the point system agitators
cry, "If we had more students inter-
ested, our activityrmanagement would
be impoved." True enough, if they
would be more interested. But the es-
tablishment of the point system here
failed to ereate any important in-
crease in interest in activities. There
is no reason why it should. Student
activities now are open to Ill who
care to compete. If any man who
will specialize on a single activity has
a good chance to win there, how much
greater hope has he of beating a com-
petitor who branches out in several
lines of endeavor? The growing im-
portance of an activity calls more
candidates and produces an automatic
elimination of the honor collectors.
The man who can handle more than
one position well should be honored,
and not handicapped. This is one set
of conditions in which "to the victor
the spoils" may be applied without
intimating evil.
CAMPUS OPINION

Editor The Michigan Daily:
On Wednesday Oct. 4, the freshman
law class held a meeting at which they
nominated officers for the year. In
this morning's issue of The Daily
there was published an article stat-
ing that the Student council had de-
clared the nominations void and giv-
ing as a 'reason the fact that an in-
sufficient number of class members
was present. We would respectfully
call the following facts to the atten-
tion of the council and the student
body as a whole.
The total membership of the fresh-
man law class,, according to the re-
corder's office, is approximately one
hundred seventy-five. On the first
ballot there were seventy-five votes
cast and oan the second sixty-five for
the office of president, which makes
the total of votes cast forty-eight per
cent on the first ballot and forty-four
per cent on the second.
The junior literary class has a mem-
bership of approximately eight hun-
dred as near as can be ascertained.
At its meeting something like one
hundred to one hundred twenty-five

Michigan

Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

I

,

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson

F
Air-

TIME TABLE

(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars -6:oc
am., 7:00 a~rn., 8:oo a.m., 9:05 a~m. and
hourly to 9:os p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m., and every two hours
to 9j:47 p.mn.
Local Cars East Bound-7 :oo a.m. and ev-
ery' two hours to 9 :oo p.m., t t :0o p.m. To
Ypsilanti only- :4opm..'1:15a".m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:so a.m., 12:10
To Jackson and Kalamazoo - Limited cars
8:47, 10:47 a.m., 2:47, 2:47, 4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited at 8:47
p.mII.
1922 OCTOBER 1922
S M T W T F SI
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 1S 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
Start Right With a Good Hat!
We do all kinds of HIGH CLASS
Cleaning and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for GOOD WORK. When
you want a hat done RIGHT bring
it to us, our work is regular FACTO-
RY WORK. Hats turned ins~de out
with all new trimmings are like new.
We also make and sell POPULAR
PRICE and HIGH GRADE hats, FIT
THEM TO YOUR HEAD and save you
a dollar or more on a hat. We give
values and quote prices which cannot
be excelled in Detroit or anywhere
else. Try us for your next hat.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
(Where D.U.R. Stops at State Street)
DR. W. S. MILLS
OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN
616 first Nat'l Bk. Bldg.
Office Hours Phone
9-12; 1:30-5 32141
Your name neatly embossed in gold
on all
Purchased at
RIDER'S PEN SHOP
308 So. State St.

A-

Fall-High Arch -Dressy

Snuggles smartly around the
ankle-accentuates the arch.
Something entirely new-
brought into favor by longer
skirt draping.

48.CO

,

'"' !E'er

115 South Main Street

: A T

a .

GRAHAMS'
BOTH STORtES

4,
-aw

r

k

fir

1

LAST EDITION OF

Under New Management

ALL HOME COOKING

We are operating for the student's con-
venience, and, his satisfaction. Must be'
complete.
WE SPECIALIZE IN SHORT ORDERS
(Outside Regular Meal Times)
AFTER THEATER PARTIES, SUNDAY DINNERS,
AND SUNDAY EVENINc LUNCHES

SONG

B OOK

Our Ladies' Table will appeal to those who

demand the best.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1922
Night ]editor-HARRY D. HOEY
THE CAMPUS AND HAZING
n order that the present year. may
proceed unhampered by the occasion-
al misunderstanding between sopho-
mores and freshmen which ave oc-
curred in the past, it is well at this
time that the underclassmen realize
the position taken by the University
and the campus in general concerning
the relations between first and sec-
ond 3ear students. '
Mob hazing at Michigan has been
practically . eliminated in recent,
years due to strong student opinion
against this brutal and sometimes fa-
tal form of freshman discipline. The
vast majority of responsible men on
the campus 'realize the unfairness as
well as the dangers of hazing, and
consequently strict measuers have
been taken to guard against any such
unlawful outbreaks, and in case they
occur, to punish those involved.m
What little excuse there may have
been advanced to defend hazing in-
cidents in the past, namely ,that this
was the most effective way to make
freshmen observe the traditional
rules, was completely done away with
by the formation of the Underclass
Conduct committee two years ago. It
is the function of this committee to
take care of all cases involving fresh-
men who are delinquent in observing
the disciplinary rules by which they
are expected to abide. If a sopho-
more or upperclassman feels that
these regulations are being infringed
upon, he need only report the offender
to a member of the Underclass Con-
duct committee and due measures will
immediately be taken to bring the
recalcitrant first year man back to the
fold.
In other words, sophomores must
realize that hazing is a thing of the
past, done away with by the mass of
sane college men who have left their
boyish bullying behind them. The
freshman class must take into con-
sideration at the same time, that its
best interest is served in the adher-
ence to Michigan's traditional rules

Univesity Dining Rooms
1212 S. UNIVERSITY

h. U

(

j
rh
l
r ...
'
. I
"
iL:'J "
tv
4
' "
.hp....

"RAGS Mf)
RQY.AL &av

The dog looked 'round
The Ark and said:
"Oh, Noah, have
Aheart, be kind;
Of other creatures
I've no dread -
But please leave those
Two fleas behind?"
Long-Boy.

.

Gallows-Meat
The loving couple in the rear
most every class room.

of al-I

FAVORITE OUTDOOR sports
football fans. Put-and-take.
tims-freshmen.

for
Vic-

"Rags are royal raiment,"' says
the old song, "when worn for
virtue's sake."
The trouxble is, the casual '
observer doesn't know about
the virtue and concludes that
you don't know any better-
or haven't the price.
You might wear mediocre
clothes because you believe
in democracy, but you can't
tell everybody about it. It's
more sensible to wear good
clothes because you believe
in good business.

f.

l

WHAT STRUCK YOUR EYE TODAY
The Aztec sweaters some girls
wear.
The name of John Hancock, in-
ventor of signatures, on a Block M
petition.
AND DO women who go to the Ar-
cade Barber Shop to have their hair
bobbed also get a chanet on the O.
S. U. trip?

Society Brand Clothes
look like success-
that's why successful
men wear them.

Fall is a handsome season.

Xx T4-U A 1..U Iu lr-.t 42, e"N,.r

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