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March 18, 1923 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-03-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY"" '

l1

LI-TC-A

COBB BNKS I THISL ER

e -
By Jack Keene
The education of Jimmy O'Connell.
X75,000 beauty of the Giants, is now
'under way. There are several things
helhas to'iearn about the art of play-
ing ball as they play it under the bi;
tent. Wherefore John McGraw is de'
termined that he shall learn and the
training of the youngster has begun
Being an apt pupil, O'Connell is lear-
ning quite rapidly and by the time the
season opens, he probably will have
absorbed the bulk of what McGraw
now is showing him.
Judging fly balls that come to him
out of the blinding glare of the sun
is something at which O'Connell. i
not yet particularly adept. Jimmy was
not an outfielder by choice at the out-
set of his pirofessional. career. He
played first base and, if one may be
guided by the form he has shown in H
few workouts around the initial sack
at San Antonio, Tex., he must hav(
played it pretty well: When the Giants
purchased himn, higwever; it was wvitt
the intention of using him in the out-
field. George Kelly is so good and
stands up so welt under the strair
of hard. play day in and day out that
McGraw is, not yet buying anybody
with a view of using him in Kelly'r
place. So, last year when Jack Mil-
ler went.out to San Francisco to man-
age the club in that city, McGraw ask-
ed him to convert O'Connell into ar
outfielder.
It came to pass that O'Connell was
switched from first base and took up
his stand in the 'outfield. . As. to what
he accomplished there the records d(
not tell a very flattering tale. 0'
course, the records do not always tell
the complete truth or anything like i'_
about a player, but they are offered'
for what they are worth. Among the
outfielders who played in 150 games or
more in the Coast league-the teams
average about 200 games a season-
O'Connell ranked no higher than thir-
teenth. Men. like Babe Twombley, Joe.
Wilbert and Duffy Lewis had better
marks than O'Connell, who, was char-
god with twenty-one er.rqrs in 172
games. From' the coast comes a hint
that Jimmny car't go back on balls over
his head, and from the manner in

5 T. IBy Norman .E1 .Brown
Ty)Cobb is going to give Henry Man-
ush, young Western league outfielder,
plenty of opportunity to show his met-
al this spring. Manush comes up to
which he playdt the sunfield against the Tigers with a slugging mark of
I San Antonio recently it is quite evi- .376 and a fielding average of .374,
dent that he is far from being a George with Omaha. He is oft he type Cobb
Burns in the sunfield. . admires-husky, sturdy build, free-
It is not surprising on the wholeI swinging hitter and fast afield and onI
that O'Connell did not run up a bet- the bases. lie hits from the first base
ter mark in the outfield. Polished out- side of the plate.
fielders are not made in a single sea- ;Manush has a grand litt-e opportun-
son. Indeed some outfielders lingera ity with tho Tigers. Bobby Veach,
in the major leagues for years with- who 1as been a ienilexr of Detroit's
out attaining a really high grade in ball murdering outfit trio for many
their play, but in the case of O'Con- moons, is getting along in years. Ty-
nell there is every reason to hope for rus Raymond himself is enaring the
a substantial margin of improvement end of his playing days. Harry Heil-
this season, and for even more in sea- man is the only member of the out-
sons to come. As to playing the sun- field now who has several years ahead
field, very few men ever become let- of him. Bob Fothergill 'is the only
ter perfect. In this instance it will be cther outfielder the Tigers now carry
necessary for O'Connell to play with who is ready to step into a vacancy
the sun in his eyes only on two or !ud play the kind of a game Cobb
three diamonds around the National wants.
league circuit. B So Manush, if he shows lnhty of
Premxise and a willingniess to wai thi.~
Any rumor that Bill Brennan dig chance, may some day find him2elf cay-
the well known flop thing in his or'ting in the outer garden for the bat-
fho++7n ;+h T-- 7J YrllA AR -7- v..,-3, iil.715ai cnr w

We say it and say it advisedly-
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IN COLLEGE INN

s

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I

TELL IT TO THE

'battle with LuiS Firpo Monday nighi
can be set at rest. Brennan didn't de
any flop. A man doesn't take a beat-
ing for twelve rounds and then flop.
He flops before he gets all mussed up
Firpo's victory over the Chica c'
man doesn't mean much. Brennan is1
an old man, as pugilists go, and hej
hasn't been of much account for the
last two or three years. Firpo wile]

Sng jun~galeers.
have to beat somebody better than
Brennan to get a reputation for r
match with Dem psey.
Tex Rickard is talking of a bout
between Firpo and the winner of the
Floyd Johnson -Jess Willard scrap
which is to be staged in the Yankee
baseball park May 12.

F:
e '
Vii D,.1
}i".
n'
yf.
N
.
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--7S

JUDGE

'S

11

Dr.TomEndorses A thletics

ZOE

WAould you li1e to tell the judge
about that accident with your car, for
which you have been sued, or
Would you rather have a strong cor-
poration assume liability for ye
couri teady to give you the benefit
of their expert legal defense?
That's what Automobile Liability In-
saran cfemeans-a mighty comforting
resource in the day of need.
The time to buy it is immediately,

is open
Sunday from 5 to 10p.m.
Come in before or after the Show
for (among other things)
Real Chicken Salad
Fudge Ice Cream that is Right
Coffee and our Special Fruit Cake
Chocolate with Whipped Cream
Candy without a rival
13

In a recent statement Dr. Tomn Lov- Tom is also extremely versatile witlj
ell, T. N. T., A. W. O. L., E. T. C., hold- the checker b'oard and is said to hold
er of a score of other degrees endors- a gauntlet which was awarded himI
ed the participation of students in upon the winning of the Worchester
some form of athletics. The Doctor is shire sauce tournament in England. !
__ _first round will be announced in Tues-
sure of the fact that his brilliant ath- day's Daily.
letic career has been of great aid te nt, mv ,1 !f c
him in becoming the most accomplish- I e s Fraternity athletic managers should
ed writer of free verse on the globe.
Baek ii 1917 ti pdashro of oetvei em
(Continued fromrPage Six) meetttomorrow.

E

BU LER

i

1' ~ t 0 ,p Meli I~ 1jilY
and Irish music was placed on, Rail-
road Jack's mythical All-American
football team: According to "Rail-
road", Lovell was assigned the full
back position because his punts like
his poetry, would be over the heads
of everyone on the field.

(Continued from Page Six) n
announced through the columns of The The second half of the preliminaries
Daily. in the fraternity relay race will be
held at 7 o'clock Tuesday night.
Entries for the fraternity handball-
festival will close at 5 o'clock tomor- The way to rent a room is with a
row evening. The schedule for the "Daily Classified".-Adv.

INSURANCE

209 First National Bank Bldg.
Phone 401-21I

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. ti 8 . '. ..;s
n'

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C.,
wlw
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SAP t I: at t ,s r

212 $OUTH MAIN STREET
ENTIRE STOCK NOW IN POSSESSION OF THE

t
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DETROTI

GMER'Owoh ANTI.LE ADJUSTE125

TO BE TURNED INTO CASH IN 30 DAYS FOR WHAT ITWILLBRING. THE STOCK CONSISTS OF THE WORLD'SMOST FAMOI

iS SHOES

Such as Hannan & Son, Crossett, Ralston, Socket-Fit, Baker, Weyenberg and Lion Brand for Men. Sorosis, Arch
and many other high grade makes. The entire stock to be sold at the most astounding price reductions ever known in

Triumph, Socket-Fit, Crossett, Grovers, Duttenhoffer, and Stevens for Women.
Ann Arbor on Footwear of such high character.

R. T. Wood for Boys and Girls,

- 1' ]' - U - ,_ _

BIG LOT
CHILDREN'S SHIOES
OXFORDS AND SANDALS
$2.00 to $3.00 Values
95c
CHILDREN'S SHOES
Plain or Fancy Top, $3.50
Values
$1.65
CHILDREN'S
ShOES AND PUMPS.
$5.00 Values
$2.85
-PLAY OXFORDS
BAREFOOT SANDALS
$2.50 to $3.50 Values
$1.45
MISSES' ONE-STRAY
PATENT PUMPS
$6.00 Values
$3.45
MISSE _
SIGH GRADE SHOES
$7.00 Values
$3.8c5
LADIES OPERA
SLIPPERS
$5.00 Values
$2.85

Ladies' Pumps and Oxfords. Brown Black and
Patent Kid. One or more straps, Military
heels, worth $7.00 $3.85
go at . ................ ........
Ladies' Oxfords. Brown, Tan, and Black Kid
and Calf. Military heels. Ac- $4.85
tual value, $8.00 ..................."
Ladies' Oxfords Grovers. High grade Black

EXTRA SPECIAL-1,000 PAIR
Ladies' HighGrade Shoes
of e oery description-
$8.00 to $12.00 values go at

EXTRA SPECIAL-1,000 PAIR
Mens' Shoes and Oxfords

of every description
$8.50 to $11.00 values go at

.85

$4485

$ 385

ss

and

and

This lot consists of Sorosis, Grovers, Dut-
tenhoffer, and Stevens. Dressy up-to-date styles
and not old, back numbers such as you might
expect at this amazingly low price. Full range
of sizes. All go at $2.$5 to $4.85.

The lot includes Hannan & Son's Cros-
setts' and Ralston, in brown or black or differ-
ent styles, and all kinds of leather. Not all
sizes in every style, but all sizes in the lot for
a quick turnover. All go at $3.85 and $4.85.

Kid, Military or Low Heels.
Actual value, $9.00 ................

$5.85

U U ,~ i n ' .,fl. -. ..

Ladies' 1 or 2 Strap Pumps. Grovers Genuine
Black Kid, Turn or Welt Soles, Mili-6$445
tary eHels. $7.50 values ..........'
Ladies' Newest Pumps. Black and Patent Kid
and Suedes,.Spanish Heels, $6.85
Sorosis, $11.00 values............
Arch Triumph Oxfords. Finest Black and Brown
Kid Style! with a smile. $6.85
Actual Value $11.00.............

LADIES' SOCKET-FIT
SHOES AND OXFORDS
$785

MENS' HANNAN & SON

SHOES

MYN II'S IGH4ATOP

Men's PartroIman Shoes, Ralston. Heavy Com-
bination Sole in Brown or Black Calf, Blu-
cher. Actual $6.45
Value, $12.00 .....................
Mea's Work Shoes. Best Grade Elk Skin, All
Leather Soles, Well Made. $1.95
Worth $3.'50, go at..............
Men's Heavy Work Shoes. Guaranteed all solid
leather. A big lotin different $2.85
styles. Sold up to $6.00..........
Mens' Work Shoes. High Grade of every kind
and style. All have welt soles, $4.45
$6.50 to $8.00 Values.............
Men's House Slippers. Finest Felt in different
styles with Soft or Hard $1.85
Soles, $3.50 Grade ..............
Boy's All Leather Shoes, Weyenberg or Lion
Brand in brown or black calf. $4:00 $2.45
to $5.00 Values, $2.85 and..........$

MIEN'S
RUBBR B OOTS
First Quality, $4.50 Grade
$3.00
LADIES'
RUBBER BOOTS
$3.50 Grade
$.50
LADIES' RUBBERS
First Quality, All Styles
75c
)JEl'S RUBBERS
First Quality, $1.50 Grade
$1.15
BOY'S RUBBERS
First Quality
75c
CHILD'S RUBBERS
Best Grade
50c
BOY'S ONE-BUCKLE
ARCTICS

HIGHEST GRADE

$8.00 to $9.00 Values

Oxfords and Shoes
$14.00 to $15.00 Values, Choice

$4.85

MEN'S SOCKET-FIT

SHOES

$17.85

and' $9.45

MEN'S OXFORDS
Patent and Dull Kid,
Plain Toe, $8.00 Values

$13.50 Values

$8.85

M9ws' Crossett &, alston
LATEST STYLE
Shoes and Oxfords
$8.50 to $12.00 Values go at

$4.85

LADIES'

MEN'S HOUSE

HOUSE SLIPPERS

SLIPPERS

I __

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