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March 17, 1923 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-03-17

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THE WEATHER.
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

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-AL -AL-
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VOL. XXXIII. No. 122

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, (ARCH 17, 1923

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M'ICHIGAN DEBATE
TEAMS WIN BOUTH
AVFIRMATIYE SIDE WINS ('OSEj
ARGUMENTS BY CLEVER
REASD'NIN
INJUNCTION$ USED AS
TOPIC OF ARGUMENT

NET TITLE GOES TO FRANCE
SUZANNE BEATS MOLLA
Nice, March 16-(By A.P.)-
No one could be found tonight
to challenge the right of Suz-
anne to the supreme title of the
women's tennis world.I
After the overwhelming defeat
she administered to the American
champion, Mrs. Malory. 6-0, 6-0,
in the semi-finals of the Nice
tournament today all agreed that
there was no woman likely to de-
throne the French star forsome
time to come.
Mle. Lenglen was magnam-
inous in victory and Mrs. Mal-
lory was dignified and coura-
geous in defeat, and when they
shook hands with apparent cor-
diality after the match both were
given heat-ty applause by the
great crowd of spectators. j

MICHIGAN FAVORED
I'N BIG TEN TRACK
MEETING TONIGHT

Interpretation of Term Proves to Be
Central Pint of Clash In
Argument
'rbana, Ill., larch 16.-ihi-I
gan's negative team won the de-
rl on from Illinois in the, debate
here tonight..
Michigan defeated the University ofC
Wisconsia in the debate held last
night in Hill auditorium by obtaining
the one judge's favorable sdecision.
The contest Was held as one of the
dobates in the eighth annual Mid-
West leagge, the other two debates be-
int held at Madison, Wis., and Urba-
na, Ill., last night, and the question
debated was that of the use of In-
jabctions in the settlement of labor
dlsputes.
The Michigan team which defended
tihe affirmative side of the question
was upheld 'by N. B .Johnson, '25, who
ojnd the debate, L. J. Glasgow, '25,
aid Gerrit Demmnk, '23. Those who
a ke on the negative side and repre-
sente .the University of Wisconsin
Were ltalpb E. Axley, Harold A. Seer-
figk, and Wayne, I Morse.'
United t$tee District Judge Charles
C. Simons, '98, of Detroit, a former
Varsity debater, presided at the de-!
bate and as an introduction to the
contest told of sone of his expei'i-
emces a a Michigan debater at which:
im:e ex-President William Howard
aft.was acting as a judge of a con-
ference debate. Prof. Edmund E. Day
of the economics department acted as
judge of the debate.
The question debated is as follows:
Resolved, .That whatever constitu-
tional or dtatutory changes are neces-
sary to' make impossible the ruse of
injunctions in labor disputes in the:
United States should be immediately'
made. The contest was close, spirited
and proved to be evenly-divided. The
affhimative team upheld their side of

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LONDON AROUSED
BY RUHR ,CRIS~IS
Outcome of Franco-Belgianm Parley
Regarded With Interest by
Diplomats
DISCONTENT D)ISPLIAYED AT
PREMIER'S FOREIGNP OLICY
London, March 16-(By A.P.)-Un-a
diminished anxiety continued to be
shown by the newspapers in their dis.
cussion of the Ruhr situation and the
discontent with the government's pol-
icy which hitherto has been confines'
mainly to liberal and labor organs
now is beginning to be shared by mod-
erate organs, which generally sup-
port the government.
Much curiosity is expressed con-
cerning the outcome of the Franco.
Belgian conference at Brussels. The
common view is that although there
is :much obscurity as to what reall3
happened. at Brussels the conference.
had a moderate influence on M. Poin-
caire, it being said by some that he
found the Belgian statesmen not die-
posed to support extremist FrenchI
views, hence there is a tendency tcy
believe that something may come of]
the negotiation.
The ;weekly outlook thinks' that Pre-
mier Bonar Law's "timid behavior" in;
the matter puts his country in a pre-
carious situation.

ILLINOIS, IOWA, WISCONSIN RE
GARDED AS LIKELY
( ON TENDEINS
S E V E N WOLVERINES
PLACE IN TRIAL HEAT!
I[' tos'4ersa tile Squid in Ymars 'Shoil
S~core in 1F arly Every
" Event
Michigan, represented by the best
rounded team in, many years accord
ing to Coach Farrell, will compete to-
night for honors with 19 entries in thr
thirteenth annual indoor Conference
meet at Evanston. Trial heats wer'
run off late last night in the 440 and
880 in which Reinke, Hattendorff and
Cushing competed for a chance to rur
in the finals of the half mile and Mar-
tin, Joyner, Thomas and Siemons in
the 440.
y 'cli Igain Picked Favorite
The Wolverines enter the meet r:
favorite for first honors if her men de
as well as they have done so far thin
year and if there are no serious up-
sets. Indications are that Michigar
will score in nearly every event for
(1'-vh PFnrrell has always b~een a'
sticker for team balance and from all
indications this year's team is one of
his most characteristic teams.
Illinois, winner of the indoor and
rlofdoor Conference meets last year
will also make a bid for first place
as the Indians have a well rounded
team that is strengthened by severa
strong first class performers. Iowa
and Wisconsin have perhaps the next
strongest teams and should succeed
in taking several points apiece, but
with their unevenly balanced team,
they will not be. able to endanger e-
theim Michigan's or Illinois' chances o,
placin~g first or second.
Northwestern Has Slight Advantage
Northwestern and Chicago hay(
one or two good men each who will
without doubt place in the finals
Krogh of Chicago and Crippen of
Northwestern in the mile are strong
men and will fight for honors in this
evenrt. Crippen is also a good- man iu
the half mile. Hagen also of North-
western is a first class man in the
440 and recently set a new record for
the Evanston gymnasium in this
event. Of course Northwestern will
have a distinct advantage in bein!
able to compete in its own gymnasium'
and can also afford to enter all the
men that it wants to. Chicago and.
Illinois will also take large delegation,
to the meet as they are -not far- fror
the scene of action. Brickman of
Chicago will no doubt place in the
high hurdles.
(Continued on Page Six)

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YOUTH CONCEALS IDENTITY
OF STUDENT LEGISLATOR
"Can you tell me who the
youngest page is'?" an enthusias-
tic Daily reporter asked of a
young man at Hill auditorium
yesterday 'after the Convocation
services. "No, I don't believe I
can," was the reply.
"Well, you are a page?" the re-
porter continued. A faint blush
tinged the face of the young man
-then he broke into a big smile
-"No, I am Representative J. A.
Burns, of Detroit!" - and the
Daily reporter quaintly toppled
off the platform, completely ov-
ercome by "Jimmie's" quiet an-
nouncement.
Representative Burns is 23
years of age and is at present, a
law student at the University of
Detroit.

}

TOUR OF INSIPECTIO
LEGISLATORS I
DA1
VISIT FORMALL'
WITH DINNER
I Burtn, hamIRlton Joi

Y ENDS
AT UNION
ison Speak u#
utchins at

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THRO*NG SPECIL[CIONVOCATIO'N-
EI OHOO VIIIGLG ISLATURE
JOR D UFF SPEAKS IN GOVER1NOR'S9ABSENCE
Y OCIES Regent Joins In PRESIDENT CALLS GROESBECK
DURING GREATEST FRIEND OF
T .?1PYC "to m'4, fN IV\TRST

Lunchieon

r' IMIPIG MEE1T
Minnesota Noed it tby 3 to 30
Score; -ichi a Pices
Sixth
THREE NEW CONFERENCE
RECORDS ESTABLISHED
Chicago, March 16.---Northwestcru
university swimmers splashed their
vray to the Western Conference swim.
'a ing title fin the flarticttgym po001
1 ere tonight taking first rlaes in four
events and copping e2.,xngh further
scores to total 32 points.
Minnesota swimmer3 gave the great
Pur~iie aggr'egation a stifW light 'and
totaled 30,.while Wisco'xshr 'came thire
The greatest spectacle of =hej entirt
thrilling evening. was provided bar
Hubbard when he shattere4 the loijg
standing record for the 159 yard b~art,
stroke.
Northwestern started the evening
record breaking by smashing the ex-
isting Markin,, the relay going the 160
yard distance in 1:19:1,
The Conference and National In-
tercollegiate record in. the 150 yard
back stroke followed, Hubbard going
'the distance in the phenomenal time4
of 1:51 .Hubbard's preference ranks
with the greatest college aquatic, mar-
vels of all time for the former time1
1:52; 2 by Pavlicek of Chicago was,
thought unattainable and has stood
since 1916.
ALUMI ASSOCIATION
SCSSE REPORT

Following a breakfast at 8:30 o'clock
this morning at the Union, the State
legislators began a tour of inspec-
tion which lasted until they assembl-
ed at 11 o'clock for the convocation
at Hill auditorium.
The legislators began their trip by
visiting West hall and University hall
both of which. they inspected from
within. After visiting University hall
the company proceeded by way of
Tappan hall and Martha Cook dormi-
tory to the model high school whirl-
ewas thoroughly inspected.
Faculty Explains Poinits
The group then proceeded to the
Economics building, and then to th<
Zoological museum. The legislators
made the trip In groups of four, anCI
five accompanied by faculty members
who explained points of interest
to them. The body met in front of
Natural Science building shortly af-
ter 11 o'clock and then proceeded t(
hill auditorim where they attendeC
the convocation services.
. utellus Addresses Visitors
T The legislators and the accompany.
ng faucity members met at 12:30o'-
clock 'at the Union where they had a
luncheon at .which PresidentsEmerit
-us H4arry 'Burns" Hutchins spoke or'
the University as an asset to the State
Hie said that; the University had beer
founded and built up by men of vi-
sfon who saw the use of such an in-
stitution, and that every dollar given
to the'cause of the University had been
amply-justified. Il also' pointed-out
some of the' actual benefits of the
University as its 'extension work an<
its laboratory services.
After the luncheon the second in-
spection tour was held in which th,
Medical building, the Dental building
and the hospital buildings were visit-
ed. This tour required the greater
part of the afternoon.
-Women's Part Explained
The legislators met for dinner at f
o'clock at the Union. Short speeches
were given by Thomas E. Johnson
St'ate'superintendent of public instruc-
tion, ind by Dean Jean liamilton. The
SperiAtendent in his speech showed
that intelligent citizenship rested up-
on proper education, and that the pre-
servation of American ideals was al.
so dependent upon the same thing
Dean Hamilton spoke of the woman'r
cart in the University. She spoke of
the 'c men's sororities and thei-
league houses, the' ideals toward whic
they were striving, and in particu
lar the University of Michigan Leaguc
building. Following her talk President
Marion L. Burton summed up a few
of the ideas of the convention witi-
which the meeting disbanded. Fol-
lowing. the dinner many of the legis-
lators , attended the basketball game
while some attended the Michigan-
Wisconsin debate at Hill auditorium
This marked the close of the legis-
lators' visit here.

the question 'by maintaining that theE
th ane e ads of capitalists, 100190NIERMEY[HERE
disputes cannot be eliminated with-
out the abolishment of the injunctioti, ISITINS ROBERTfR0ST.
ald that the civil and criminal law
procedure of.the United States is ade-
quate to handle labor disputes a Louis -Untermeyer, distinguished
The negative team from Wisconsin American poet and critic, who wasI
held that the present system of in-. one of the lecturers on the Whimsies
junctions is just to all parties and I lecture course last year, arrived in
that it acts as a protection to intangi- Ann Arbor late last night. He will
le property rights, that it has sue-stay with Robert Frost, whom he is
led roperty hts that it has su- visiting, during his stay here.
ceeded and its defects are not inhet- Mr. Untermeyer will be the gues'
ent, and that its removal would leave of the Whimsies staff and of the Grad-
no remedy. The real clash of the de- uate English club at a reception to be
bate was centered in the two inter given for him tonight at Helen New-
pretations of the word injunction as berry residence. He may give a read-
viewed by the two sides. ing and short talk after the reception'
On The Trail Of The Lawmakers

";

"Young Tian, this is President Bur-
ton," said the legislator taking hold
of his small page's arm.{
"What was the name, my boy? WellI
V~p very glad to meet you," said the
'resident as he shook hands with the
bo) .
"... Gee, lie's a big man, aint he?"'
-M -.-
At the University of Michigan league
booth in University hall one of the
inspecting' parties stopped. Repre-
sontative Culver said, "Boys, here arc
the girls earning'their own building!
Let's buytthem a brick," and digging
deep, he produced money enough tc
buy gumdrops for thelwhole crowd.
Arthur Qualey, 12, of Lausing, is the
youngest page in the legislative par-
ty. Ile attends the seventh grade of
'rammar school.
-C - M -- oG
Senater tlharles R, Sligh, of Grand

Rapids, has recently given the new
$300,000 memorial hospital to Grand
I Rapids. Mr. Sligh originated the cor-
poration franchise fee amendment, al-
so he introduced the bill to limit in-
heritace to one million dollars.
-- M
Joseph E. Warner, of Ypsilanti, was
originator of this year's gas tax bill.
----
"Jimmie" Green, 16, is the oldest
page in the legislature. He is from
Alpena, a sophomore in high school
This is his second term in the legis-
lature.
One of the visitors remarked whilec
inspecting Tappan hall, "Why this it
worse than the country school ir
which I attended school. We would-
I n't think of sending children in the
I country to such buildings for their ed-
ucation. Such poor light, such bad
air-think of the teachers who stay
in these rooms all day and we expect
them to train the future teachers of
the generation."
Another said of West hall on climb-
ing the stairs, "Don't need any band
with these stairs here, do they? This
is the third time I have risked my
neck going up here."
-- M
Inspecting the Museum, on being

YOST PREENS IUMNI
CUP TO CHAMPION TEAM11
(Special to The Daily)
F St. Louis, Mo., March 16.-Coach'
Fielding H. Yost, athletic director of
the University of Michigan, presentedt
the Michigan Alumni basketball cupE
to the championship team of the cityt
here yesterday at the Odeon theater
before a crowd of 3,000 high school
students.
During the ceremony the band play-
ed "The Victors" and "Varsity" andE
at the end of the program the entire
assemblage sang the "Yellow and
Blue." The theater was decorated with
IMichigan flags and pennants.
Six of the ten executives of the
St. Louis high schools are Michigan
graduates. They, with the Alumni as-k
sociation, have entertained Coach Yost
with banquets and gatherings since hisj
arrival here. Yesterday afternoon he
met with the teams and coaches. Cal-2
Ian is the coach of the Central hight
school winning team, Stephen A. Doug-;
las, '99, is principle of Central highl
school, and William C. Swartout, '02,
is president of the Alumni association.
The coach leaves for Chicago tomor-
Erou . }
No CONTAGIOUS DISESES,
MENACE STUDNT HEALTH
"At present there are no cases of
serious contagious diseases among
students at the University," Dr. Floydk
M. Allen, of the Health service, said
yesterday. This is considered an ex-
cellent record by physicians.
"In fact student health has been ex-;
ceptionally good this year," Dr. Allen;
continued. "Since the beginning of
the school -year we have had no serious
1niA pnir,' ha1v nrlA thr. 14cs ifnof, . n, -

tomnparison. ox the MIChi1gan- Atun-
ni association with signilar organ ia-
tions. in other schools .and suggestions
for improvement.of Michigan's alum-
ni orga'nization are included in the
report on alumni organization recent-
ly published. The report is the work
of Paul A. Leidy, '09, and Wilfred B.
Shaw, '04.
-The general conclusions from the
material gathered from other schools,
some of which Is first presented, arq,
that the active interest of the alumni
is more important than the form of
organization, that in no other insti-
tution does the alumni publication.
support the work of the. alumni as-
sociation, and that a constructive pro-
gram including more than mere finan-
cial support of the University is nec-
essary.

FOER STRUDET WiLL i1RESS CLUBR EASTAL
ADDRHESS MILE. G LASS ON FAMOUS JOURNAISTS
Robert J. McCa dliss, '21M, wil ?CNITT, '04, DESCRIBES MANY
speak at 7 o'clock tonight at the r PERSONALITIES IN NEWS-
meetin& of the Upper Room Bible PAPER FIELD.
class. NMcCandliss .is a missionary tc '-
China from the Presbyterian Young j Spe-king before an audience con-
Peoples' society of the University and {psed almost entirely of journalistic
is here for the Student Volunteer mis- students, Virgil V. McNitt, '04, man.
sionary convention. ager of the McNaught Newspaper
Prof. John E. Kirkpatrick, of the syndicate of New York city and of the
political science department, wil talk Central Press association of Cleve-
and Dr. Thomas Iden, of the Ann Ar- land, told of the many interesting -per-
bor Bible chair and head of the class .sonalities he had become associated
will give the history of the organiza- with in the world of Journalism since
tion which was founded by him U his graduation from the University.
years ago, ,He first enumerated the outstand-
ing America.n editors of the day,. tell-
ing of their eccentricities and charac-
teristics as he himself had seen them
K d"" Then passing on to the mostdisting-
Lone Kid uished correspondents, columnist
jIand humorists, he concluded his tall
with a brief characterization of one
of the foremost English publishers,
has a "light" occupation of "up' Mr. McNitt, who has given several
per" merit all his own, that be talks to students of journalism during
does not care to advertise for the past few years, was brought to the
a "timely" reason, but others, University, again, under the auspices
of the Ppess club.
desiring wide publicity, use

" ;

SEATS SELL RAPIDLY FO,
19T11 JUNIOR GIRLS. PLAY
Because the nineteenth annual
junior Girls' play, "Jane Climbs
A Mountain", is to be ipen to the
general public this year, there
is a large increase in the sale of
tickets, and a fifth performance
of the production, the evening of
March 24, may be necessary.
No more applications for tick-
ets scheduled to be given March
21, 22, 23 and the afternoon of the

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told that a number of extremely valu-
able specimens were stored in the
elevator shaft, one declared that "he
would see that shaft before leaving
'the building." Many of the parties
expressed much feeling that such r
i coilection shoAhI avet ibe ho usaA

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