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March 10, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-03-10

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
TODAY

it i&4Ia

AjW

NAME IT
FOR YOST
TODA Y

VOL. XXXIII. No. 116

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, 1923

EIGHT PAGES

(sdale Hea

--- ---

EISAT DUE
HIERE THURSDAYN
BUILDING TOURll
SURVEY OF BUI1DING PROGRAM
TO BEGIN ON FRIDAY
MORNING
ENTERTAINMENT FOR
V I S 1 TORS PLANNED
Convocation Scheduled for Thursday
Morning; 11 o'clock Classes
Suspended
Lansing; March 9-(By A.P.)-em--
hers of both houses of the legislature
will visit the University of Michigan
Thursday and Friday, March 15 and
46, it was announced here today.
This action followed the acceptance
of both houses this week of an invi-
tation from President Marion L. Bur-
ton of the university to visit and in-
spect the institution at the expense
of a group of unnamed alumni.
According to the plans of the joint
house and senate committee appointed
to make arrangements and set a day
for the eyent, a session will probably
be held here Thursday morning, after
which both houses will journey to Ann
Arbor, remaining there probably until
Friday night.
Preident Marion L. Burton will
address the visiting members of the
legislature next Friday morning in
an assembly at the Union, which will
be the most important event of the
two "day visit of the legislature here.
President Burton will present the at-
titude of the University on the build-
ing program. It is expected that this
meeting- between the President and the
legislators and the subsequent in-
spection of old and new buildings on
the campus will have an important
bearing when the two houses take a
final vote on University appropria- I
tionts.
The junket which will come here a
the expense of alumni will arrive in
Ann Arbor late Thursday afternoon
and will not begin its inspection of
the University until Friday morning.
Thursday evening, after a dinner at
te Union, an atletic program will
he given for the visitors, in Waterman
igyrnasium.
Lnion Minner Concludes Program
On Friday morning, after the as-
sembly at the Union and the inspec-
tion tour, a University Convocation
will be held in Hill auditorium. The
f Convocation has been authorized b-)
the deans, and all classes during the
eleven o'clock hour will be suspend-
ed. -
In the afternoon the inspection of
construction work on the campus will
continue. The program for the leg-
islators will be concluded with a din-,
ner Friday evening at the Union.
Organizations to Assist
The Exchange club, an association
-of local business men, has volunteered
Its assistance in the entertainment of I
the visitors. Other city organiza-
tions will be asked to cooperate, as!
well as the Student council and the
Women's League.,
The committee in charge of the pro-
gram is composed of Sec. Shirley W.
Smith, chairman, Dean Edward I .
Kraus of the Summer session, Frank
H. Robbins, assistant to the Presi-,
dent, Robert Campbell, treasurer of
the University, Prof. Lewis M.dGra,
of the Engineering college, and Paul ,
vickley,assistant secretary of th
University.

I

STATISTICIANS CONPILE j
H I LIST OF P11I BETA KAPPA
Dr. Oscar Mi. Voorhees and hisE
Istaff have just completed the
Icompilation of a national (direct-
ory containing the names of more
I than 60,000 members of the Phi
SBeta. Kappa fraternity.
This book contains the names
I arranged by chapters, by geo-
graphical location, and also al-I
phabetically. It contains every
member since the founding of the
I fraternity in 1776. More than
45,000 of those listed are still
alive.
Copies of the directory can be
secured from the national secre-
tary at 145 West 55th St., New1
I York City.
TURKISH REPLY TO
ALLIES DELIRE
Angora Government Sends Note to'
Ihig Commissioners Expressing
Views on Treaty
SUGGEST ADDITIONAL
PEACE NEGOTIATIONSj

FRENCH TIGHTEN
GRIP ON RUHR IN
FRESH ADVA9CES
RIlE INDAU H1ARBOR, ELDERFIEL
OCCUPIED, TIE S MOVE
ON RREINIAU,
RUMORS OF BRITISH
PROTEST PROVE FALSE

Hit

sdĀ° e Head OKAUN
To Address Guild
BANQUET ATTRACTS
-, HUG8E GATHERING

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MORE THAN 1200 GRADS ATTE:
ANNUAL AFFAIR AT H10.
TEL COMMODORE

ND)

lPoixicalre Shows IDetermjinationi
iYreseiitiig~ Situation to
D~eputies

in

Berlin, March 9-(By A.P.)-A dis-'
Ipatch from Mannheim reports that the!
French have occupied Rheinau Har-,
bor, on the Rhine, in Lower Alsace,
and are marching on Rheinau, a sub-
urb of Mannheim.
It is also reported that the French
have occupied the railway station of
Dornap, near Elberfeld.
According to the Berlin newspapers
all the German trade unions in the
Ttuhr have refused the demand of the
occupation authorities to hanl over
to them a list of the trades union mem-

Constantinople, March 9--(By A. P.) berships.
-The Turkish government's reply to .
the allied peace proposal arrived here Berlin, March 9--(Py A.P.)-Kron-
from Angora this afternoon an d wa.; enbeig, 3 1-2 miles southwest of Elder-
handed to the British, French and ;cFld,was taken over by the forces of
Italian high commissioners. Copies occupation this morning according to
will also be delivered to the American .omcaie .tere
and Japanese representatives. Paris, March 9-(By A.P.)-Premier
The note says there are no funda- ,oincaire today addressed the for-
mental modifications proposed in the eign relations committee on the sub-
political clausos of the draft treaty. ject of the Ruhr situation. The pre-
Turkey, however, desires sovereignty mier went into detail with regard to.
of Castelorieza (off the south coast the Ruhr railroads, the organization
of Asia Minor) and a small island de- of the customs, the putting into force
pendent upon Tene-dos Islands (off the of import and export licenses, the ha-
west coast of Asia Minor). She also ison established between the bridge'
suggests the Maritza river "Thalweig" head, the relations between the occu-
(lowest point of the valley) as the pation troops and the population, and
frontier of Thrace rather than the the arrangements for the delivery ofI
right bank of the river. coal and coke to France.
Regarding the economic clausef of 1 ns Poincaire renewed his declara-
the treaty the note proposes that tions made before the Chamber of
clauses 71 to 117 upon which an Deputies that France would not ac-,
agreement has not been reached cept any mediation nor enter into in-
bgr entdhisoindro e rafdirect conversation. I-e added, how-
should be disjoined from the draft ever, that the day Germany under-
and subrequently discussed. stood the situation, France would be
Part four of the treaty dealing with ready to listen.
communications and sanitary ques- In any case the Premier declared1
tions is accepted with slight modifi- France could not abandon the secur-
cations. Part five dealing with pris- ities- and' guarantees she had been
oners of war is integrally accepted. forced to take in return for a simple
Apuregards a regime for foreigners promise from Germany.
in Turkey the note suggests that the
title of this section should read "Con- Essen, March 9-(By A. P.)-TheI
vention ofsRegulation Betwen Turkey disarming and expulsion of the Secur-
and the Allied Powers" and insists onI ity Police at Dortmund completes the
the same prerogatives for Turkish disarmament and dissolution of the
subjects in allied states as for for- police bodies throughout the Ruhr.,
cigners in Turkey. Only certain towns now have civic
police, who are virtually mere watch-
PRESBYTERIANS TO 11011) imen,
SECTIONAL PARTY TONIGHT The French troops have again been
withdrawn. The city was searched by
A meeting for all students from the French soldiers and 270 security1
Grand Rapids or any part of Michi- police were arrested and expelled with.
gan south of that city will be held at a warning not to return.
the Presbyterian church tonight at 8 N Official Protest -
o'clock. London March 9-(By A.P.)--It has
This is the first of a series of sec- Loeen reported that the British govern
tional parties to be given under the beensreormatlyeprtsheon-a
auspices of the Presbyterian Young ment has formally protested on legal
Peoples Society to students from the :grounts against the French occupa-
state of Michigan. The state has been tion of territories between the Rhine
divided into several sections and a ;bridgeheads.
meeting is planned every Frdiay for' , It ishlearned authoritatively, how-
one of these groups. Once a month me r uthat no formal protest has been
it is planned to. hold agera as- Imade, but only verbal representationst
setbly of all theso geeral through diplomatic channels, pointing
s-. yt. ]{# .lise- +nr fnrnli .it

Dr. William Gear Spencer
Dr. William G. Spencer, president
of Hillsdale college and graduate of
the Sorbonne University of Paris in
classical languages will give an ad-
dress on "Jesus The Thinker" at the
Baptist Guild banquet tonight.
PROPOSE CHANGS
IN CONSTITUTION
Investigation Cimmittee of Sente
Body Recommends Revisions to
Student Council
MEMBERSHIP AND ELECTIONS
AFFECTED BY ALTERATIONS
Following are the changes in the
constitution of the Student council
which -have been recommended by an
investigating committee of the Senate
council. They are being submitted to
the campus by request of the Student
council prior to its detailed discussion
of them at a special meeting to be
held Sunday morning.
A meeting of upperclassmen is be-
ing planned for next week at which
time the changes will be submitted
to the student body for discussion be-
fore they are approved and reported
back to the investigating committee.
MEMBERSHIP OF THE COUNCIL
The Student council shall consist
of nine members to be elected from
the campus at large, and three ex-of-
ficio members. In the event that the
president shall be elected other than
from the pensonnel of the council, the
council shall consist of 13 mem'bers.
The ex-ofiicio members shall be the
president of the Michigan Union, the,
editor of The Michigan Daily, and the
captain of the football team, to serve
only during the year that they shall
actively hold these offices. No ex-
officio members shall hold any office
of the council.
Of the 9 elected members, 6 nem-
hers are to be chosen each year, 3 of
whom shall serve a one year term
andl 3 a two year term. Any man on
the campus shall be eligible to elec-
tion..
Elections to vacancies shall be byI
vote of the Student council. Nomina-
tions to vacancies shall be made by
the nc-mination committee in the man-
ner hereinafter provided for nomina-
tions. Members so elected shallserve
for the balance of the term so vacat-
ed. Notice of an election to fill va-
cancies shall be given at the preced-R
ing meeting.
MANNER OF NOMINATION AND
ELECTION{
The body for nomination of elec-
tive members shall be composed of
the three ex-officio members and the
president, vice-president and the sec-
retary of the council.
Twice as many shall be nominatd as
are to be elected. Any member of the
council shall have a right to place
any name or names on the list to be
considered. The noinating committee
shall then determine how many men
(Continued on Page Two)

MANY PROMINENT MEN
GIVE TALKS AT DINNER
Samuel McRoberts, '93L, Acts as
Toastmaster; Burton, Wenley
Address Meeting
(Special to The Daily)
New York, March 9.-More than
1200 University of Michigan alumni at-
tended the annual banquet of the New
York Alumni Association held here to-
night at the Hotel Commodore. Presi-
dent Marion L. Burton, and Prof. Rob-
ert M. Wenley, of the philosophy de-
partment of the University spoke.
Samuel McRoberts, '93L, president of
the Metropolitan Trust company, and
chairman of the finance committee of
Armour and company, was toastmas-
ter.
Some of the oher speakers of the
evening included William L. Day, Jr.,
'OOL, former Federal judge, the young-
est Federal judge in the United States
at the time of his appointment; Wil-
liam Henry King, '87L, United States
Senator from Utah; and George Sis-
er, '15E, one of the most famous ball
players of all time.
Among the other distinguished
guests were United States Senator
Copeland, '8911. Med, Earl D. Babst,
president of the American Sugar Re-
fining company, William A. Starrett,
of Thonpson-Starrett, construction
contractors, Milton H. Freeman, '03E,
assistant engineer of the New York
and New Jersey Vehicular tunnel, R.
L. Bigelow, '5E, president of the Bige-
low State bank, Jeremiah W. Jenks,
'78L, of New York University. who
spoke last year in Hill auditorium, S.
Wright Dunning, '60L, James D. liar-
ry, vice-president of the Metropolitan
Life Insurance company, and Regent
Junius E. Beal, '82L.
FATHER'S DAY PLANS
NEAINGCOMPLETION
Father's Day the present name of
which has been changed from Dad's
Day will be held May 12 under the di-
rection of the Union. President Mar-
ion L. Burton will speak at the ban-
quet Saturday evening at the Union
which is to mark the close of the cele-
bration.
While Saturday, May 12, is the day
especially set for the observance of
ithe fathers, a number of events will
take place the preceding day planned
for the occasion. The annual tug-of-
war between the sophomores and
freshmen will be held Friday after-
noon, and that evening will be held
special vaudeville at the Mimes thea-
ter in honor of the fathers.
The spring gamer will be held Sal-
urday morning on Ferry field, while
the Michigan-Illinois track meet will
be held during the afte-noon. The
banquet in honor of the parents will
be held in the evening. Fathers may
visit classes on both days. Campus
guides will be furnished for the
guests at any time Friday.}
The committee to have charge of
arrangements for the celebration, has
the following members: John P. Law-
ton , '24, Wallace Flower, '24, Harry
C. Clark, '24, Milton Peterson, '25,
Robert Hummer, '25, Franklin Dick-
man, '25E, and Arden Kireshner, '24.
The fathers will be housed at the
fraternities, the Union, and at rooms
which the committee is to secure from
Ann Arbor residents for the week-
end.
NEW ECONOMICS HEAD
WILL ADDESS SMOKR
ROYAL TERRACE ORCHESTRA ,AND
VARSITY QUARTETTE ALSO.
ON PROGRAM

Prof. Edmund Day, who has recent-
ly been appointed head of the econom-
ics department, will*'be the principal
speaker at the all-campus economic
smoker, at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday ev-
ening in the Upper Reading room ,o
the Union. This will be Prof. Day's
first public task. His subject will be
"Business as a Profession".
The entertainment for the evening
will cnnsist ofs evera1 slections bv

,k
HARVEY ON NOTE
' English' Earl Presents Graceful Reply
To Amibassador's Ob.
jeetions
U[ES TACT IN DECLARING
MATTER SOULD BE DROPPED
London, March 9-(By A.P.)-The
Earl of Balfour yesterday delivered
his reply to the strictures Ambassador
Harvey passed on his famous note to
the former Allies on the subject of
inter-allied debts. Lord Balfour spoke
in the calm and almost unmoved at-
mosphere customary in the House of
Lords.
Speaks Tactfully
Lord Balfour took unusual care in,
the explanation, fortifying himself
with copious notes and thus signal-
izing his recognition of the delicacy of
the task.:Ie dealt gracefully- andtact-
fully with the subject, to leave no H
rankling behind.
. Saying that when the note was or-
iginally prepared it .was dealing with}
"the most difficult, the most danger-
ous and the most anxious question ofj
international ifldebtedness," lie quoted
the passage Ambassador Harvey ob-
1jected to as follows:
"Thie United States insisted, in sub-
stance, if not in form, that though oui
allies were to spend the money it was
only on our security that they wer;
prepared to lend it."
Seeks to Correct Error
Lord Balfour opened his remarks
with an expression of the belief that
I considering momentous changes since
his note was penned, it would have
been preferable to allow the matter
to rest, but he thought the House
would agree that when a person in the
high position of Ambassador Harvey
publicly expressed the desire that the
present British government should
formally and explicitly remove misap--
prehension, silence on his part would
lead to a misunderstanding.I
New York, March 9-(By A.P.)-
Oscar T. Crosby, assistant Secretary
of the Treasury during the war, char-
; acterized today as "misapprehension"
the assertion of Lord Balfour yester-
lay in the House of Lords that the
United States had demanded a Brit-
ish guarantee before financing the
other Allies.I
PARONS SELECTED FOR
1925 SOPHOMORE POM
Patrons and patronesses for the
Sophomore ,Prom, which is to be held
March 23 at the Union, have been nam-
ed. Arrangements for dance pro-
grams in class colors, maroon and
white, for the luncheon and for the
music have also been made.
The patrons and patronesses are:
President Marion L. Burtonand Mrs.
Burton, Dean Joseph A. Bursley and
Mrs. Bursley, Dean John R. Effinger
and Mrs. Effinger, Dean Henry M.'
Bates and Mrs. Bates, Dean William R.
Humphreys and Mrs. Humphreys,
- Dean Jean Hamilton, Coach Fielding
H. Yost and Mrs. Yost, Coach George -
E. Little and Mrs. Little, Prof. Robert
M. Wenley and Mrs. Wenley, Prof.
Charles B. Vibbert and Mrs. Vibbert,
Prof. George W. Patterson and Mrs.
Patterson, Prof. Peter Field and Mrs.
Field, Prof. Emil Lorch and Mrs.

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.THREE RECORDS CRASH
WHEN TALE MEETS PENN
New Hlaven, Conn., March 9-
(By A.P.)-Two world's records
and one intercollegiate record
were b~roken here tonight by thej
Yale swimming team in a meets
jwith Pennsylvania, which Yale
won. 45 to 9.
In the 250 yard relay the Blue
five man team established a new I
orld 's record, swimming the
distance in 2 minutes-4 secondsI
their own previous record being
2 minutes 4 3-5 seconds.
A second world's record was
broken when the Yale six man
team swam the 300 yard relay in
2 minutes 30 3-5 seconds, break-
ing their own record of 2 min-
utes, 31 2-5 seconds.
Eddie Bench of Yale made a
new intercollegiate record in the
200 yard breast stroke swimming
the distance in 2 minutes, 57 2-5
seconds.

PRICE FIVE CENTS
BOARD1 TO ACT O
"NAME IT YOST"
PETITIONS TODAY
M OVE IVENT IN ITIA TED BY ST IU.
DENT COUNCIL UNIVERSALLY.
PRAISED
ALUMNI AND FACULTY
MEMBERS ENDORSE PLAN
Letters Of. Approval Received From
Ferris, Groesbeck, White
and Day
Action on the part of the Board in
Control of Athletics to name the new
field house after Coach Fielding H.
Yost will be taken today. A commit-
tee from the Student council will pre-
sent its petition for the dedication of
the new plant before the board which
meets at 12:30 o'clock this afternoon
The petition may be acted upon by the
board immediately or plaed on the
table for further discussion.
The presentation of the petition
follows the receipt of hundreds of
petitions that have been submitted by
students, faculty members, and alum-
ni throughout the country to the
council asking that the new home of
Michigan athletics be named after the
"Old Man".
Detroit Responds
Practically every active alumni as-
sociation in the country has passed
resolutions or its members set i
dividual recommendationss favbring
the suggestion. This includes .:the
larger alumni organizations of .New
York, Chicago, Detroit and as- far
west as Seattle and -Portland, and all
of the smaller bodies as well.
The first action taken by alumni
was by the Detroit group on Jan..24,
just five days after the campaign had
been inaugurated by the Student
council and petitions circulated. The
Detroit alumni resolution gives as its
reasons why the field house should be
named after Yost the following main
points:
"That Coach Yost is the most prom-
inent figure connectsi 4 /itlic l, giatte
athletics in the United States today;
that his followers have long sought
for a means of showing their appre-
ciation of his varied services; and
that it was due to his efforts: that the
new field house was conceived -and- is
being built."
Prominent Alumni Approve
Other alumni organizations passed
resolutions more or less a-long this
same line all praising Yost as the Oe
logical choice for the honor. Many
letters have been received from men
well known in public affairs all en-
dorsing the same opinion. Some of
these were from William R. Day, '70,
former justice of the United States
Supreme court, Senator Woodbridge
N. Ferris, Regent Junius E. Beal, '82,
Regent James O. Murfin, '95, 'Gov.
Alexander J. Gtoesbeck, '93, and
Steward Edward White, '95.
A recent letter from E. J; Ottaway,
'94, president of the Port Huron times
Herald, expresses, in the eyes of the
council, the representative attitude of
the great majority of thousands of
Michigan men and women, undergrad-
nates and alumni. The letter reads
as follows:
"I have let my mind run over the
years of athletic history since my day
at the University and I cannot thi-k
of any name that means so much In
athletics rs the name of Yost, n t

only for athletics in general but for a
very high type of athletic standard,
personally among the ' students he
trains and generally in - connection
with the University athletic program.
I have tried to think of some of the
outstanding athletic stars whose name
might be used. I can think of sev-
eral whose names have meant very,
much in Michigan athletic history and
whose achievements since leaving the
University, in peace and war, :;have
led us to think more and more of
them as the years have gone by, and
yet in spite of this, my conviction is
that the nanie of Yost should take
precedence of all others."
ALPHA NU DEBATES 0-N WORLD
COURT PLANS OF PRESIDENTU
Alpha Nu debating society held its
regular weekly debate last night in
the club rooms in University hall. The
subject was "Resolved..that the Unit-
ed States should eater the World
Court as proposed by President Hard-
ing".
Plans were discussed for a. closed
meeting on March 16, at -which time
the freshmen members of the society
will present the negative side of the
question "Resolved, that the presiden-

jout the diffcul ties createa tar the 1)1
ish au,,thorities in the Rhineland.

I 1
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Maier And Paltison Charmr ota
Troops to ty
In Nsovef Two-Piano Concert D ,March
France will not release her present
- .hold on the Ruhr. This was the reply
of Gen. Degoutte, the French come-
By Edgar I. Ades - Harold Bauer's arrangement of the mand', mlade in atstatementh to til
A decidedly entertaining addition to Bach Fantasie and Fugue in A minor newspaper men in answer to Chan--
the novelties of the current musical which opened the program conserva- cellor Cno's address before the Reich
seasn w~ th reita xvih a senis he a-sstag ?Monday.
season was the two-piano recital with tively, as seems the fashion, was German resistance, Gen. Degoutte
which Guy Maier and Lee Pattison played with a nobility which imme- declared, had only fortified France in
nade their local debut and concluded 1 diately dispelled all doubts as to thel her struggle in the Ruhr, and he pre-
the Choral Union concert series la-st us.dicted that soon the French and Bel-"
tmusical insight of the pianists. To us, gian economic blockade would begin
night in Hill auditorium. Unique in the most beautiful feature of the con- to bear fruit.
the field which they are rapidly pop- cert was the interpretation of
ularizing, their art possesses the su- Franck's Prelude, Fugue and Varia- MCPEEK NOMINATED
perior merit of rare musical distinc- tion, which followed. This is music 'TO BENCH A
tion--a fact which was recognized by to live with and at each hearing to ,
a.n audience generous in appreciation derive some hitherto unrealized de-
and applause. I light. Its rich melodic beauty, lofty Word has been received here of the
At once the most obvious and the style and strong reposefulness were nomination of Roy McPeek, '00 of
most penetrating comment upon the disclosed with entrancing effect. In Charlotte, as circuit judge, to succeed
pianism of Me,,--rs. Maier and Pattison Saint-Saenas graceful Scherzo, Op. ; Judge Clement Smith, deceased. Mc-
is that it represents the acme of per- 87 and his Variations on a theme by Peek carried the Republican vote by
fection- in ensemble playing. Both Beethoven more spectacular qualities an overwhelming majority, and as
men are artists of high rank whose were exploited-a dazzling technique, there is no Democrat nominee oppos-
long and dili&nt practice together has admirable rhythmic sense and fascin- ing him, h-is election is assured.
so effectively blended their individual ating elan, With the death of Judge Smith con-
virtues that their two pianos speak as Alfredo Casella's "Pupazetti" suite, ing just before the primary election
one. Every measure of their per- though ultra-modern, is not an at- the serving of the reiainder of his
formance was imbued with zestful vi- tack upon the ears, but it 'was an at- term falls to MePeek. after which he
tality, a tone of crystalline clarity, an tack upon our sense of the ludicrous will begin his own six year term.
..... , . ,,,.-.-

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Do You Know
that there a fe wpeople on this
campus that still do not realize
the extent of or the number of
people reached through the
Daily's Classified service? We -

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Lorch, Prof. Evans Holbrook and
Mrs. Holbrook, Prof. Louis A. Strauss
and Mrs. Strauss, and Prof. Rollo E.,
McCotter and Mrs. McCotter.

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