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October 05, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAIR AMY
COOLER TODAY,

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41

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13.

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VOL. XXXI1I. No. 10

TWELVE PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1922

TWELVE PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

BORDEN TO OPEN
LECTURE COURSE
TOMORROW NIGSHT
FORMER PREMIER OF CANADA
HAS FINE POLITICAL
REWORD
HAS LED COLONY'S BAR
OVER TWENTY YEARS

VETS FORMULATE PLANS
tembership Reorganie d at Meeting
I ast Night in Union
Reorga'iization of membership and
formulation of plans for the goming
year were accomplished by the Rich-
ard N. Hall post, Veterans of Foreign
Wars, at its first meeting last night in
the Union ree ding room.
The post went on record as in fav-
or of continuing the function of the
Memorial committee among ex-service
men on the campus. The balance
of the money left over after the 'Mil-
itary ball was turned ever ,to this
committee to be used toward comple-
tion of the upper reading rooni ii the
Union as a memorial to the soldier
dead. It has been deposited In the
University treasurer's office as a
temporary loan fund for ex-service
men, with the idea that it may be en-
larged in the future as the Richard
N. Hall Memorial Loan fund.
Stanley Lasha, '24E, was appointed
chairman of the committee in charge
of the Armistice day program.
TRADITIONS NI6 HT
TO0,BE O CT,12

Ill-Fated Ship Returns

Wilt DisCUss
Peoples

Politics of English
in 11111 AudItorium
Friday

First, at least in point of time,
among the. 10 speakers on the pro-
gram of the Oratorical association is
Sir Robert Borden, former premier of
Canada, who will speak at 8 o'clock
tomorrow night in Hill Auditorium.
Borden's topic is "Political Develop-
ment of the English Speaking
Peoples." The ex-premier is an au-
thority in this field, having lived
through many of the phases of polit-
ical rearrangement which he will take
Started in 1878
Borden was for many years one of
the leading politicians and states-
' men of Canada, starting his career at
the bar in 1878. Since that time he
has developed one of the most exten-
sive law practices in Canada. During
the war through his activities in the
struggle he attained fame In world
politics. Shortly after the outbreak
of the great war, Sir Robert Borden
took a leading part in raising the con-
tingents of Canadian soldiers and in
filling the various quotas.
In July, 1914, Borden attended the
meeting of the British Cabinet, the
first overseas man to receive such a
summons. In 1917 and 1918 he rep-
resented Canada in the Imperial War
council and at thetsame time was en-
gaged In the meetings of the Imper-
ial War conference. During 1919 he
came to Paris as chief plenipotentiary
delegato from Canada.
Secured Conscription
His outstanding achievement, how-
ever, was his great work of effecting
the passage and enforcement of the
Canadian conscription measure. Al-
though he had to encounter strong op-
position, Borden was successful in se-
curing the. passage of the bill and
thus he assured Canada the fullest
utilization of her man-power re-j
sources.
Although tickets for the lecture;
course are going rapidly, there areI
still good seats available; The reserv-
ed seat course tickets are $3, while
those for the season in the unreservedI
section of Hill auditorium are $2.50.
Single admissions to Borden's lecture1
tomorrow night are $1.00. Tickets
may be obtained at the State Street'
bookstores and at Hill Auditorium1
box office Friday night befort the lec-1
turc.'
FRESHTRADITION
Y
the e fxecto fMcigntaiin
Underclass Conduct Committee Now
Ready to Function With Fll
Personnel
REFRACTIONS TO BE HANDLED ,
By NEW BODY OF SOPHOMOIRES
Freshmen who are delinquent in
the execution of Michigan traditions
are to be reported to any membersof
the Underclass Conduct committet for '
discipline. , All reports of this nature '
-must be written and signed by the
person making the carges in order
that the committee may investigate
fuly before any action As taken.
Anyone of- the following members
of the committee wil receive the re-
ports: L. C. Becker, 1511 Washten-
aw, tel. 1399, C. Bird, 1437 Washten-
aw, 319, L. Coleman, 15052S.7Univer-
sity, 2763R, J. Collison, 2107 Wash-t
tenaw, 566, C. C. Davidson, 620 S.
State, 231, C. S. Hough, 1404 Wash-
tenaw, 343, W. Kerr, 604 S. State, 371,
C. C. Kresback 608 E. Madison, 1366,
E. P. Lehman, 1021 Hill, 1298R, R.
Moody, 536 Hill, 409W, J. Murry, 1315
Hill, 1460, K. L. Patterson, 707 Ox-1
ford Road, 357, E. Seeley, 604 E. Madi-
son, 1328, H. Steger, 512 S. State, 120,
D. M. Sutter, 1331 Hill, 33, G. Van-
derhouf, 315 Monroe, 2106W, E. Van-
derneen, 314 N. Ingalls, 2220, V. E.f
Warney, 1003 E. Huron, 909, W. C.
Williamson, 603 S. State, 783.-

The officers of ,the committee for
this year are: D. M. Sutter, chairman,
C. Bird, lit. vice chairman, W. Kerr,
eng. vice , chairman, G. Vapderhoof,1
secretary.
ai
Cheerleaders to Meet Tdoay
All prospective cheer leaders and

rI:: t: .: .. .. .*... .. ... .. .....it. .

Antarctic Ship "T4 Quest"
The late Sir Ernest Shakleton's ex-pedition ship, "The Quest," on whichthe great explorer died
Georgiasin the Antarctic, arriving atCawsand Bay, Plymouth, after an ab-sence of over a 'year. The
sel experienced great ill luck fromthe start, but it is stated that satis-factory scientific research
carried out.

at South
little ves-
has been

1

Student

Council Plans Track
to Be Held at Same
Time

Rally

REGENTS GRANT PERMANENT
OFFICES IN U. HALL TO BODY
Traditions night was decided for
Thursday, Oct. 12, at the meeting of
the Student council held last night at
the Union. This action was taken fol-
lowing a motion to postpone the event
which had been scheduled for to-
morrow ;night. Reasons given for
settinghthetmeeting a week ahead
were that the first date would give
little time for preparation,and, In
the opinion of the council, the event
was of too much importance to be
arranged hastily.
It was decided at the meeting to
bring up the track situation at the
Traditions night meeting and to urge
general student participation and in-
terest in this brnch of athletics
Report was made that a new and
permanent office had been granted to
the Student council by the .Board of
Regents of. the University. This of-
flee will be located on the .second
floor of University hall and definite
hours for all the officers of the coun-
cil will be announced. A motion to
send a letter of thanks to President
Marion L. Burton was passed unani-
mously. In commenting on the estab-
lishment of the new office, Vernon F.
Hillery, '23, president of the eQuncil,
said, "The work of the council will
be greatly facilitated, records may be
kept from year to year, and the
council memgers wil be better able
to handle the duties which have great-
ly increased with the growth of the
student body."
A committee was appointed to ob-
tain a report from. the J-Hop commit-
tee otlast year in order that a report
of their activities and their disposi-
tion of funds may be made public to
the campus.
A committee was appointed to che.ck
up on students misrepresenting .the-
number .of years that they have been
on the campus to the Athletic asso-
ciation for the purpose of getting
better seats at athletic contests. It
was brought to the attention of the
members that many such cases had
come up recently.
Election of council officers was the
final business of the meeting. Thomas
Lynch, '25L, was named vice-presi-
dent;Walter Scherer, '24, secretary;
J. Polhamus, '24E, treasurer; and
Herold Hunt, '23Ed, corresponding
secretary. .
NORTHERN FOREST IRES
THREATENDESTRUCTION
Duluth, Oct. 4.-Northern Minneso-
ta's forest area today continued a veri-
table sea of sombre colored smoke,
dotted with fires, some under comtrol,
some admittedly beyond control and
the whole threatening further wide-
spread destruction at the slightest pro-
vocation of the elements.
In St. Louis county alone there were
105 fires, according to latest reports
from Adjutant Gen. Walter F. Rhinow,
who is co-operating with, the forestry
department in the fire zone,
A call for help was sent last night
from Vineland, near Onamia where it
was declared the fire was out of con-
trol one settler's home burned and
entire town endangered.
Another call for help came from Kel-
sey, where it is said the fire was
threatening a school building. Wo-
men and children have been removed
from all the threatened area to places
of safety and personal belongings
were either taken out or made ready

CLASS OFFICER S
'NOMINATED FORVOETMRW

COUNCIL THROWS OUT
OF FIVE FOR POOR
TENDANCE

B1.)UO S
AT.-

TO PICK REMAINDER
AT MEETINGS TODAY
Final Elections of Classes tnaffec-
ted by Decision to be held as
' Planned
Nominations of officers for most of
tbe classes of the University were
made .yesterday at the first class.
neetings of the year, under the sup-
ervision of the Student council. 13e-
cause of the poor attendance at some
of the meetings the nominations of
five classes were determined void at
the Student coubcil tmceting last night
and the names thrown out.
The nominations from the following
classes were declared void because
of insufficient atendance: senior lits,
freshman pharmics, junior education-
al, junior laws, and freshman laws.
As a majority of the class nominations
remain good the class elections will
be held on Friday as planned. Newv
meetings for those classes whose
nominations have not been accepted
will be held in the near future but no
action will be taken until a sufficient
number of members is present.
List Given Out
The students nominated who will be
voted on Friday are as follows: jun-
ior fits, president, Hugh Duffield and
Arch CGay; vice president, Blanche
Kynast, and Helen Delbridge; treas-
urer, Robert Mitchell and Robert
Young; and secretary, Dorothy Mait-
land and Susan Fitch. Senior laws,
president, P. Norcop, and F. Wynn;
vice president, Joseph Boyle, and L.
R. ;Williams; secretary, Chalmers
McGaughay and G. W. Rouse; treasur-
er, R. L. Stuart and G. K. O'Brien.
Senior medics, president, J. W. Half-
hill and L. C. Ludlum; vice president,
Mary Saxiand Miss Li; secretary, J.
E. Croushore; and treasurer, K. P.
Jones, and Robert Heatley. Junior
architects, president, J. R. Cowin and
J. E. Dinwiddee; vice president, L. I.
Perry, and H. W. Cole; secretary, Au-
gusta Stewart and R. E. Burket; and
treasurer, F. M. Harley (competitor
ineligible.) Sophomore architects,
president, T. B. Hanna and L. E.
Kiefer; vice president, L. M. Wetzel
and K. C. Black, treasurer, D. H. Wills
and C. S. Johnson; and secretary, D.
Egert and M. M. Barnum; senior
architects, president, H. L. Farley and
D. D. Ehreshan; vice president, E. L.
Kline and Frances Sutton; treasurer,
Catherine V. Heller and E. H. Lund-
in, and secretary, Laura A. Eckert
and H. W. Wachter. Sophomore en-
gineers, president, J. Dickman, and
F. Hart; vice president, H. Scribner
and W. Webb; secretary, H. Miller
and R. Underwood; and treasurer, E.
Fox and M. Jones. Nominees of
classes not listed have been delayed
in verifying elegibifity and will be
published tomorrow.
Rest Meet Today
All classes of the University with
the exception of those who held meet-
ings yesterday for the nomination of
their officers na the freshmen fits na

Perfect Old Bow I
Unearthed Here
Stradivarius made a perfect violn,
and the products of his art have sold
for as much as $50,000. The making
of a bow for a violin is quite as im-
portant, according to authorities in
the School of Music, as the construe-
tion of the instrumentitself, and re-
cently a perfect bow was discovered
here in Ann Arbor.
It is a cello bow, the property o
a faculty member, and he recently
refused an offer of $1,200 for the sale
of it. This is the highest price evev
offered for a violin or cello bow,
according to the owner.
The how is the work of Valance, a
scion of an old French aristocracy, and
is said to be a perfect piece of handi-
craft. The owner declares it is one
of three bows, approaching perfec-
tion, whch have ever come under his
observation.
RESERVE SQUD IS
BIGGESTIN YEARS
Appal For Material by Coaches
Meets With Fine Response
From Students
SECOND TEAM CALLED BEST
SEEN IN PAST TEN YEARS
Michigan's best football reserve
squad for the past decade is driving
the Varsity into training for a suc-
cessful year, according to members
of the coaching squad. This has been
in direct result to the call to football
men made during the past week be-
cause of the initial weakness of the
squad.
"They are probably the best re-
serve squad we have had for the past
ten years, and it is the reserve squad
that makes the team," Harry Tillot-
son, assistant director of intercol-
legiate athletics said last night.
The squad at present comprises 45
men. in all and from 33 to 40 men out
for regular practice according to
Ray Fisher who is in charge of the
reserve squad. Altho the athletic as-
sociation had provided for equipment
for approximately 300 men the
amount was found inadequate to meet
the new need and over five dozen new
articles of equipment had to be or-
dered. This was due in part to the
fact that the new men are as a whole
far bigger physically than ordinar-
i ly.
Altho several have suffered slight
injuries and some others have not
previously Played football the team as
a whole furnishes stiff opponents to
the regular squad, according to Coach
Fisher.
LAST OF LINCOLN
BODY GUARD DIES
San Diego, Oct. 4.-George Terry,
said to have been the last survivor of
President Lincoln's body guard when
the president's body was taken from
Washington for burial in Illinois, died
here Tuesday at the age of 76 years.
He was born in Portsmouth, O., and
enlisted in the army at the age of 16.
He was a past chancellor of the
Knights of Pythias. Mr. Terry is sur-
vived by his widow and a brother,
Charles Terry of Portsmouth, O.
Battle For City Title

ALLIES AND TURKS
ACH AGREEMENT
CONCILIATION MARKS FIRST
MEETING OF OPPOSING
POWERS
MONTH ALLOWED FOR
EVACUATION OF THRACE
Settlement of Ismet's Neutral Zone
Suggestion is Only Question
Remaining
Constantinople, Oct. 4.-The Mu-
dania conference, it is understood this
evening, will probably reach an agree-
ment on all points of the Turkish pro-
posal under which M. Franklin Boul-
on secured Pasha's pledge to suspend
military movements during the nego-
tiation with the exception of the pro-
vision relating to the occupation of
the western line of the Marrtza river
by allied troops.
Argument on this point is still pro-
ceeding. The Allies have agreed to
turn over Thrace to the Turkish army
in. 30 days.
Parties Ready to Agree
Constantinople, Oct. 4.-Concilia-
tion thus far marked the conference
between the Allied generals and the
'Turkish representatives at Mudania
Ismet Pasha, who speaks 'for Mus-
tapha Kemal Pasha, leader of the na-
tionalists and also of the Angora gov-
ernment, has announced that the gov-
ernment has accepted the Allied pro-
proposals in principle, and he took
occasion to explain at the opening
of the session that the Turks, "had
no intention of creating incidents
with the English."
Turks Want Thrace
Ismet asked for a settlement of the
Turkish administration of Thrace and
requested that Thrace should be free
from all allied control, but he felt
that at least one month would be re-
quired to effect the transfer. He also
suggested that there should be an al-
lied covering force on the Marrtza
river, and that a neutral zone should
be created west of that river.
General Harrington's communique,
related that two or three sessions
broke up in an atmosphere which
pointed to a peaceful solution.
SIGMA DELTA CHI
ELECTS OFFICERS
Activities of Michigan News Bureau
to be Continued
Sigma Delta Chi, national profes-
sional journalistic fraternity, held its
first meeting of this school year last
night at which it elected the follow-
ing officers: E. P. Lovejoy, Jr. '23,
president; E. R. Meiss, '23, vice presi-
dent; M. A. Klaver, '23, secretary; W.
F. Elliott, '23, treasurer; and J. A.
Bacon, '24, director of the Michigan
News bureau.
Plans were also discussed concern-
ing the banquet which Sigma Delta
Chi will hold Oct. 26 during the con-
vention here of the University Press
club of Michigan convention for the
members of the convention.

HOTEL BIOS FOR LAND'
Desire For Catholic Chapel Property
On State Confirmed
Rumor that the chapel property of
the Catholic church at State and Jef-
ferson streets was to be sold to the
Post Tavern hotel management at
Battle Creek kwas confirmed last
night by Father Michael J. Bourke,
pastor of the Chapel. Everything is
in readiness for the completion of the.
deal, except that Bishop Michael J.
Gallagher has not as yet given his ap-
proval. Father Bourke said that the
price was satisfactory, but would not
tell the exact figures.
Carl F. Montgomery, manager of the
Post Tavern hotel in Battle Creek, and
M. Southern of the Laverne hotel of
the same city, representing a company
which is planning to erect a number
of hotels throughout the state, were
in Ann Arbor Tuesday making final
arrangements for the settlement.
HOPE FR CTO
ON NEW BUILDIG
Finance Committee of Administrative
Board Ready to Take Action
in Near Future
ABSENT MEMBERS HOLD UP
VOTE OF FUNDS AT MEETING
Action will be taken on the Univer-
sity's requisition for the foundation
and first structural slab of the new
Literary building at a cost of $100,-
000 "as soon as the finance commit-
tee can be brough together," accord-
ing to the last report from Lansing.
The member of the board who offer-
ed this assurance, was unwilling to
suggest a possible date for the meet..
ing, but it will undoubtedly be held
as, Poon as Mr. Fuller and Mr. D
Land, the absent members, are 'able
to return.
'The decision of Governor Groes-
beck to refer 'the requisition to the
finance committee of the adminis-
trative board, was followed'by his re-
quest to the state accounting depart-
&cnt for a report of. all state exipen-
ditures in. behalf.of .th. 'Uiversity
since 1921. This report, he said,
would be used as a guide by the fi-
nance committee In granting or refus-
ing the request of the University.-
A motion to grant funds for the
completion of the new University hos-
pital was definitely set over for the
consideration of the next Legislature.
BURTONIMPRSE
eNEW DUTY ONR2
Freshmen Told at Union Meeting of
Responsibilities to Fellows and
Universty
iNTERTAhNMENT CONCLUDES
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF YEAR
College friendship and the respon-
sibilities of the freshmen on entering
the University were the two issues
driven home by President Marion L.
Burton In his welcoming address to
the class of '26 at the Freshman Re-
ception last night at the Union.
Declaring that "There is no more
powerful thing in University life than
the friendships you have before you"
the President immediately plunged in-
to the heart of the subject, outlining
to the freshmen by concrete examples
the grasp that friendship has on all
Michigan men "through common loy-

alties, responsibilities and traditions,"
and showing them how this would be-
come even stronger and more sincere
in alumni life
In dealing with the responsiblities
that a man takes upon himself on en-
tering the University the President
said, "Remember that you are no long-
er high school boys butdcollege men.
Here we believe in student self gov-
ernment and not in violence, but be-
cause you have this new freedom do
not think that you can allow your-
self to slip up, for it all shows up in
the end.".
Thomas I. Underwood, '23L, presi-
dent of the Union, spoke to the men as
members of that'organization outlin-
ing to them its history -and signifi-
cance to every Michigan man. Fol-
lowing his talk James E. Duffy, '24,
chairman of the Upperclass Advisory
committee, addressed the freshme'n
on the organization of the advisory
body and the work it was doing
among the members of the new class
in giving them opportunities of know,.
ing each other.
Glee Club Wants Instrumentalists
Tryouts for the instrumental sec-
tion of the University Glee clubs will
he held from 2 to 5o'clnok this after-.

(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 14.-The unconquer-
able spirit to keep on trying when
success fails to come at first carried
the New York Giants to a victory this
afternoon in their first clash with the
New York Americans for the 1922 title
of world's baseball champions. The
score was three to two.
Singles Crush Hoyt
To overcome a two to nothing lead
that the Yankees had acquid, the
Giants smashed out four singles, one
right after another, in the eighth in-
ning, and then crowned the attack
with a sacrifice fly. The for hits
crushed Joe Bush, the Yankee speed
ball pitcher, and tied the score. Wade
Hoyt succeeded Bush, and'--.on his
fourth delivery yielded the sacrifice
fly which scored the deciding run of
the game.
Polo Grounds Packed
The Polo Grounds were packed. At
noon most of the reserved seats had
been filled, anathe start of the game
was two hours off. In the last half
hour came the reserved ticket hold-
ers, among them many notables'
Christy Mathewson was one whose
entrance thrilled the crowd.
Today's paid attendance, 36,514, was
greater than that of any oe of the
eightgames which the Giants and
Yanks fought out at the Polo Grounds
last year for the world's title.
First Inning
Yankees-Witt flied outt to Stengel,
Groh threw out Dugan at first. Ruth
struck out. Nehf completely fooled
him with curves. No runs; no .hits;
no errors~
giants-Ward threw out 'lanccroft
at first, taking the ball behind the
pitcher. Groh got a Texas Leaguer
into left field for the first hit of the
series. Frisch singled into left flid,
Groh going to second. .Groh went to
third and Frisch to second on a short
passed bal. Emil Meusel fouled out
to Schang. Young tried to upset the
Yank infield by bunting. Young
flied out to Pipp and the Yankees
crawled out of a hole. No runs; two
hits; no errors,
Second Inning
Yankees-Pipp went out to Kelly;,
unassisted. Meusel fanned, looking
bad against Nehf's big curves. Schang
singled to left for the first Yankee hit,
Groh threw out Ward at first. No
runs; one hit; no errors.
Giants-Kelly fanned on three
pitched balls. Ward threw out Sten-
gel at first. Dugan tookSnyder's hot
smash and got him at first. No runs;-
no hits; no errors.
Third Inning
Yankees-Scott popped, to .Gro ,
on the second ball pitched. Bush was
robbed of a hit by Bancroft, who took
the ball while running toward center.
Witt went out Frisch to Kelly. No
runs; no hits; no errors.
Giants-Pipp'took Nehf's grounder
and touched first. The crowd cheered
Bancroft. Ward scooped * up Ba-
croft's roller and threw him' out. Groh
got a long hit to left for three bases.
It was his second hit. Frisch flied out
to Ward. No runs; one hit; no er-
rors;
Fourth Inning
Yankees-Dugan singled over the
middle bag. Ruth i forced Dugan,
Frisch to Bancroft. With the count
two and three, Pipp fanned, and Ruth
was doubled trying to steal, second.
Snyder to Bancroft. No runs; one
hit; no 'errors.
Giants--Scott threw out . Meusel
on the second ball pitched to him.
Young worked the count up to two
and three, but struck out. Kelly
singled on the first ball pitched. Sten-
gel sent up a high fly to Ward. No
runs; one hit; no errors,
Fifth Inning
Yankees--Meusel sent a hot one
through Bancroft for a safe hit.
(Continued on Page Eight)

Giants

Fail In Two
Third Attempt
Successful

Attacks But
Is

SUPERIOR FIGHTING
POWER WINS FIRST
GAME 'FOR GIA9NTS
WORLD'S SERIES OPENS WITH
GREAT STRUGGLE AND
FINE PLAY
CELEBRITIES AT GAME
CHEERED BY BIG CR OWD

1

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