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October 04, 1922 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Frank Bros.

Fifth Ave. Boot Shop
New York

A

Our representative exhibits at Wild & Co.
all this week

GID SEASON OPENS IN EARNEST
ASATURDAY WHEN BIG TEAMS START1
All Conference Teams In Action Bit later against Butler college. Coachi
imns (caoi eets Geor Yost will be amnong the interested
() t MIdway -~ spectators at Columbus, SaturdayI
when Ohio, Michigan's dearest ene-
1.RtillY T(1ET K1 S:1S; hTmy, clashes with Ohio Wesleyan. The
TAC9LES 'EST ERIN RESERVE ;Methodists have no hope for victory
against the veterans of Coach Wilce,
but with a few individual stars the
Saturday next" teshrilling of - little team from Deleware may man-
ferees' whistles will call to action ige to throw a scare into the Buck-
practically every moleskin clad elev- eye camp.
en, great and small, throughout ihe Of interest to Michigan men, second
country, attracting countless thous- only, to the Ohio contest, is the first
sands to sun warmed or rain soaked intersectional game of the season at
bleacher seats, thousands whose Stagg field, Chicago, the big Maroon
prayers and cheers will be unified ini aggregation facing the University of
the hope of victory or the courage of Georgia in a game that is expected to
defeat. result in victory .for the former.
Here on Ferry field, of course, the Purple Margin Narrow
greatest local interest will center.
with Yost's charges battling the The battered Purple of Northwest-
brown clad men of Case, but: the eyes en will seek revenge against Beloit,
of all will find some interest in the (Ile little Wisconsin college that down
games from coast to coast. ed the Evanstonians in their opening
Illinois Idle game last year. Northwestern, start-
With the single exception of Illi- ing the season with bright prospects,
nois every Western Conference team has ben so crushed by injuries and
will take the field for the first time 'ineligibility that a bare ghost of the1
the Indians' debut coming a week former hope remains, and a victory

Ii i 'id

DATES OF GAMES
Best Four Out of Seven Gaines
First, Game-Wednesday, Oct. 4, Giants' home game.
Second Game-Thursday, Oct. 5, Yankees' home game., ..
Third Game-Friday, Oct. 6, Giants' home game.
Fourth Game-Saturday, Oct. 7, Yankees' home game.
Fifth Game-Sunday, Oct. 8, Giants' home game.
Sixth Game-Monday, Oct. 9, Yankees' home game.
Seventh Game-Tuesday, Oct. 10. Toss of coin will decide whether that
will be home of Giants or Yankees.
If a game is postponed on account of rain or if for some other cause a
legal game is not played, the entire remaining schedule will be advanced
one day. A tie game will be played off the following day, and the home
team of the day of the tie will remain the home team on the day of playoff.
TIME OF GAMES
Every game will start promptly at 2. p. m. Gates will open at 10 a. m.
TICI(ET PRICES
All box seats, $6.60, including tax. All lower grandstand (reserved)
seats, $5.50, including tax. Upper grandstand (unreserved) seats, $3.30, in-
cluding tax. Blacher seats, $1.
ELIGIBLE PLAYERS
Giants-Pitchers Nehf, J. Barnes, McQuillan, Scott, V. Barnes, Jon-
nard, Ryan, Hill and Blume; catchersSnyder, Earl Smith and Gaston; in-
fielders Kelly, Frisch, Bancroft, Grob, Rawlings, Maguire and MacPhee;.
outfielders .Emil Meusel, Stengel, Young, Cunningham, Robertson, King
and Shinners; manager John J. McGraw; coaches Hughey Jennings and
Cosey Dalen.
Yankees-Pitchers Bush, Mays, Hoyt, Jones Shawkey, O'Doul and Mur--
oyt, Jones, Shawkey, O'Doul and Mur- Devormer; infielders Pipp, Ward,
Scott, Dugan, Baker and MacNally;. outfielders Ruth, Bob Meusel, Witt, El-
mer Smith and Skinner; manager Miller J. Huggins; coaches Charles
O'Leary and Frank Roth.-
Umpires-For the National League, W. J. Klein and W. McCormick;
for the American League, C. B. Owens and George Hildebrand.

World's

ries I

ts

I

For dinner this evening:
Tenderloins with
French FFiedch 4O

,

Office Hours
9-12 A.M.
1- 6 P.MA

Evenings by
appointment

I11.

T ENDERLOINS of such e-
cellence that your fork
will almost sink through
them; broiled to the degree
that your own taste prefers,
savory with the juices that
are the meat's best seasoning.
And with them generous por-
tions of crisp, brown French
fried potatoes 40e.

III

IRVING WARMOLTS5 DS.
CHIROPODIST
Foot Specialist
706 First Nat. Bank Bldg.
Phone 17464
aln ism ® oiW8 aV
a3w
" 9s
® ~ CIGARS ANID
C1GAIWTTESa
Smoking is a labit, for the !
most part, pleasing and
not harmful.
All popular brands carried
at standard prices. No
long-shots. Fresh stock
and quick service. Smoke
with Iluston Bros.
BirIJARDS CIGARS CANDIES
* PIPES LUNCHES :SODAS
* t ?we try to treat you ri~ht"}
H

over Beloit by a narrow margin is all
that can be hoped for.
Jumping northward from Chicago,
Wisconsin will be found lining up
against Carleton college at about the
same time the two games at Chicago
and Evanston are starting. The Bad-
ger's powerful line and swift mov-
ing backfield should literally swamp
their opponents in a game that can
not be a severe test of the Wiscon-
sin eleven.
Still farther to the north and west

I

PATRICK PRODUCTS
are well known to you all for
their long wearing qualities
as well as the snap to their
models.

ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT HAS
MUCH LARGER ENROLLMENT
Beginning Economics has enroll-
ment of 600 students, it was announced
yesterday by Dr. C. H. May of t4e eco-
nomics department. With the 120 stu-

I

I

Michigan
Cafeteria

612 East Liberty

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dents in Economics II, a total of ,120
students is attained for what was
formerly a five-hour, one-semester
course. This is practically the same
enrollment as in October, 1921, said
Dr. May.
Fivenew instructors have been ap-
pointed to the economics staff, assist-
ing Frofessor Taylor. They are; L.
L. Watkins, formerly professor of
economics at the Universty of Texas;
J. R. Meicklejohn and N. L. Smith,
ormerly instructors at Dartmouth
niversity ,and F. W. Thrun and B.. W.
Lewis, who were advanced students in
the economics department here last
year.
Lose something? A classified in
the Daily will find it.-Adv.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.
ADRIAN - ANN ARBOR
BUS LINE
Leaving Hours From Ann Arbor
Central Standard Tine
X D
8:45 A.M.
4:4o P.M. 12:45' PA. 6:45 P.M.
X-Daily except Sunday and Holidays
D--Daily
S-Sunday and Holidays only
JAS. H. ELLITT, PROP.
ADRIAN, MICHIGAN
PHONE 926-.1
Attraction,
Etraord inary
ua CECI B.
'~ ~MIlL'S
Thomas
MVeighan,
Loio Wilsoin
Lea trice Joy
Unquestionably 'an'
achieveme nt'i na
the motion picture
industry w it h'o ut_
3qual, past or present.

RESEVES 5 TOC
Cappon and Keefer Lead Improved
First String Attack; Scrubs
Show Good Form
OPEN -S('RPVIA E ScIIEDUTLED
f0R 4:30 THIS AFTERNOON
Playing the best brand of football
they have shown thus far yesterday
afternoon on Ferry field, the Varsity
gridiron squad had little trouble in
trampling over the Reserves by a 25-0
score.
Scrimmage lasted for 45 minutes
and during that time the Varsity was
able to punch the pigskin over the
last white line of Coach Fisher's men
on four separate occasions. Three
times however the try for goal was
missed and but one lone point was
added to those made by touchdowns.
Same Lineup Used
Coach Yost used practically. the
same lineup that has been used in
most of the recent scimmiages. On
the ends were Kirk and Henderson,
with Muirhead and Vandervoort hold-
ing down the tackles. At the guards
were Rosatti and Steele wt~h Blott
stationed in the center of the line.
In the backfield Knode at quarter,
Keefer and Steger at halves and Cap-
pon at fullback completed the team.
The Varsity started out as .soon as
scrimmage opened when after carry-
ing the ball down the field in a few
tries Kirk went over for the first
score on a pass from Knode. The
next touchdownd came when Cappon
broke through on a line luilge and
went more than 25 yards to the five
yard lne where a pass from Knode
to Henderson counted 'six points.
Secod PBass Seo iies
The third tally came as a result of
a pretty forward pass followed by
broken field runing. On the 40 yard
line Keefer passed the ball to Keat-
ley, who had replaced Henderson at
end, and the new flank man went the
remainder of the distance to the goal
line through several of the Reserve
deense men.
The final score came near the end
of the scrimmage when Dunleavy, who
had replaced Cappon, went through
the center of the line for a 05 yard
run ovei' the last white marker.
Several of the men showed up much
better today than in seveira days
previous. Keefer and Cappon were
the outstanding players for Coach
Yost. Time after time Cappon broke
through the line for nice gains and
Keefer could always be counted upon
for what was needed by ian off-tackle
or end run. Dunleavy elso showed up
well while he was in the game, his
65 yard run being one of the features.
On the line, Vandervoort and Blott
both held down their positions unus-
ually well for new men. The former
vwas especially good at opening holes
on offences, while Blott's passing was
good and his work on defence show-
ed improvement. There was no
'umbling to speak of by the Var-
i-m.
sity.;
Rueserves OpenUp
During the latter art of the. ~tame
the Reserves handed the first team
a surprise by completing three for-
ward passes. The first from Da to
Bloomer was good for 10 yards and the
second from Day to Tracy nettea an-
other 10, while the third, the pret-
tiest of them all with Tracy and Ruel
as the combination, went for more
than 20 yards.
Open scrimmage will be held at
4:30 this afternoon When th Varsity
will take on both the Reserve and
the freshman squads. The yeaing
team will furnish the opposition for
the first quarter and will give way
to the Reserves until theseondhalf
when both teams will again oppose
the Varsity, the freshmen in the third
and the Reserves in the lst quarter.
Got a room to rent? A Daily cassi-
fled ad will find a roomer.-Adv.1
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

Extra Concert Series

In Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor

,

Oct. 3o=-Ina Bourskaya,

Russian
Soprano

Prima donna with the Metropolitan and Chicago. Opera Companies.
with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor.

Soloist

WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
THE ARRIVAL OF THE 1922 MODELS
-- --- FOR YOUR APPROVAL --
TINKER AND COMPANY
SO. STATE AT WLLIAM ST.
THE HOME OF
BETTER CLOTHES AND FURNISHINGS
AT FAIR PRICES

Nov. 2-Raoul Vidas,

French
Violinist

I

"

A brilliant and fiery virtuoso who has won great admiration. Soloist with the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra in a strictly popular program, Victor Kolar, Conducting.

MMORM

OWN

Dec. 4-=Alfred Cor-tot,

French
Pian ist

,.
... ... n:-, x 1

This artist has made a profounYd impression and is called "A Second Pader-
wski." Ills reetals are master-pieces of pianistic art.

Jan. 15==Kathryn Meisle,

American
Contralto

The great success of this fine artist at the last May Festival Is responsible
for her second Ann Arbor engagement. She is a magificent singer and possesses
unusual talent. Soloist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in a strictly popular
program, Victor Kolar, Conducting.

This Is the High Point
In our stocks of Suits and Overcoats. More
styles, fabrics and colors now than any other
time in the season.
It's a good time to look for yours. You're sure
to like the Par-Kerry ideas from Fashion Park.

Feb. 19=-Maurice Dumesnil,

French
Pianist

This brilliant artist has made a most enviable record throughout Europe and
in South America where he gave 158 concerts last season. Soloist with the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor.
COURSE TICKETS may be ordered by mail (selected in order of receipt) at
$2.00, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00.
Concerts begin at 8 o'clock sharp Eastern Standard Time. Special interurban cars leave
hall after all concerts.

Fresh Toques,

More and Less
Pots, Lab. Aprons, Waiters' Coats, -etc.. etc., at
most reasonable prices. See us.

I

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