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February 28, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-02-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPEB OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday'
ing tke University year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications.
Uember of Western Conference Editorial
sociation.,
the Associated Press is exclusively en-
ed to the use for republication of all1
ws dispatches credited to it or not other-
Be credited in this paper and the local
vs published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
chigan, as second class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
)filces: Ann Arbor Pi ss Building, May-
A Street.
Phones : ditorial, 2414 and 176-M; Busi-
s. oho.4

national stage be if only those offer-
ings attracting the greatest lumber
were put forth? A conglomeration of
cheap .burlesque, risque musical
shows, inartistic melodramas, and!
nonsensical comedies; a disgrace to
the mentality of a civilized nationl

I
,
i.
i
l
,
t

DASTED.LL
TO HER
All alone I washed the dishes
Leaning Pisas stacked around me-
Scrubbing, rubbing, making wishes
They would fall and cease to hound

I

would result.
OOur movies are largely a disgrace
to national intelligence.. Fine novels;
have been stripped of all their good
qualities in the hands of the motion
picture director. Others have had so
much overemphasis put upon scenic
effect that the stories themselves fadej
into insignificance. The true art of
the balanced drama has been lost
amidst the desires to please the whole'
and receive the greatest profit.

CAMPUS OPINION I
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
After many winter months during
which one needed to either splash as
through a morass or slip as though
on a mer-de-glace in order to navi-
gate the fair thoroughfares of this
good community of lazy citizens, blind-
ly rushing students, and lawless Ford
drivers-which we know as Ann Ar-
bor, I have finally had the ill-fortune

ICICG AN

SONG

BOOK

LAST EDITION OF

0 :AT

THEAMS
BOTH STORES

met

't

While I labored, growing angry,
Came a fairy princess smiling-
Smiling with her eyes upon me,
Eyes that shone with light beguil-
ing.

Communications net to exceed soo words
signed, the signature not necessarily to
>pear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
nd notices of events will be published in
he Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if
ft at or mailed to The Daily oflice. Un-
gned communications will receive no con-
ideratian. No manuscript will be returned
tless the writer encloses postage. The Daily
oes nothnecessarily endorse the sentiments
xpressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL1 STAFF
Telephones 2414 And 176-M
RANAGING EDITOR
MARION B. STAHL
ews E ditor...................Paul Watzel
ity 1dittr. ......James B. Young
ssistatr C(ity l;ditor----------J, A. Bacon
cIrtoialI Board Chairman.....E. R. Meiss
ight 1,ditors-
Ralph Byers Harry 1e1
1. . 1ershdorfer R. C Moriarty
1. A. Donahue J. E. Mack
oris PWditor............Vallace F. F'liott
'omen's 1?ditor..............Marion Koch
mday lagazine Iditor......H. A. Douaiiue
ictorial Editor................Robert Tarr
usic Editor.....................E. H. Ailes,
Editorial Board
. well Kerr Maurice Berman
Eugene Carmichael
Assistants

ABSTRACTS
"Love, religion, politics-these are
the important things of life, and they
are all abstract ideas; things that you
can't put your hand upon, that you
cannot measure," averred ProfessorI
Robert M. Wenley in a recent'lecture
to a class in philosophy.
This thought so violently clashe

Bobbed hair gave nodded greeting,
Asked to share my task unvaunted;
Straightway anger left me fleeting-
Dishes then I longed for, wanted.
ZEKE.
* * *
Watch the frosh
As he slips and sloshes

'to fall twice within the shadow of
the Engineering Arch-once upon oneI
end of my vertebral column and the;
other time-for variety's sake, upon
the other end. I should have used
my alpenstock, I imagine.
Many modern villages have ordi-
nances which are enforced, providing
for the cleaning of walks, draining
off of water and roughening icy sur-
faces and the like. Would that it.
were so here. The building and
grounds department should at least
employ some shovelographers tot
r. ake the campus walks safe for civ-
ilization,-thus setting an example for
the lazy Ann Arborites who neverthe-
less would probably continue as they
have done all winter-to wait, wait'
and wait for nature to do the work.
Nothing could perhaps arouse in them
a sense of civic pride.
i RP L. R., '24M.j

DETROIT UNITED LINE$
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--
6:zoo am., 7:00 a.mi., 8:zoo a.mn., 9 :o5
a.ni. and hourly to 9 :o5 p.m.
Jackson Express Cars (lo(al stops
west of Ann Arbor)-9:47 a.m.,and
every two hours to 9 :47 p.m.
Local Cars East Bounnd-7:oo a.n.
and every two hours to 9:oo p.. m.,
ii :oo p.m. To Ypsilanti only--t1:40
p.m., i1:15 .a.m.
To Saline-Change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a.m.,
12:10 p.m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Lim-
ited cars 8:47, 10:47 a.m., 12:47, 2:47,
4:47 p.m.
To Jackson and Lansing--Limited at
8:47' p.m.

,

elma Andrews
a:ilcy i1. Armstrong
anley M. Baxter
arothy Bennett*
dney fielfield
A. Billington
clew Brown
C. Clark
B. Connable

Ronald Halgrisr
Fanklin D .Hepburn
Winona A. libgard
Edward J. Higgms
1enrnth C. Keliar
Elizabeth Liebermann
j ohn McGinnis
ainuel Moore
M. H. Pryor
WI3_ Raffert

r

i

a

with the generally accepted valuation Aross the campus
of the things of the universe that it * *
merits a more than casual considera- In his goolashes.
tion. * *
The average citizen believes that he One thing ,ice about this town is
thinks in concrete terms. Such ex- that the streets here are the same a
- pressions as, "Put it in black and the ones in Venice. .
white", "Get down to brass taclrs", * *
and, "Be definite", are continually re- 5pRI7 IS hERE
curring fragments of, modern day
E Not only does the spring thaw show
conversation. And in actuality, the
average citizen follows the concrete that the season of spring has arrived,
closely in his train of thought. but Jimmie the ad taker has placed
Love! To the average citizen this his bit of evidence before the public.
LThe ad in T. D.
thought links itself with a black-orb- LOST-N .Fireplace on Toule-
ed demoiselle or a gray-haired matron, L
varying accordin* to the citizen-hut vard, gold, octagonal, Bristol-make
a very specific item, amenable to;wist watch, initials M. F. on hack.
measurement and, on occasion, to Please call M. K. F. 2676. Reward.
squeezing.EE
Religion! Does this not mean vest- OWED TO TElE WAr1IFOV
menus, ceremony, and a whole set of Heaven above you
outward manifestations? One faith. Clear and blue;
Christian Science-and this said with Co-ed a-coming
all due respect-devotes itself whol- Your heart a-strumming
ly to the spirituutl realm, yet its serv, Somehow you know
ices are held in solid, brick-and-mor- You'll be her beau
tar churches, attended by people who BUT-
come in very substantial looking mo- You stub your toe
tor cars. Seek an ice floe
Politics! Does this not suggest Miss the gang plank
LaFollette, the Ship Subsidy Bill, the Park your left flank
G. O. P. elephant, or the Demoeratic Across the bay;
donkey? Quietly pray
It may be true that abstract ideas God'll skip a day
are most, important1 but Man thus far Till your poor clay
has not yet learned to do without the Can sprout green grass
concrete symbols. So she can pass.
POP.

-1

._...

1923
4
:f
1s3

:
12
1.)
2)) 7

FEBRUARY
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
21) 21 22
27 28

2
9
16
23

1923
3
10
17
24

. {
t i
!" t
k
_I
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EDITORIAL COMMENT
("()LLE~x'FE'EITORS AND) CO-EDbS
(Univ. of Washington Daily)
Throughout t h e intercollegiate
world the tendency upon the part of

Evelyn I. Coughlin- Robert G. Ramsay
Josep h Epstein Campbell Robertson
T. .F'iske . J. ,W. Ruwitch
John Garlinghouse Soli J. Schnitz
Walter S. Gopdspeed Frederic G. Telmos
Portia ( niiddr 1hili MC Wavnrn'.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER
ALBERT J. PARKER
Advertising............ohn J. Hamel, Jr.
Advertising..............alter K. Scherer
Advertising...........,awrence i.1. Favrot
'ucation...............Edward 1. Conlie:
(7onywriting............David . M. Park
Circuation..............Tow send 'll. Wolfe
Accounts............... L. eaumont arks
Kenneth Seick s Aan S. Morton
George Rockwood James A. Dryer

embryonic editors has been to treat
education as a peculiar situation in
society to be dealt with analytically
and precisely as one would diosect a
grapefruit. The resulting editorials
have been startling. and their, prolix-
ity has worked alike to the embarrass-
ment of their readers and the pulp
manufacturers.
The latest subject of ejitorial corki-
ment which has been handed about
from college to college is the matter
of coeducation. Bearded youths have
plied frantic pens from Maine to Cal-
ifornia denouncing and upbraiding the
more deadly partner in this fearsome,
world. Coeducation is ruining the
young manhood of the country. No
more Daniel Websters now. Who
shall man the helm of the ship of
state?
It is our opinion that education is
life itself and whoever would rule out
the co-ed might with fqual idiocy rule
the fair sex off the planet. If the
l women are capable, let them run the
ship of state and leave us to our golf

-SPRING
OIrc I HATS
K~~ ~ E ADY
Our $3.00 and $3.50 Hats
GUARANTEED
We Save You a Dollar or
More on a Hat
We do all kinds of Meaning
I and Reblocking of hats at
low prices for HIGH CLASS
WORK.
FACTORY HAT. STORE
617 Packard Street Phone 1792
Where D ' R Stops at State

~t11Ellililil1 l111111 fti11111 111 lilfill !lltli11111 1 #!i illll 1 tlitlialilt i'
"An ounce of prebention
is i&ortl a pound of curk"
TAKE THIS TO HEART AND
Phone 525
FOR
Expert Plumbers
W M. HoCHR EIN
211 South Fourth
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C
J

11

BY YOUR PENS OF
DE R.'S EN' SH P
Pen Specialists
OUx SKILLED SERVICE
COES WITH EVERY PEN
WE CARRY PARTS FOR AND REPAIR
AND MAAKES OF PENS
24 HOUR SKVICE
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RIDER'S PEN SHOP
The fountain of pen satis-
faction.

I

iI

r

ow

Perry M. Hayden Wn. G. Good
Eugene L. Dunne Clyde L. Hagerman LITERATURE OF DESPAIR
Win. Graulich, Jr. Henry Freud
John C. laskin Herbert P. Bostick When Mr. Glenn Frank, editor of,
E. D. Arntrout Clayt Prcdy the Century Magazine, recently stated
Herbert W. Cooper ,T. B. Sanzenbacher . that the world could not combat social
Wallace Flower Clifford Mitts a .
William I r: Reid. Jr. Ralph Lewright and industrial disitegration by
flarold L. Ihale Philip Newall blindly chanting, "Day by day, in
Win.1D. Roesser
every way, the world is growing bet-
ter and better," he most assuredly
told the truth.
WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 28, 1923 It is extremely doubtful, lowever,
if Dr. Cone ever . intended that his
fight r- LH .YER little "day iby day" formula should be
considered a cure-all for worldly po-;
wlUNS INE IN THE OVIES !litical and social evils. lie wouldj
Of the hundreds of motion picture probably claim no more for it, even 1
productions presented before the j today, than that it is helpful for a'
American public every .year, just how certain class of individuals whose
ills are largely mental.
many ha'e had the sem~blance ofa Mr. Frank says that the evils of the
tragedy 'until the last few moments world are pointed out in the "litera-
and then unexpectedly concluded with ture, of despair", in which five fears
an absurd "happy ending" which ruin- are to be found, and he adds that this
ed the effect of the entire film? It "literature of despair" should not be
tdisregarded.
i impossible to answer this question
Here again, is good advice. This;
i numlbcrs, but safe to say that pr^ac- so-called "literature of despair" cer-j
tically every film which had the pos- tainly serves a purpose, for to a cer4
sibilities of tragic development was tain number of readers it is produc-
closed with the standard perfect end- tive of deep and stimulating thought.
ing which has dominated American This type of literature is of its na,
filmmdom since its origin. The tragic ture pessimistic. To the young, un-

* * *
I went to a party with a Jane,
And met with an awful mishap
For I awkwardly emptied a cupful
Qf tea right into her lap.

y
___.. I

,

But Jane was cool, tho' "it" wasn't
For none as tactful as she
And smiling with sweet composure
She said, "the drinks are on me."'
POISON IVY.

in peace. No man ever guided the
ship of state while ranting at our fair
sisters. Anyway its a matter of self
protection. Maybe they'll rule us off
if we don'tlook out.

* * *
CONF'I)ENTIALLY SPEAKING
Those at the formals with

COTP)REINSIVE EXAMiNATIONS
(The Princetonian)

whoop skirts certainly
ought to wheel about
easily.'
* * *

Harvard some years ago inaugurated
a system of comprehensive examina-
tions ii certain of its departments

I

JoKr.. with excellent results and we see no

IL

inovie is something unknown to;
American audiepices.
The precise reason for this state
of affairs in the realm of filmdom isE
quite evident. It is altogether rea-
sonable to suppose that no producing
company is willing to sacrifice mate-
rial profits for the attailtment of a
higher goal in artistic development,
for up to the present time no picture
has been made without the predom-
inant idea of an appeal to the massI
es, On the basis of this assumption
we can trace the existence of the
present conditionrdirectly to the pro-
ducers whlo so readily sacrifice dra-
mnatic effect for the ready approval
of the greatest number--those only!
satisfied with the proverbial "happy
ending".
No one will deny the right of each
producer to develop his pictures as
he personally 'chooses, but for the;
benefit of these who would see the
silent drrna grow along the same
lines as the older form of ;spoken
drama some effort should be made to
produce a finer motion picture, one;
which will make as great an appeal
to the cultural individual as a stagef
play. Certainly it would entail a de-
crease in profits, but the millionairef
movie magnates must stop. occasion-
ally to offer the more intelligent!
classes of the populace something in
which they are interested if they de-

seasoned reader, it may do more
harm than good, for this type of read-
er may leave the "despairing" litera-
ture feeling that the world is all{
wrong, and that fate has been par-
ticularly unkind to him. But to the
thinker, the man accustomed toI
weighing both sides of a question be-
fore making any conclusions, "liter-
ature of despair" is valuable. It will
stimulate the thinking man to
thoughts which a blindly optimistic
book might never inspire. The result
of such thinking may be constructive
advice which society can adopt to ad-
vantage. The "literature of despair"
must not be rejected as entirely de-
structive merely because of its pessi-
n'iistic tone.
Spring and summer are approach-
ing. Soon there will be little need of
coat-hooks in class rooms. And next
year there may be only six months
of winter in which to neglect to pro-
vide for the hanging up of garments..
Football games are to start ear-
lier this fall, so as to preclude all!
possibility of playing a game in
darkness, or having some player hide
the #ball in the "blackness of the eve-
ning"
Althoug i the unfinished Union,
swimming pool has been found to bej

[OVIE OF A FROSH MAKING HIS
FIRST DATE
Show comes to town,
Decides to take girl.
Decides not to.
Changes mind.
Changes mind again.
Looks up girl's phone number.
Decides not to.
Calls girl.
Grows nervous waiting. '
Decides not to.
Doesnt.
Still waits.
Girl answers.
Frosh feels funny.
Frosh feels funnier.
Cannot speak.
Girl answers again.
Frosh finally speaks.
Stutters.
Feels hot.
Feels cold.
Doesn't feel.
Comments on weather.
Finally decides to ask her.
Decides not to.
Does.
Giil thinks it over.
Frosh grows hot again.
Frosh grows cold again.
Afraid she'll refuse.
Certain she'll accept.
She accepts.
OH! BOY, "AI N'T LOVE GRAND."
TEARABLE.

reason why such a plat should not be
adopted in Princeton. One of the
greatest draw-backs of modern curri-
cula is that the student is graduated
with a great number of courses to
his credit abut little real knowledge.
Too much stress is laid on electives
and the like and not enough on fun-
damental education. The comprehen-
sive examination equalizes the stress
for many fields of study.
In the department of history at
Harvard an examination is given to
all students in that department which
must be passed successfully befoie
graduation. The advantage of this
one examination, given in addition to
the regular term tests, is that it re-
quires of a student a thorough knowl-
edge, not only of the several courses,
which he has taken, but also of the
whole field of hi;story, with the re-
sult that he appreciates his subject
and understands the relation of the
different histories to one another.
The History Department would
probably be the easiest in which to
try out the scheme of comprehensive
examinations in Princeton, but the
plan would be beneficial in other de-
partments. Princeton, standing for a
cultural education, should also advo-
cate by its example a well-rounded
knowledge by the student of the
study of his choice. The graduate
would then have a true understand-
ing of his particular field, embellished
by an appreciation of. other subjects,I
instead of a topsy-turvey mass of dis-
connected facts and isolated opinions.
Prize Offered for Best Poem
Southern Methodist university at
Dallas, Texas, has offered a prize of
$100 for the best poem submitted by
any undergraduate college student in
American colleges and universities.
The last date upon which entries for
the prize will be accepted is March 15.

, I
a _''
- ~ ".~ g~f~",r
Ii Cr
\ _ .X. 1 , _ .A . .. ... -o

0

New suits for spring are
here Norfolks, 3 and 4
button sacks. Fabrics are
finer, more colorful than

eVer;

values

are greater

$39

$45

Extra trousers,$6 to $8.50

The

Reule Conlin

Contributions contributions.
"A new shipment of Scotch receiv-
ed". Don't get thirsty -- they are

i

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