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October 03, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I "

ICHIGAN UAILY'

Ill ikAi &3AIN i)AIL Y

DEEF

f'

'I
AP

ON
1 orgy

Giants In Action AndName"Speech
[Tark s first Of New York 's Story
(By Associated Press) A. Stoneham. Francis McQuade and
New York, Oct. 2.-"Giants in ac- McGraw purchased the club from the
B I

Inju ria°4 to Veterans Wreck
i:vey ortwv te

By NormaIn E. Brown who can stand punishment. But Car-
The recent sensational victory of pentier's condition that night is a mat-
- . x te___ .. -- - 3 7' o ri ie c n "P , s - -1r -

I I

IETG'ilLITY, TOO, PLAYS.
TRIVKS ON EVANST4NIANS
(loom of the deepest kind spread
over the Northwestern university
campus following the announcement
from the faculty that Morris Blumen-
thal, Purple backfield ace and only
veteran quarter back, had been hope-'
lessly ineligible and forbidden to en-
ter classes. Blumenthal who last
year attracted much attention, had
been counted upon as one of the main
stays of the Purple back field.
Lame Out
Injuries have also added much to
the uncertain outlook of the. team.
John Lane, heaviest of the guards
and rpromising varsity candidate, re-
ceived an injury to his back which,
according to king Brady, trainer, will
heep him off the squad for two weeks.j
W illiam, varsity half will be out of
pj'actice for a week due to injuries.
Ole Dahl has a broken nose that King
Brady says is the worst he has ever
seen. Ralph Countryman's injury to
his right elbow will probably keep
him out for the remainder of the sea-
son. The other casualities are as fol-
lows: Wright Erwine, injury to shoul-
der, Reading Putman, injured foot,'
and Mills, minor injuries.
Men Shifte'd
Coach This.ewaite is having a hard
time in finding a permanent combina-
tion. He has constantly shifted his
men from position to position in or-
der to obtain the best lpossible ar-
rangement. No man on .the squad
knows where he may be shifted from
day to day, and it is a certainty that
no man knows whether he has a
berth on the team yet.
New Rule Hurts'
Thistlewaite is having a hard time
in bringing his men .to conform with
the. new ruling that all mdtion on the
offensive team must have stopped be-
fore the ball is snapped. This new
ruling will be especially hard on the
Purple's team, because of the exten-
sive use they made, of the motion play
in the past years.
The following men are likely to,
make the team; Mikkelson and C.
Johnson as ends, Penfield, Davis, and
Hastings as tackles, Horton or Hallo-
well at center, the quarter either
Weinecke or Rembe, Palmer, McEl-
wain, and Lauter at halves, and Capt.
Paterson and Wolfe as full backs.
A free trip will be given to the Mich-
igan-Minnesota game by the Arcade
Barber Shop.-Adv. .
Martha-Ann Fruit Cakes of Cincin-
nati. Tice's Dr.ug Store. 117 S. Main,
St.-Adv..
Ask a user; he will tell yob Rider's
"Masterpen" is the best.-Adv.t

'Battling Siki, the ebony hued warrior
from the equatorlal- regions of Af-
rica, lover Georges Carpentier, idol'
of France, is having its aftermath.
The usual conjectures are being rais-
Jed..
Will he fight Dempsey next?
t Whatnchancerwill he have, against
C the Giant Killer?
Will America see him soon?
What manner of man is he to take
that terrible right of the jiumping
Frenchman-the right which rocked
Dempsey and fogged his brain mom-
entarily at least?
Answer tothe first quest oi:' Mr.
Siki probably will fight Dempsey some
day, but not in the near future.
Carp Made Preliminary Trip
Recall the "battle of a century"
between Carpentier and "Jacques the
Demps"? Carpentier made one trip
to America a year before the match,
jjust to help boost interest in the bat-
tle. He met a setup-Battin kcevin-
sky-and then went home to let the
plans take.form. This procedure prob-
ably would be followed again with
Siki.
Second: His chances again Demp-
sey are mostly a matter of .opinion.
There is this point which can be
considered, however: Dempsey is
more of Siki's type. Carpentier was
the fast, clever, cunning fighter with
one deadly punch. Siki is first of all
a case-hardened statue of steel, built
to take anything the ordiitarY -ight-
er can hand him and then by brute
strength fell his opponent.
Dempsey has the speed and the
cunning Carpentier has. But in ad-
dition Dempsey apparently has the
iron physique that Siki has. Demp-
sey has a knockout walop in 'either
hand which he can deliver from any
angle. He has, also, a physique more
like that of Siki's. He could fight Siki
in his own style and carry him with
him the advantage of' experience,
greater speed, no doubt, and more
nearly the same amount of endurance.
To Show London
IDate reports indicate that (Siki's
next bout will be with Joe Beckett or
some other English heavy in London.
His status hasnt been determined,,
definitely by his victory over Car-
basks in tlje limelight over tfhere.
months in the making while Siki
mean immediate departure for Amer-
ica to collect the waiting coin, here.
Again, Siki might find more ready
matches abroad which, would assure
him a fair return and easy victories.
So the time of his arrival can't even
be guessed at.
As to Siki himself.
His status hasn't been determned
pentier. The fact that he took Carp's
definitely by his voctory over Car-
man-killing right and lagubted in the
Frenchman's face stamps him as a
tough warrior-a rugged creature

ter oa discussion. T'here are those
'who think the Frenchman, busy with
his movie contracts .and taking Siki
as a joke, failed to train as religiously.
as he dirt for, Dempsey and other
worthy foes. There are others who:
have insisted right along that Demp-;
[T'LL 3BE A LONG
TIME I3EF9RE SIKI
ATrifhES DEMPSEY

tion as well as in stature," mused old
Jim Mutrie, one 'day more than a
quarter of a century ago as he sat
observing the New York team, then
an aggregation of six-footers, stride
to victory as easily as a fairy-book
man wearing seven-league boots
would win a . Marathon race.. Ever
since they have been the "Giants"-
professionally, competitively and fi-i
nancially.
The Giants are now 40 years old.
"Mutrie brought the club into exist-
once in 1883 by inducing John B..
Day, a rabbid fan of the sideburns
(lays, to finance his idea. Jim tookthe
management and played the first sea-
sons on the old Polo Grounds, then'
on Fifth avenue, gaining admittance
to the National League in its initial
year by replacIng the Troy team..
On that "nine," figuratively and ac-
tually a "nine" with no substitute
pitchers nor catchers, were "Buck
Ewing," Mickey ,Welch, Roger Con-
nor, Pat Gillespie and Ed Haskins, all
big muscular men. Mutrie remained
as manager until Day sold his inter-
ests to Cornelius Van Cott in 1893.
Van Cott didn't stick along, disposing I
of the franchise in 1895 after the
club had finished- fifth in 1894.
Andrew Preedmian was the next
owner, retaining control. for eight'
years, but the club was unsuccessful,
finishing in the second division in
every year except 1897. ' In his eight-
year span Freedman had 11 man-
agers, including ,George Davis, Jack
Doyee, Harvey Watkins, Arthur Ir-
win, Bill Joyce, Captain A. C. Anson,
John B. Day, Fred Hoey, Buck
Ewing, George Smith and Horace
Fogel.
John Joseph McGraw, "Napoleon of
Baseball," came to the helm, in 1903
after he had lost both his heart ,and
head in the old Baltimore Orioles, and
finished second his first year. John T.
Brifih, builder of the pres~nt im-
posing edifice, sometimes called the
Brush Stadium, was the owner then.,,
The following year McGraw's team
won the pennant but refused to play
,he Boston Americans for the World's
Championship. The refusal led to the
formation of the former National
Commission in the, following year and
it at once made mandatory a series of
contests for the supremacy of the'
world. 'The Giants won the pennant
again the next year and defeated the
Philadelphia Athletics, four games to
one, for the title.
Harry Hempstead, in 1911, succeed-
ed his father-in-law, John T. Brush,
as head of the club, and six years
later gave McGrew a new contract
which included stock in the operating
company. Two years later Charles
-I
Lose., something? A classified in
the Daily will find it.-Adv.

rus - estate and Stoneham became
the president.
Go oIf -Prospects
SeemBr lljant
Michigan's golf prospects this
year are very bright in spite of the
fact that only two of last year's team
will be able to compete, Winters and
Smith being the only old men on
h " , T+ x:;1 1. ,,.,.,,,_ e - t

COUPON FIVE FOR
OHI-MCHNUAM
The Athletic Association desires to
call to the attention of the students
anct faculty the necessity of including
Athletic Coupon No. 5 in their orders
for tickets for the Ohio State-Michi-
gan football game, October 21, 1922.
Each student and each member of
the faculty is entitled to buy four
tickets in a special section of seats
reserved for Michigan students and
faculty. In order to identify the per-
son 'for. persons as students or faculty
members, the Athletic Association re-
q"ires that Coupon No. o theAh

nad. It will be necessary for tne order, If this coupon is not enclised
committee'which is composed of Carl- the application will be treated as a
ton F. Wells, Prof. T. C. Trueblood, mail order.
Assistant Professor H. P. Scott and ._
John Winters, to pick the remaining See, the Minnesota game at the Ar-
two needed to make the team com- cade Barber Shop's expense. Ask the
plete, fron the twenty-five students barber.-Adv.
who turned in the best scores last
week for eighteen consecutive holes. Open Sundays rrom 9:30 to 4:30
Slaughter, who was on last year's p. m. Lyndon Shop.-Adv.
team, will be unable to compete be-
cause of ineligibility, due to studies. Rider, the pen specialist.-Adv.
However, Prof. T. C. Trueblood says
that there will be pleity of gocd mate-
rial this year and a very strong team
will no doubt be developed.
Last year's team won eight meets 'A
and lost only to the unusual teamG
that Chicago turned out. This year's
team at Chicago will also be very
strong and no doubt it will be here
that the Varsity team will find the

Specially prepared Tooa aerved at
the Chinese Gardens, 106 S. Main st.
.-Adv.
- -
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.
COMING
Attraction
. xtraordinary
Thomas
th( m~oti(n 1011 1t
industry i t h o u t .
7 il um or.res(ent.
HI I H

greatest amount of competion.
Michigan Daily and Chimes for $4.50.

CEO
'F1Y Furi

35
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USSUUUSSUUISm~atuuu

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a

MADI -ON-AnNUE CW?. FORIY-FOU RTH STRUX m
NlEW YORK

Telephic Murray 11ill 88

CANDY

Largest and freshest as-
sortment of popular sell-
ing bar and package can-
dy. Quick service. Every.
body likes good candy and
few like to wait.

Our Representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER, DETROIT
on the following .days
during the coming season
with Samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats & Shoes

sey took the fight out of Carpentier-
killed his confidence and thereby his
main asset.
Sili, all observers agree, fights
more with the primitive instinct of his
tribe than with a knowledge of box-
ing.
Experience May Spoil him
If he can retain his jungle style he
may continue to knock 'em stiff. But
it is the history of boxing that many
natural fighters have hurt their own
careers by unconsciously absorbing'
the finer points of the game.. It is
doubtful if Jack Dempsey hits with
the terrific power and man-killing
manner he did when he was slugging
his way to the championship. He
has learned to handle himself differ-
ently. He uses more footwork. He
has learned to hit and draw away.
Siki, therefore, cannot be consider-
ed in the light of a possible contend-
er for Dempsey's crown. He stands
now as a freak of the ring-the latest
sensation. The next few months willj
give us a better rating for him.

October 23, 24
December 4, 5

L____I

BOSTON
TREMONT-~OR. BOYLSTON

N EW P ORT
220 SELLEVUE AVENUE

:2

.1

WI

Ir MIJINUDS -cleA~tRS CJLN;,ES
PIPES LUNCHES SODAS
trig,. triy to treat you. uihel

km

m

:1'U

53,3 pl UItt.i 353 S o R4 a

,.

'TOMS THIS
CLOSES Sl ES
AT S P.M. ADVERTISING AT 3 PM.
MICHIGAN DAILY
Classified Rates. Two Cents per word a day, paid in advance. 'Min-
imum charge for first day, 25c. Minimum thereafter, 20c. Thlgree
cents per word per day if charged. White space charged for at rate
of 5e per agate line. Classified, charged only to those having .hones.
Liner Rates: Twelve cents per line, without contract, paid in advance.
PHONE 960

FORR ENT
FOR RENT-Large, clean, well-venti-
lated rooms, newly decorated. New
furniture throughout. Brick house
with steam heat. Centrally lq-
cated at 333 E. Huron. Married
douples preferred. 7-2
FOR RENT-One excellent, extra
large, well-furnished double room
for two men. It will pay you to in-
vestigate. Everything brand new.
301 E. Liberty. 7-3.
FOR RENT-Sleeping porch and study
room, ideal location, no other room-
ers. Single beds. Rent 'reasonable.
Suitable for two -girls or boys. Phone
383-W. 8-21
FOR RENT-One suite and one double
or single roomn for students. All
ihodern. Godd heat. Phone 2420-J
or 337 E. Williani St. 7-2
FOR RENT-A fine well heated, front
room down stairs. No other room-
ers. Suitable for an instructor or
student. 401 S. Division.. 8-2
FOR RENT-Rooms; two front single
rooms or ,one suite; newly decor-
ated. 445 S. Fourth Ave. Phone 1772-J.
6-3
FOR RENT-Two suites for boys; one
suite for light housekeeping on first
floor. 914 S. State. Phone 2801-M.
7-3
FO RENT-Front suite for two boys.
Half block from campus. $8.50. Call
2758-J. ' 8-21
FOR RENT-Single or double room,
steam heated, southwest exposure.
Block from campus. Call 1889-W.8
FOR RENT-Exceptionally well furn-

WANTED
WANTED- Roommate - wonderful
suite, fine location across from Eng-
ineering Arch. 1103 S .University.
{ 82
WANTED- Roommate by Freshme M
Engineer. 604 Mary Court. Phone
936-R. $2.50. 8-2
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-New Ford Coupe. 'Has
been run 300 miles. Complete with
spare tire and license. Cannot be
told from new. A bargain for some-
one. Shown by appointment.
Phone 2951-W. 8-2
FOR SALE-Hammond typewriter in
good condition. $25.00 1037 ald-
win Ave. 8-3
RADIO SET-Single circuit regenera-
tive, neatly encased. $20.00. Plone
1937-M. 8-2
FOR SALE-Typewriter, good as new,
for $25.00. 1219 Geddes. S42-J. S
FOR SALE LRudd Automati leater.
$50.00. Phone Booth 2666.,, 6-21
LOST
LOST-Between Natural Selefice anA
Union Saturday, Grui wrist
watch with silver strap. Call Hart-
well at 909. 8
LO T-Brown latlher billfold con-
taining check and 24 dollars cash.
Leave at Daily office. 8
LOST-Silver Fountain Pen.. TIitials
°.F. L. A. Return to 1145 Washtenaw.
Reward. , 6-3f
fT-mThm4n~i. r n ftn1i1a

FACULTY MEN WILL
ATTEND MEETING
Several local faculty members will
take part in the annual convention
of The American Society for Steel
treating in the General Motors build-
ing, Detroit, this week.
Tomorrow :Prof. A. E. White, of the
chemical engineering department, will
deliver a written discussion on "Pa-
per" at the morning session of the
convention. ThQ following afternoon
he will att as chairman o'f the Re-
search session. Other members of
the chemical engineering faculty who
will take part in the discussions are
'Prof. William P. Wood, Prof. Clair
Upthegrove, Prof. Harry L. Campbell,
and Prof. hdlward Lm. Campbell, direct-
or of the chemical laboratory.
Along -with the convention there
will be the International Steel expo-
sition, covering over 60,00'0 feet ;f
space in the General Motors build-
ing. He4e there wil be some excel-
lent exhibits on the fabrication of
steel.
The entire public, especially stud
-enti is invited to attend this, whihh
will last until FI O'ay afternoon. A
nominal fee will 1o carged.
Attraction
Extraordinary
C1
Thomas
Ms rrn '

wip
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CBarlf J " , f
parr' -'_ .. 'L
Pr r
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lid

NThe cG
Ilk DLLAR
Lcntl io
\oldSle

RSa
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oo:
erw
-lain
le J1
$2:
aetit
linty
Go]
)r ,
)bon

wih
i or
IUNIOR Soc
ivlittle pen-
n.

{-
or without eraser.
The INGERso
WEIGHnThSc.
0'laned or tedh
not merly,$1.0
! * h

ANew

I

LL
00
rer,

College
Helpmate

Suits at

$35

)

An ingenious invention which meets the4xactng require-
ments of college use. Simplified to overcome clogging
at the point and tedious mechanical manipulation.
Made economically by mass production methods and sold.
at prices that make wood pencils a luxury.
In models to suit every need-at prices to suit your purse.
Note these Advantages:
1 Lead guaranteed not to' clog at 4 New lead inserted in twenty
the tip. seconds.

definitely establish a new standard of clothes value at
this moderate price. Greater value than it has been pos-
sible to produce in years.
You'll appreciate the difference as soon as you see the
suits - months of service will confirm your first opinion.
Ready now.

OTHER FINE VALUES
$25, $30, $40, $45

2 Uses leads about double ordinary
length.
3 Point presses in for protection
when not in use.

$ Lead turns both in and out.
6 Holder can accommodate fifteen
extra leads, equal in writing ser-
vice to fifteen wood pencils.

rour stationery or cooperative store can show you these and otAer models.

"N I AT T T?

i'

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