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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 17, 1922 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-17

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DULLETIN

!urton Assur
Homeo Stud
Of Square

'eS LOCK CLUBS TO S111
e~^, iSCGOUT 'REIU' TONIGHTl

DAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1922

Number 97

"Vat I.

all students who have changed their address since
the office of the Dean of Students, Room 2, Univer-
hange of Address card.
J. A. BURSLEY, Dean of Students.
t Organizations:
Presidents of the'various student organizations is'
them about Jan. 16th asking that the office of the
plied with membership lists.
ich have not yet complied with this request should
mbers at once.
J. A. BURSLEY, Dean of Students.
t Monday and Friday at 10 o'clock, 204 S. W.
W. H.McLAUGHLIN.-

ce, Room 221 Engineering building, will be found a number of
nks from the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Com-
ttsburgh, Pa. These blanks should be filled out by all those
an early date. H. C. ANDERSON.
ts in Electrical Engineering:
;vall of the Class of 1921 will be in Ann Arbor from the 17th
the 22nd of February, inclusive. He will make his headquar-
lice. I advise that you talk with Mr. Bergvall, getting first
ons of, professional employment possibilities with the. West-,
tric & Mfg. Company. JOHN C. PARKER.
lish Club: '
xate English Club will meet tonight, Friday, Feb. 17, in Helen
idence at 8 p. m. sharp. Professor Hanford will talk 'to the
ne. NEIL E. COOK, President.
Series:
number in this series will be given in Hill Auditorium, Mon-
at 8 p. m., by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Ossip Gabri-
Luctor, Hans Kindler, 'Cellist. The following program will be
rture, "Donna Diana" (Reznicek); Symphony in D minor
icerto for Violoncello and Orchestra in C major, Op. 20 (d'Al--
Folk-Music Settings (a) Colonial Song, (b) Shepherd's Hey
he concert will be given on time and the doors will be closed-
rformance of numbers.
CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.

AT'S'GOINGi ON
FRIDAY
hway engineering confer.
eting in room 348' of Engi-
building.
xius B. Wood speaks in Uni-
Hall. "
idents' Press club luncheon
n.
ha Nu meets in University
ark club meetsi room 302
n.
duate English club meets at
ewberry residence.
Scout entertainment at
ltorium.
ing party at St. Thomas'
SATURDAY
ta Nn initiation in Univers.
isylvania club party in Un-
er Room Bible class meets
hall.
consin vs. Michigan basket-
ae.
tsmen meet at Masonic tem-
U-NOTICE
rw the Students' Press club
a today are on sale at
and the Union desk today.
,e is 75 cents. .

Know Your Alumni
(By Courtesy of Chimes)
Do you know:--
That Rohert Worth Bingham is a
famous newspaper publisher, that he
is now the editor of the Louisville
Courier Journal, succeeding the late
Henry Watterson-'Marie Henry" as
he used to be called, that he is the
founder of the famous Burley Tobacco
Growers' Ci-Operative association and
his name is dear to every tobacco man
in the state of Kentucky, and finally
and most important, that he is ..one
more of that famous 'group of Mich-
igan alumni, having graduated from
the Law school?
SCIENCE ACADEMY
MEETS IN MARCH
The Michigan Academy of Science
will hold its annual meeting on March
29 to 31 in Ann Arbor. '
The program will consist in part of
the presidential address of Prof. A. F.
Shull on,"The Factor of Safety .in Re-
search," and two other addresses, one
on "The Uses of Psychology," bf 3.
McKeen Cattell, the other on "The
Dutch lgast Indjes; the Land and the
People," by Prof. H. A. Brouwer, ex-
change professor from, Delft, Holland.
The complete program will be print-
ed and distributed previous to meet-
ings and will- include the titles .of
papers to be read before the sections
of agriculture, anthropology, botany,
economics, ;geology, psychology, san-
itary and medical science, and zoology.
The Academy of Science was organ-
ized in 1894. It "is-a means through
which those interested in the different
fi'Ids of science throughout the state
can be brought into closed touch with
the research and the work that is be-
ing done by others. For the most part
the different departments hold sep-
arate meetings.

"The faculty will not only stand
straight but will lean over backward
to help the students," is the manner in
which President Marion L. Burton
summed up his replies to the ques-
tions put to hipn by the homoeopathic
medical students at a meeting of all
the members of that college at 4:15
o'clock yesterday afternoon in the Un-
ion reading room.
Get Homoeopathic Degree
Dr. Burton explained in detail that
the degrees issued at the completion
.of a homoeopathic student's work
would show fully that the degree was
issued in homoeopathy and that the
clinic work and senior-year instruction
would conform to the best homoeo-
pathic standards in the countrq. He
concluded his remarks by reading a
letter addressed to the homoeopathic
students in whiclfhe summed up the
essence of what he had said.
Dean Cabot, of the Medical school,
followed President Burton, speaking
on'the general attitude of the faculties
of both medical schools on the merger,
and repeating President Burton.s
words as to the calibre of the senior
work that was to be given.
Would Take Time
He stated that some time would
probably be necessary before the com-
plete and perfect merging of the two
schools could be brought about and
that conflicting courses and hours
would be common in the next year, but
that in the near future the new plan
would be far superior to the former
one.
RZenwick Shows
Organ Iastery
(By 1. W. Gover)
Added interest was given to the Twi-
light organ recital by the appearance
of Mr. tlewellyn Renwick, formerly of
the School of Music faculty. His ex-
cellent program was opened by the
Bach Fugue in D minor, which he in-
fused with unusual sweep and power-
Faulkes, "Sonata in A minor," was
perhaps the outstanding 'number of
the program, the first movement, the
"Allegro Moderato," being the most
striking. This sonata called into full
play Mr. Renwick's mastery of his in-
strument. The Guilmant."Prayer" also
displayed his feeling for artistic val-
ues; this was the most delicate com-
position of the performance and was
interpreted with an adequate apprecia-
tion of its subtle atmosphere of sombre
neverence. The Widor "Toccata," from
the Fifth Symphony, formed a brilliant
climax and conclusion to the concert.
Mr. Renwick. also played two of his
own compositionswhih were well re-
ceived and gave evidence of his ver-
satility as artist and composer.
After the recital he was entetained
by his former associates at an Inform-
al dinner at the Union.
RAISE MONEY TO
AID IN RESEARCH
With an aim toward eliminating
the mechanical troubles caused by
inferior core oils, 280 foundries of the
state of Michigan are joining togeth-
er to raise $5,000 to be placed at the
disposal of the research division of
the Engineering school, according to
Prof. A. E. White, head of the engi-
neering research department.
Advice as to methods of purchase,
use and inspection will be offered at
the completion of the investigation.
.Beet sugar. refineries of the state are
also preparing to place the problem
of sugar preservation in the hands of
the engineering research department.
Lost through spoilage has been huge
in the refineries, and a method of safe
storage is sought.
STUDENTS LUNCH

Mleven acts of vaudeville will be
presented by the members of the Ro-
tary, Conopus,. and Kiwanis clubs in
their-dig Scouts' Revu at 8 .o'clock to-
night in Hill auditorium.
President Marion L. Burton, 'the
mayor of Ann Arbor, the superintend-
ent of schools, the president of the
Chamber of Commerce, and the presi-
dents of the three clubs, will take the
Scout oath and become honorary "ten-,
derfoot" snouts.
The proceeds of the Revu will* be
applied to the Scout budget which is
used to enlarge the scope of Boy Scout
work in Ann Arbor. At present there
are 246 scouts in the city, and an ef-
fort is being made to increase the
number to 800.
faculty' Plans 6
Extention Talks
Six lectures will be delivered today
and one tomorrow by members of the
faculty under the 'direction' . of the
University Extension- division. Prof.
L. J. Young, of the forestry depart-
ment, will speak today in Detroit on
"Michigan's Costly Mistake in Han-
dlijng Its Timber Resources."
E. E. Rovillain, of -the romance lan-
guage department, will deliver an 11-
ustrated lecture in Grand Rapids on
"Mexico, Old and New." ".The Trag-
edy of Habit" will be the' subject o0
Prof. J. R. Bruinm, of the rhetoric de-
partment, in his talk at St. Clair.1
Prof. Robert Craig, of the department
of forestry, will discuss "What the
Forest Produces" at Centreville..
Prof. W. D. Henderson, director of
the Extension division, will deliver
two addresses at Hart on "What Ah
Americanization" and./ "The Golden
Age of Tomorrow." Prof. C. S. Berry,
of the School of Education, will speak
tomorrow in Grand Rapids on ''Some
Problems in Americanization."
FEW PLACES ARE AVAILABLE
FOR DINNER DANCE TONIGHT
Many reservations have been made
for places at The regular Friday eve-
ning dinner dance in the main dining
room of the Union tonight.' A special
combination from the Union orches-
tra will furnish the music for the oc-
casion.

Students Taking
Heredity Just
Work For Credit
Credit in Zoology Sa, also *nown as
Heredity, will be earned physically
if nlot mentally by at least part of the
students enrolled in the course.
So many students elected this course
that every seat in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium was occupied at the'
first session of.the class and a largel
number remained standing in the
aisles and seated upon the steps. As
the only possible solution, seats will
be assigned upon the cement steps of,
the auditorium, it was announced
Thursday.
Rumors are afloat that this plan
will materially decrease the populari-
ty of the .ourse as far as the stu-
dents receiving the overflow seats are
concerned. Meanwhile, vendors of
cushions are rejoicing over the pros-
pect of added sales.
'23 DENTS GIVE FLAGPOLES
FOR ENTRANCE TO UNION
Two 18-foot flagpoles to be placed
near the walk in front of the Union
have been ordered and are expected to
be .shipped soon. They are the gift of
,dental 'students' of the crass of 1923.
The poles are designed to hold .the
Michigan colors and the colors of vis-
iting teams on days when athletic
contests take place here.
JUDGES SELECT SCENARIOS;
ANNOUNCE DECISION. SOON
Two scenarios were selected from4
the Univ.ersity movie by the official
judges at their meeting yesterday aft-
ernoon. No decision can be announced
till the end of the week, due to the ne-
cissity for submitting them to the
technical experts at the producers'J
studios for careful consideration and)
minor revisions.
Dance at C. of C. Inn. Wed., Fri,,
and Sat. nights. General admission.-
Adv.
Try a Daily Want Ad. It pays.-Adv

a ol
4 1WASTE YOUR
COIN OR
11 p,u SHALLYOU -
U1TE SURE
You GET
FULL-VALUE -
WK HEN a man or woman sets'
' out to get a plumbing job
done the first thing they
do is to make up their mind that
they won't be over-charged for it.
F And the second thing they do, if
they live in this town, is to look
up our address or telephone num-
ber. So, for your convenience
we're printing them in this ad.
B-e ranek
&Martin
320 S0. MAIN ST.,
Phone 2452

Dance and
B'a nq u e t
r ograms
. 'De Luxe
New Lines in
Paper Leather; Wood
and Celluloid
The
Mayer-Schairer
Company
12 South Main Street

I

A Relable Jeweler
C HAPMAN
118 South Main

'I,., -- . 1

.., A

I

SECOND SEFESTER

TE XT

BOOKS

New and Second Hand

ENGINEE&S' SVPPL IES
LAB OUTFITS, Etc.
WAHR'SBOKSTORE

rA

SWIMMING
?T ON TUESDAY
asday night at- 7:15 o'clock
ss swimming meet will take
e Y. M. C. A. pool. The pre-
will be held that night and
owing Thuisday the fiials
n off. All classes, are to
ad anyone can come down
for his class. Five points
for first place, three fox
d one is counted for third.
ints will be given to the
ng the relay race. Events
those included in the reg-
rn intercollegiate meets.
dive will also be held.
ividual who wins five points
ey on which are his class
No man is allowed to en-
han three events. Swim-
e winning relay team will
>ints toward their five to
merals.

t"titfll/ kffi~~i.l/1tfl/!/~/.ilkkiik"4.....i/ ik"ttti/tl!!/Rt i ! //1*S . . . fl ltltlk~ff"ti.!"""~ii l"~/f"//a lt t..t!.. /..

0

Spring Clothin1g--

BISHOP JONES -DISCUSSES
VALUE OF APPLYING GOSPEL
"Of what value is the gospel that
the churches are teaching?" were the
words with which Bishop Paul Jones
opened his talk on the subject: What
I's the First Century Gospel Worth
Today, in the Upper Room of Lane
hall at 7:30 o'clock last night. "Mod-
ern application or lack of application,
of the gospel is exactly the opposite
of what was intended," the r Bishop
stated,
BERGTALL VISITS CITY TO
INTERVIEW '22 ENGINEERS
R. C. Bergvall, '21E, who is now with
the Westinghouse Electric and Manu-
facturing company, will be in the
city until Feb. 22 for the purpose of
interviewing senior electrical engi-
neers who may desire to secure em-
ployment with the organization. Mr.

- 409 EAST JEFFERSON.

now being displayed by us. :- Step in and see the
latest creations in Snappy "GOLFERS"
"SPORTERS" "TOWNCOTES" etc., in
beautiful tweeds and pencil-stripes.
Lindenschmitt- ApfeI & Co
Stein- INlockand ihaels-Stern Clothes
209 SOUTH MAIN. STREET

OPEN 6:30 A. M.
TILL 11:00 P. M.

'.fA J iiiliiitl iiitii altiiii~i tltii~liffi iiii~liiili~i7i i t iti i i iii

'serussassnsusssuuunuu..nuss ...snua....uuu.nn....n.u. n...

.

rl ' F
5 . i a. w

RGER RETURNS FROM
H'S STUDY IN MUSEUMS
nburger, of the zoology de-
f the University, who has
ining museum collections
gton, and in Philadelphia,
st month, has returned to

REMOVE "THE DANGER

I

1ii

;

Step into either of our offices and look over our
Safety Deposit Vault Equipment
You will feel at ease knowing your valuables are
safely deposited in your individual box behind

H E
GREY
,HO

three weeks in Washing,
g snakes belonging to the
aus (blue racers, black
whip snakes).' The re-
the time was spent at the
L Academy of Sciences, in
study of the specimens

Bergvall's visit is preliminary to a
.later one by an officer of the com-
pany, who will be in the city during
the latter part of March.

0

those massive doors
THE COST IS NOMINAL

Have your Noon
Lunch at the
Grey Shop

I

I

ii

Board of Regents Will Meet Feb. 24
- The next meeting of the Board a1
Regents will be held on Friday, Feb.
24, in the Regents' room in the law

f

i

I. ,.s.

Ibull

r FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
101-105 South Mati Street. 3830 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)

600 E Liberty

Hot Sp

11Q Tbli

r-y

i

I

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