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February 16, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-16

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ASSOCIAI

DAY;AEDI NIGHT
l9 '1TCN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1922

PRIOR

:B BONUS
TION STILL
T IN DOUBTI

-Hop Chimes freaks Sales Records
And Offers Well- Written Articles

COMMITTEES
[LL HARDING
VIEWS

MARRING
GIVES'

NT DEFINITELY
T TAX PROGRAM
osals Discussed by Men
or of inclusion in
Tax Bill
n, Feb. 15.-The soldier
on was tonight still very

Congress was without any official.
word in President Harding as to his,
views on the. subject, and meantime
the committees which have been
handling the problem are continuing1
to mark time.
Among senators and representatives
generally there was considerable dis-
cussion and conjecture with the reviv-
al on the house 'side of talk about a
clashing of annual appropriation bills
as a means of providing the necessary
finances for the bonus.
With the executive known to look
with disfavor on either the suggested
eight point tax program or a bond
issue- sales tax proponents pushed
their campaign with renewed vigor
and were undrstood to have been
well satisfied with the progress made.'
They were said to be hopeful that the
President would suggest this kind of
a tax in his expected comnunication
to Chairman McCumber of the senate
finance committee.
ALL,- NTIONS' T0DIL
SCEDL ED FO A
'SEVEN COUNTRIES TO BE REPRE-
SENTED ON VARIED
PROGRAM
Seven nationalities will be includ-
ed on the program of the All-Nations'
Vodvil, the entertainment sponsored
by the Cosmopolitan club, the date of,
which has been announced as March
4)
Thus far the program, partially
drawn up, contains some of the best
acts that have ever been on by mem-
hers of the club in 'the annual per-
formance, according to Edwin Beres-
ford, '22, in charge of the work this
year. All of the acts will be given by
the different sections of the club in
the -native costume of the country rep-
resented. Thus, the management aims
to show the dress and customs of for-
eign lands.'
-An Hawaiian act will be among the
leaders on the bill for the evening,
while acts under the Japanese club
and tire Chinese club will furnish a
glimpse of some real Oriental acting.
An Indian sword act, which has been
arranged, will probably furnish the
thrills of the evening. Music and
dancing, both of which will represent
the arts of the foreign worlds, will be
included, on the program.
Dutch Cellist Is
Con cert Soloist
Of especial interest to lovers of
music will be the 'final concert of the
Extra Concert series to be given in
Hill auditorium next Monday evening,
Feb. 20. At this concert Hans Kin-
dler, one of the 'world's greatest 'cell-
ists, will be present, with the Detroit
Symphony.ochestra, as soloist. Though
only 30 years of age, the Dutch artist
has won deserved and universal repu-
tation as a master of his instrument,
playing with color and real sympathy
the most difficult works. He is de-
clared by Samuel Pierson Lockwood,
of the School of Music, to the the
world's greatest 'cellist.
The program to be given is as fol-
lows:
Overture, "Donna Diana'"...Reznicek
Symphony in D minor......Franck
Intermission
'Cello Concerto, d'Albert, Hans Kindler
British. Folk Song Settings..Graiger
(a) Colonial Song
(b) Shepherd's Hey
DEANS SATISFIED WITH
CONDUCT OF 198 J-HOP
Satisfaction over the conduct
and management of the J-Hop
was expressed by the deans in
their conference which was held
yesterday morning in the office
of the President.
The official statement issued
was that the Junior Hop was
entirely satsfactor and was a,

Breaking all previous sale records,
the J-Hop issue of Chimes had pass-
ed the 1,000 mark by late yesterday
afternoon.
Variety of content was the outstand-
ing feature of the February Chimes.1
With an attractive cover in three
colors, depicting a scene at the J-Hop,
and an issue full of interesting fea-
tures, the campus awoke to the fact
that there was something good on the
campus that bore investigation.
In the past, Chimes sales have been
below 900. Yesterday, however, more
than 1,000 copies had been sold by
late afternoon, very few extra copies
remaining.
Shows Fine Effort
Taken as a whole, the J-Hop num-
ber of the Chimes shows a splendid
effort ,of the staff to put out a maga-
zine of first quality and they have
succeeded in producing an issue
worthy of representing Michigan
among like college monthlies of the
country. Taking its name from the
social function of last week, the
monthly devoted a laige share of Its
space to"the discussion af the J-Hop,
past and present.
HI6HNIY CONFERENCE
CONTINUES SESSIONS
ROAD SURFACES AND DRAINAGE
DISCUSSED AT MEETINGS
YESTERDAY
,fRoad surfaces, drainage, and snow
removal were the topics discussed dur-
ing yesterday's meetings of the
eighth annual conference on highway
engineering, which is being held here
this week under the auspices of the
college of engineering of the Univer-
sity. Gov. Alexander J. Grosbeck ad-'
dressed Tuesday evening's smoker at
the Union.
Today's meetings will. be devoted
largely to the interests of the road
commissioners of the state.
Governor Groesbeck's talk was
largely a review of the work of the
state administrative board, which was
formed during his administration.
Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard, of the
highway engineering department, pre-
sided over yesterday morning's meet-
ing. Paul D. Sargent, chief engineer
of the Maine state highway commis-
sion, discussed bituminous surfacing
of gravel roads. State investigations
with regard to dust prevention on
gravel roads, and the preservation of
road surfaces, were the topics treat-
ed by Prof. Herschel C. Smith, of the
highway engineering department of
the University.
Charles M. Upham, state highway
engineer of North Carolina, compared
sub-drainage of roads by deep side
ditches and tile drains, at the after-
noon meeting. Charles J. Bennett,
Connecticut state highway commis-
sioner, discussed organization, man-
agement, and methods of snow re-
moval from country roadways.
M'atinee Program
wShows Technique
And Varied Skill
(By 3. Frances O'Hara)
Exact technical skill, a tone finely
drawn and precise,.and absolute clar-
ity distinguished the Bach-Tausig Toc-
cata and Fugue as played by Miss Ava
Comin at the Matinee Musicale,, yes-
terday afternoon at the Union. Equal-
ly good was Miss Comin's interpreta-
tion of the Chopin numbers: Noc-
turne, opus 72, No. 1, and Ballade, opus
47, the latter wining particular favor
in its delicately beautiful melody,
which gradually leads to a brilliant
ending.
Miss Ensworth charmed her listen-
ers with her warm, flowing voice. The
skill of a well schooled singer was
evinced by her singing of "Lungi dal
Caro Bene" by Secci, while "Fulfill-
ment" proved her ability to touch the
imagination of her audience.
Variety was added to the program

by the selections of the Glee and Man-
dolin club. "At the'Brook" by the
Mandolin club was thoroughly enjoy-
ed. The clever "Ole Uncle Moon" cap-
tivated the audience as the favorite se-
lection of the Glee club.
As aconipanist, Gage E. Clark, '22,
gave proof of excellent ability.

Admitting at the outset the excep-
tionally poor quality of the fiction
contained in the issue, which shows
plainly either the scarcity of good
writers on the campus, or their re-
luctance to aid the efforts of the
Chimes staff, the issue more than com-
pensates its readers in the excellent
and timely articles that compose the
bulk of its reading matter.
Reviews Arms Conference
"Great Men at the Arms Confer-
ence," by Herbert S. Case, which opens
the issue is a lively review of the im-
pressions of- the Japanese delegates
to the conference as seen by Yasaka
Takagi, a Michigan graduate student.
The side-lights the article throws on
the big men of the Arms confrence
are instructive and entertaining. Be-
low this article in box form are the
names of the Michigan men at the
conference /including that of "Prof.
Rene Talamon, of the French depart-
ment.
Then the article by Earl D. Babst,
'91, reviving old Michigan memories,
which though entertaining, is obscur-
ed more or less in the traditional haze
which seems to feature all stories of
the days that used to be. Mr. Babst
creates an interest which he fails to
satisfy, although his evident intimate
association with our present mentors
in their youthful college days is some-
thing to awaken interest.
"The Black Sheep Baas," by G. D.
E., points out the astounding ignor-
ance of the men who are guiding our
litergry thought through the columns
of the daily papers and, 'hints, rather
broadly, at a like incompetency in our
American universities.
Review Olio State
Passing from these more serious
articles, the reader has an opportunity
to view another, university through
eyes that are familiar with its life and
work. "Ohio State," by M. Bowerman,
Jr., the first of a seires of four critical
surveys of other schools which Chimes
proposes to make, serves its purpose
but incompletely. Then George E.
Sloan's "Half a Century of J-Hop His-
tory," is a complete review of the es-
tablishment and working of this func-
tion. "On Ice-Michigan's Hockey
Prospects" is another article which
ranks equally with the preceding one
in both its treatment and value.
Finally two pages of timely photo-
graphs, an editorial section which
tells all about Chimes, and a cever
book review by R. D. S., make this last
issue one of worth while interest tol
the campus at large.
Renwick To Give,
T'wilight Recital

OPERA OPENS NEW
THEA TER FRIDAY
"Make It For Two" Seat Sale Starts
at Union Playhouse This
Morning
PROF. H. A. KENYON TO GIVE
TALK BEFORE CURTAIN RISES
Formalities at the grand opening of
the Mimes Union theater tomorrow
night will include a dedicatory address
by Prof. H. A. Kenyon, of the romance
language department. Professor Ken-
yon will speak briefly before the cur-
tain rises at 8:15 o'clock on the
Union opera, "Make It For Two,"
which is billed for the opening of the
new theater. Committees working on
the opening plan to make the occa-
sion a gala affair, the opera perform-
ance to be only one of the features
of the evening's performance.
Mimes Quartette to Sing
Between acts the Mimes q'uartette,
composed of Albert F. Schirmer, '22E,
Thomas I. Underwood, ,'23L, Paul
Wilson, '23L, and Lloyd Kemp, '22,
will sing "Michigan 'Memories," the
song that made the biggest hit with
alumni while the show was on the
road.
Every seat in the house will be re-
served, which obviates the necessity
of any line forming for the 500 seats
tomorrow evening. The ticket sale
will, open at 10 o'clock this morning
at the Mimes theater box office, which
can be conveniently reached either
from State street or Jefferson street.
The sale will be continuous until the
performance begins.
Final Touches Added
A large force of stage hands was,
busy yesterday puttin'g up the new
scenery, and adding the final touches
to make the theater complete for the
opening. Both front curtains of the
opera will open in the middle and
draw to either side, instead of being
raised into the.loft. The latter method
had to- be followed in some of the ci-
ties in which the opera played on
tour, showing that the Mimes theater
has stage facilities equal to those in
the larger theaters.
WOOD TO SPEAK AT
PRESS CLUB LUNCH

HARRY A. FRANCK, '03, WHO LEC-
TURES TONIGHT IN HILL AUDI-
TORIUM ON .HIS EXPERIENCES
IN SOUTH AMERICA.
HARRY A FRANOK
SPEAKS TONI1GHT

Well Known Traveler Gives Talk
Oratorical Association Lecture
Course

on

War Correspondent, Michigan
uate, Talks Friday

Grad-

L. L. Renwick, an alumnus and for
many years a member of the faculty
of the School of Music, will give a re-
cital at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon on
the memorial organ in Hill auditor-
ium, on the regular Thursday twilight
organ series.
Mr. Renwick supplemented his
American training by extensive study
abroad and for a period of three years
was .organist at the American church
in Paris. Upon his return he was
head of the organ department of the
School of Music, later resigning to en-
gage in his profession in Detroit. Since
that time he has appeared in recital
at Ann Arbor May festivals and in
many other cities of the state and of
the Middle West.
His program will be as follows:
Fugue in D minor ............Bach
Prayer...................Guilmant
Sonata in A minor.........Faulkes
Allegro moderato - Andante -
Allegro moderato
Evening Song............Renwick
Marche Humoresque........Renwick
Toccata (Fifth Symphony).... Widor
WIEMAN SPEAKER AT DETROIT
U. OF X. CLUB LUNCH TODAY
Elton E ("Tad") Wieman, '21, as-
sistant football coach, will be the prin-
cipal speaker at the regular Thursday
noon lunch of the University of Mich-
igan club of Detroit, to be held this
noon in the Palm room of the Cadil-
lac hotel.f
Wieman will give a short resume of
the events of the past season and will
outline the prospects for the coming
season as they appear at this early
date. He will also touch upon the
athletic situation at the University as
compared with that at other univer-
sities in the country.
Australian Speaker Here Saturday
Senator, the Right Honorable G. F.
Pearce, minister for home and terri-
tories, the commonwealth of Austra-
Iia, will deliver his lecture entitled
"Our Common Interests in the Pact-
fic" on Saturday night, Feb. 18, un-
der the auspices of the Oratorical as-
sociation.
A. S. X..E. to Meet Tonight
Members of the student branch of
the A. S. M. E. will hold a business
meeting at 7:30 o'clock this evening
in room 229 Engineering building. All
activA memhrs nr nergA to attAnd

Returning to the University after
more than 20 years of service as a re-
porter and war correspondent in
every part of the world, Junius B.
Wood, '00, will deliver two addresses
here Friday on his experiences dur-
ing the World war and the recent
Armament conference. The first ad-
dress will be given at 11 o'clock in
the morning in University Hall.
While his talk will be of special
value to students interested in jour-
nalism, his close connection with
world events of the pa'st few years
gives assurance that the speech will
also be of interest to those who are
not concerned with tthe technical as-
pects of newspaper work.
Mr. Wood will be the guest of the
Students' Press club at a luncheon
at 12:15 o'clock in the Union, and will,
give a short speech following the,
luncheon. The luncheon is open to
all who wish to attend, whether mem-
bers of the club or not. Tickets are
on sale at Wahr's and at the Union
desk. The price is 75 cents.
BISHOP JONES OF UTAH TO
SPEAK AT S. C. A. TONIGHT
Bishop Paul Jones, representing
the Fellowship of Reconciliation, will.
speak at 7:30 o'clock tonight at Lane
hall on the subject, "What Is a First
Century Gosp~el Worth Today?" in
which he will attempt to show that
the solution of present industrial and
international troubles rests on Chris-
tian principles.
Bishop Jones is now making a tour
of the country, and has recently ad-
dressed students of various universi-
ties on the co-operative movement,
the industrial revolution, the Wash-
ington conference, and on other simi-
lar topics.
Ford Has. Contpetitor
Washington, Feb. 15-Entry of the,
Alabama Power company today in the
list of bidders for the government
property at Muscle Shoals was re-
garded by officials as offering formid-
able rivalry to Henry .Ford's proposal
now before congress.'
Alumnus Not Out This Week
The Alumnus will not make its cus-
tomary weekly appearance today due
to the final examinations and the be-
ginning of the new semester. The
next issue will be that 'of Feb. 23.
Parnall 'in New York
Dr. C. G, Parnall, director of the
University hospital, left yesterday aft-
Arnnn for sveral dav' stav in New

HAS SPE1 T MOST OF LIFE
VAGABONDING AROUND WORLD
Harry A. Franck, '03, who will de-
liver his lecture, "Oriental South
America," "at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium ,under the auspices of
the University Oratorical association,
has "safely earned the reputation of
being the greatest and the most
unique American traveler."
Started as Student
Mr. Franck has spent his life in
searching out interesting people and
learning their peculiarities at first
hand. Starting while a student in
eollege, he hoboed his way around the
United ,States during the vacation
periods, paying his way by doing work
as a carpenter, harvest hand, and cel-
lar digger. During one of these trips
he crossed the Atlantic on a cattle-
boat with only $3.18 in his possession,
but yet by working here and there he
managed to visit Londoil, Paris, and
arrived back for school but two weeks
late.
Since leaing school, Mr. Franck
has wandered around the entire
world, mostly on foot. In this way he
covered in four 'years more than 5,000
miles. on his trip through South
America and gained the experiences
upon which his talk will be based. His
books have received recognition and
are characteristic of his life: "A Vag-
abond Journey Around the World,"
"Four Months Afoot in Spain," "Vag-
abonding Down the Andes" and
'Roaming Through the West Indies."
Helped in Hayti Difficulty
It is said that Mr. Franck's writings
concerning the affairs a's they 'eally
existed in Hayti materially helped to
clear the situation caused by the al-
leged indiscriminate killing by the
American Marines in the Black Re-
public.
Prof. A. G. Canfield, of the romance
language department, will give a din-
ner in honor of Mr. Franck, following
which he will introduce the speaker
at the lecture..
ATHLETES WILL BE
TENDERED BANQUET
Chicago and 'Wisconsin Teams Will
Be Honor Guests Saturday Night
Members of the Chicago and Michi-
gan track teams and the Wisconsin
and Michigan basketball teams will be
entertained at a dinner at 8:30 o'clock
Saturday night in the main dining
room of the Union.
The entertainment and dinner will
be on the order of that tendered the
Cornell track team last year and will
be open to the campus at large
through the sale of 150 tickets to stu-
dents at $1.50 each. .
Alonzo A. Stagg, director of athlet-
ics at Chicago, and Fielding H. Yost
will be the principal speakers of the
evening. Mimes will furnish the en-
tertainment.
The dinner follows the track meet
with Chicago in the afternoon and the
basketball game; with Wisconsin at
night and the visiting athletes togeth-
er with the Varsity squads will be the
honor guests of the evening.
The committee in charge of ar-
rangements consists of: M. R. Norcop,
'23L, chairman; D. H. Van Horn, '22,
and George Barnes, '24. Tickets will
be sold to the camus by an addition-

SENATOR CHARGES
THAT ELLON IS
ASSERTS SECRETARY OF TREA
URY COULD BE 11-
PEACHED
OFFICIAL'S ENGAGING
IN BUSINESS CRIMINA
Stewart Cites Withdrawal Before Si
'iar Attack of Nominee
Under Grant
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 15. - Secrete
Mellon is holding the office of sc
tary of the treasury in violation of I
law and can be arrested for retaini
the place if anyone sees fit to sw
out a warrant charging him with )
offense, Senator Watson, Democr
Georgia, declared in the senate l
today.
The law which Mr. Mellon is viol
Ing, Mr. Watson said, prohibits to
secretary of the treasury from engi
ing in any kind of business or co
mnerce.
Impeachable at Any Time
Senator Watson told the senate t
"Mr. Mellon could be impeached a
time we see fit" and read to the s
ate the provision of section 243 of I
revised statues which, he declar
expressly forbids- Mr. Mellon from
taing his place. He declared that
staying in office, the secref'ary
violating the law, adding that it v
generally known that Mr. Mello _
one of the wealthiest individuals
the country.
Law Now Listed in Statutes
The assertion by the Georgia se
tor was made in connection with si
eral speeches on the accomplishme
of the two major political parties.
informed the senate in the course
his remarks that the law, now lis
as section 243, was passed in the f
congress in the United States and t
during the administration of Presid
Grant the name of A. C. Stewart h:
been withdrawn as the nominee as s
retary of the treasury when attent
'was called to provisions of the act
SCENARIO IUOBFES E
Scripts to Be Finally Considered
Conference Today
All judges for the University mo
scenario contest will meet this aft
noon for consideration of the scri
submitted in the recent contest of 'I
Daily. It is hoped that a final. de
sion can be made today and annou
ed tomorrow morning.
If satisfactory material is found
the judging committee work will
started at once on the actual prodi
tion of the picture. A cast of ch
acters will be selected from the a
dent body and the filming of local c
or scenes will be continued by 1
producers' camera men.
LISTS FOR DAILY DIRECTORY
MUST BE IN BEFORE FEB. 28
Students who haye entered theU
versity the second semester or wh
addresses have been changed si
the publication'of the Students' dir
tory will be listed in a special supp
mentary directory to be published
The Daily in the near future. Th
who wish tobe included in the V
should send in their names, addres
and telephone numbers to the Dir
tory Editor before'Feb. 28. The
formation should be listed in the I
lowing manner:

CLIP THIS COUPON

( Name .................... ...
Class...................
Address .. .............
Phone .........................
Home .....................
If a, correction please note old
I address or mistake to be cor-
I
I rected...................
Mail the coupon to directory
( editor, The Michigan Daily, Press
I building, before Feb. 28.
Sigma Delta Chi Meets Tonight
Sigma Delta Chi, national prof4
sional journalistic fraternity, w
hold the first meeting of the semes
at 7:30 o'clock this evening att' I
Union. Plans for the semester will
outlined and a program of the wo

SPANISH SOCIETY
POSTPONED

LECTURE
UNTIL FEB.

23

"A Pilgrimage Through Spain," the !
lecture which was to have been given
by Prof. Charles P. Wagner, of the
Spanish department, today in Tappan
hall, has been postponed until Thurs-
day, Feb. 23, in order to give way for
the Oratorical association lecture by
Mr. Harry A. Franck. However, there
will be a short business meeting of all
members of La Sociedad Hispanica at
.7 ,. +L_,_.. A .7,7.,1 .; .. -,,...

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