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February 14, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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hand Books bought and sold
s University Bookstore.-Adv.
pALDIN G
Basket Ball
When purchasing equip-
ment for basket ball or
any athletic sport,insist
upon SPALDING'S. Sat.
isfaction is inevitable.
Catalogue on requnat
SPALDING & BROS.
1 So. State St., Chicago

BASEBALL NOTICE
All infield and outfield candi-
dates report at Waterman gym-
nasium Wednesday at 1 o'clock.
Battery men are now practicing.
RAY FISHER.
Learn the secrets of the Street in
Earl D. Babst's article, "From State
Street to Wall Street" in February
Chimes. Babst is the sugar king. He
graduated in the Class of '93.-Adv.
Loose leaf note books-"The Stand-
ard" at Wahr's University Bookstore.
-Adv.,

BATTERY MEN TURN OUT
FOR INITIAL WORKOUT
HURLERS AND RECEIVERS BEGIN
LIMBERING UP FOR
BASEBAL
With the opening of the second se-
mester Coach Fisher's battery men
have started work in earnest. Al-
though somewhat handicapped by the
absence of the net, more than 25 bat-
tery men reported for practice in Wat-
erman gymnasium yesterday after-
noon.

the workmen have been unable to com-
plete the raising of the huge cage, but
it will in all probability be ready by
the latter part of the week. Owing
to the lack of the net as protection, the
coach is working only with the bat-
tery candidates, but he plans as soon
as possible to get all his men limber-
ing up.
Many Hurlers Out
Coach Fisher is quite enthusiastic
over his supply of pitchers. There
were 17 hurlers reported yesterday
afternoon including Liverance, Dixon,
and Shultz, the three mainstays of last
year's nine. Among the catchers work-
ing out yesterday were Captain Ernie
Vick, Coates and Blott, the latter of the
1921 yearling squad. Roby, substitute
backstop in 1921, has not reported for
practice as yet but is expected to do
so soon.
Second hand Books bought and sold
at Wahr's University Bookstore.-Adv.
tE

Cage
Because of

Ready Soon
the J-Hop decorations

_ .r . the. ..-Honv dec vvs141 i10
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a

VALUES FOR THE, MAN IN COLLEGE !

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* U
lwysth avrie it
Mihia Me.
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* U
EM*
* BBB PIPESLH O
" Standard of the.world and
* always the favorite with *M
* Ichiga Men.
SWe have been Ann Arbor a
E* distributors for sixteen *
las Pipes and Pipe re- a
paIrs a specialty. U
- - 1k
* 11LAItU)S CIGAIIS CANDIES
* ~PIPES LUNCHES SODAS *
* " ttwry to tireat you wight" W3

MURFIN 9ADVOCATES
CHANGE IN RULES
Regent Would Allow Regular Students
To Take- Part in Summer
Baseball
PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL
IS JUDGED DIFFERENTLY
Detroit, Feb. 13.-The rule prohibit-
ing summer baseball in colleges mere-
ly makes liars of university men and
aboltion of it would do away with ath-
letic sandals, in the opinion of James
0. Murfin of Detroit, a regent of the
University of Michigan.
Whethr a man has played profes-
sional football or baseball should not
be considered in deciding his collegiate
athletio eligibility, according to Mur-
fin. He maintained in a statement to
The Associated Press tonight that the
one test of a man's eligibility should
be:
"Is he a bona fide student in good
standing?"
A student should not be permitted
to engage in professional sports while
actually in school because it would
interfere with his class work, but what
he does during vacations is no one's
business but his own, Murfin declared.
Times Have Clanged
"When the summer baseball rule
was adopted 25 or 30 years ago, it was
aimed to prevent colleges from hiring
'ringers' to represent them on the
gridiron," he continued. "Since that
time the precaution has become unne-
cessary because of adoption of one-
year residence rule and the rule that
an athlete must be up in his classes.'
When the reason for a rule ceases
to exist the rule should be abolished.
This is the case with the summer
baseball rule. G
First pictures of the Hop and its
headliners in the February Chimes.-
Adv.
Moose leaf note books---"The Stand-
ard" at Wathr's Univrsity Bookstore.
-Adv.

"Students should be permitted to
play professional baseball during the
summer to earn money for college ex-
penses. A young man may give les-
sons during the summer and be eligi-
ble to play on the college baseball
team. But let him play professional
ball and he is barred. I would rather
a son of mine should play the nation-
al game to defray his expenses through
school than become a dance master or
play in an orchestra.
"Professional baseball men today are
among the cleanest morally and physi-
cally, to be found anywhere. They
have to -be in order to last in base-
ball.
Divide Into Classes
"Athletes should be divided into
three classes, instead of two. These
should be professional, amateur and
collegiate. Because an athlete has
been, a professional at one time in his
life should not bar him from college
sports if he is scholastically eligible.
The summer baseball rule is winked
at everywhere. College athletes do
not remain amateurs under the rule.
They become liars. The men revolt
at a rule that is absurd and silly."
Murfin declared professional foot-
ball should be judged in a different
light from professional baseball be-
cause the former sport is played in
the fall and that participation in it by
college players would interfere with
their scholastic work. He declared,
however,-that men who had played
professional football and later entered
college should NOT be barred from
the Varsity squad if they met the
other requirements.
TRYOUTS NOTICE
Tryouts for baseball manager re-
port at Watprman gymnasium at
12:45 o'clock today.
H. W1L ON, Manager.
Loose leaf note books-The Stand-
ard" at Wahr's University Bookstore.
-Adv.
The only complete history of the
J-Hop ever printed appears in the
February Issue of the Chimes.-Adv.

f

-Adv.

y+ Copyright 1921 Hart Schaffner & Marx

Finest Winter Suits

End-of-the-Season Clearance

$16.50

$21.50
They're Hart Schaffner
and other fine makes;
fabrics; newest patterns

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There are many suits in these two
groups, among them some of the
finest of our winter stock. In an
effort to dispose of them imme-
diately we've marked them at
prices far below actual worth.

& Marx
all-wool
and col-

orings; smartest styles; superbly
tailored. By far the greatest val-
ues this institution has ever given.

-,..._

Big Warm Overcoats
Hart Schaffner & Marx'and Others

at $23.50

No man need pay more th'an $23.50 for a fine winter over-
coat: We'll prove it with these big warm ones now on sale.
Rough, shaggy weaves and smooth finished fabrics; plain,
plaid or contrasting backs; in grays and browns. A great
assortment.h.

Spring Has Cme
To Our omens Department
Winter weary women are being thrilled these days, by
first glimpses in our- Women's Department and the daily
arrival in Exclusive Apparel are indeed thrilling.
The new Tweed Suits, handsome Street Frocks and
those ever interesting Spring Hats.

Reule Conlin Fiegel Co.
MAIN ST. AT WASHINGTON, ANN ARBOR

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