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February 14, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-14

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 14. 1922 PRIG

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rSPAPER ASSERTS
CIVIL WAR IMMINENT.
nd Belfast Rioting Continues;
ihooting Occurs Over Ex-
tended Area
(By Associated Press)4
Ion, Feb. 13.-The Irish situa-
ver the Ulster border has stead-
come worse and no secret has
made of the grave alarm with
it is viewed in official circles
ston Spencer Churchill, secre-
or the colonies, declared in the
of commons today that the
ng of the Ulster special consta-
Clones has greatly aggrevated
;uation.
Evening Standard asserts that
d is on the brink of civil war
notes members of the govern-
is saying that while,;the govern-
hesitates to do anything which
Feiners could purport as provo-
swift military 'preparations
been made to prevent an arm-
rasion of Sermanagh and Ty-
he light of the development of
st few days much significance is
ed to the suspension today of
acuation of British troops from
ern Irish ports. The Irish of-
:plained that the suspension Was
d pending a decision regarding
tent of the reinforcements to
it to Ulster. Sir James Craig,
premier, announced tonight that
later garrison of British troops'
ibe increased from 10 battalions
week-end rioting in Belfast was
ued today, the death roll from
lay being 12 killed, 20 or more
led. The curfew was re-impos-
ight. The shooting affairs in
t during the last 24 hours occur-
Vre a idely exanded area.
riety Is Keynote'
Of Chimes Issue

MOORE APPOINTED
UNION PRESIDENT'
Edward F. Moore, '22E, was named
president of the Union for the re-
mainder of the year at a meeting of
the board of directors last week. The
action was made necessary by the res-
ignation of R. Emerson Swart, '22E.
Moore was vice-president of the
Union from the engineering college
before his appointment to the presi-
dency. He will assume his new du-
ties immediately. His position as
vice-president will be taken by Ed-
'mund H. Fox, '22E, formerly gen-
eral chairman of the dance commit-
tee.
Moore will have his ofilce hours in
the president's office in the student
activities room on the third floor of the
Union from 5 to 5:30 o'clock on Mon-
days and Fridays, and from 4 to 5:30
o'clock on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
.MIMES THEATER-
Only: Men to Be Admitted at Grand
Opening Performance on
Friday Night
SHOW TO INITIATE WEEK-END
PRODUCTIONS OF ALL TYPES
/ "Make It For Two," the 1922 Union
opera, has been scheduled as the at-
traction at the formal opening of the
Mimes Union theater Friday night.
The full cast that appeared in Ann
Arbor for a week during December
and made the road trip through the
Middle West during Christmas vaca-
tion will again play to a student audi-
ence in the new Union theater just
north of the Union.
Original Effects Used
The complete costume and scenic
effects of the opera as first played
will again appear. The special dances,
the full musical comedy orchestra
led by Kemp Keena, and all the muli-
cal numbers that were worked out
during the opera performances will be
included.
The new theater was used for re-
hearsals of the opera during the
fall following complete reconstruc-
tion during the summer and early fall
months. Its stage is', of regulation
size, dressing rooms are provided for
the cast and chorus, and complete
stage equipment including curtains,
drops, an4 orchestra pit have been
constructed.
The performance will be open only
to men. The ticket sale will be. an-
nounced later. The capacity of the
house is 500 people.
Change of Casts Planned
The opera, performance will initiate
a series of week-end entertainments
under the auspices of Mimes, honor-
ary Union dramatic organization, to be
continued until the end of the year.
Plays aid shows of all kinds have
been arranged and new casts will ap-
pear in each production. Admission
rates will depend upon costs of pro-
duction.

RE[SIGNS POSI1TION
Nyra B. Jordan's Withdrawal Accepted
With Regret by Board of.
Regents
HUSBAND ALSO RETIRES FROM
HIS POSITION IN LIBRARY
Myra B. Jordan, who has been Dean
of Women in the University for the
past 20 years, and Frederick P. Jor-
dan, assistant librarian at the general
library, tendered their resignations to
the Board of Regents at its last meet-
ing, to take effect at the end of the
school year. The resignations have
been accepted with regret.
Ill Health Responsible
The resignations were made neces-
sary by the continued ill 'health of the
dean, and the fact that Mr. Jordan has
now reached the age of retirement
from service to the University. On
completion of their duties at the end
of the school year they expect to
ttavel in Europe, spending the great-
er part of the winter in home.
Dean Jordan received her Bachelor
of Arts degree from the University
in 1893 and assumed her position as
Dean of Women in 1902 when onlA40
girls were enrolled. At this time thre
were only four women in the United:
States who held positions as deans.
Organizes League Houses
Conditions in the University then
were such that men and women lived
in the same rooming houses. Since
that time Dean Jordan has been instru-
mental in organizing league houses
for women and it has been one of her
foremost ideas, during her 20 years of
successful work, to better the living
conditions and establish self-govern-
met in women's houses, .Dean Jor-
dan has also been interested in schoL-
arship loans for women which have in-
creased from $40 in 1902 to $24,000 at
the present time, excluding the Bar-
bour scholarship.
Mr. Jordan Serves Long
Mr. Jordan has been cnneoted with
the Library since 1887, occupying;, the
position of head classifier during most,
of the period. He has has general'
charge Of all the cataloguing in fe
bujlding and the present system em-
ployed is largely the result of hia
work.
He studied at the University of Leip-
zig for two years before coming to the
University in 1887 to take his posi-
tion. His stdies there were chiefly
mathematics and thelanguages, the
result of his training being his ability
at the present time tq speak and read
in more than seven languages.
"What the University will do with-
out Mr. Jordan I do not know," was
the statement made yesterday by Li-
brarian W. W. Bishop. "His almost
unlimited knowledge of history, lan-
guages, and literature cannot be re-
placed."

Resigns Position

content will mark the
ue of Chimes, which ap-
de iJ the campus tomor-
ticles varying ini subject
rnament conference to a
f literature will be corn
wide assortment of fiction
The cover is a three tone
by George Stone, '2, de-
ne at the J-Hop. A sketch
e Talamon, of the French
by James House, '24L,
:he frontispiece of this is-
n at the Arms Confer-
article by Herbert Case,
an interview with Yasaka
., the son of Baron Kan-
mate account of the con-
its menbers i* presen$-
is contributed "The Black
' ssatirical discussion of
;erature. "From State
all Street," by Earl D.
resident of the American
hg company, often called
(ing,"js a human interest'
writer's experiences at
mdoJ* CInlts to Rehearse
hearsals tor the concert
ck tomorrow afternoon at
. the Matinee Musicale se-
i the JJUiversity Glee and
LIbs will appear, will be
and at 7 o'clock by the
npolin clubs, respectively.
OUTS WANTED~

MYRA B. JORAN, DEAN OF WOM-
EN, WHOSE RESIGNATION HAS
BEEN ACCEPTED BY THE BOARD
OF REGENTS, AFTER 20 YEARS'
SERVICE.
"BEST" IS SUBJECT
OF KNG LCTURE
President of Oberlin College Says One
' Must Serve Well to Receive
Most from Life
SPEAKER IS WELL KNOWN AS
AUTHOR OF SEVERAL BOOKS
"To reach the greatest happiness,
the greatest personal influence, and to
develop the greatest character, one
must seek to serve through his activ-
ity and the example of his personal
character, must consider his natural
abilities, and costantly remain in the
company of the best,", said Henry .
King, president of Oberlin college and
anthor of several books, in his ad-
dress on "The Best" Sunday evening
at Hill auditorium given under the
auspices o the University services
committee.-
Mr. King showed that one was at his
best when he excelled in these three
qualities, character, personal influ-
ence, and happiness. He showed that
happiness was only the result of pos-
sessing great character and personal
influence for the right; that it rested
on these two qualities. To remain in
the company of the best, to give the
most of service based upon a consid-
eration of one's natural abilities in
the way of personal influence and ac-
aivity is the true philosophy of life, he
said.
HITCHCOCK, ',2, ENGAGED
TO 17I15 WILEY OF DETROIT
Graduation Forces Resignation from
Presidency of S. C. A. and
Daily Staff
Announcement has been made of the
engagement of Charlotte M. Wiley of
Detroit to Hugh W. Hitchcock, '22,
former assistant managing editor of
The Daily and president of the Stu-
dent Christian association.
Hitchcock graduated at the end of
last semester. He is a member of the
Delta Kappa-Epsilon fraternity, Mich-
igamua, Sphinx, Griffins, Pi Delta Ep-
silon, and Sigma. Delta Chi.
Joseph A. Bernstein, '22, has been
appointed news editor of The Daily to
succeed Hitchcock, and Philip P. El-
lott, '22, has been appointed president
of the Student Christian association.
IUNION TO RESU31E WEEKLY
DINNER DANCES ON FRIDAY
Union members will again be en-
tertained at a we'kkly dinner dance
Friday evening in the Union dining
hall, the regular program of the eve-
ning to be provided by the dance com-
mittee. This dance is the continua-
tion of a series of weekly dinner dae-
es which have, been planned by the
Union but which were discontinued
during the examination period. Reser-
vations for tables should be made
with Dennis Donovan, house manager
of the Union, before Thursday, if ac-
commodations are desired. r
The regular dinner will be served
from 6 to 8 o'clock in the dining room
with no extra charge for covers. A
combination selected from the regalr
union orchestra~will provide music for
dancing.
BUSINESS RUSH CAUSES NEW N
BOOK EXCANGE LOCATION
Due to the constant use of the book
exchange service at the Union, the
committee will make its headquarters
In the lobby of the Union from 4 to 5: O
o'clock every afternoon of this week.
Books are on file both for buyers

and for sellers,~and a large number of
exchanges have already been made.
No books are to be brought to the Un-
ion. All that is, necessary for their
classification is the name of the au-
thors, the titles, the prices desired and
and the name, address, and telephone
numbers of the student desiring to buy
or sell the books.

HOCKEY TEAM WINS
FROM WISCONSIN
(Special to The Daily)
Madison, Wis., Feb. 13.-Michigan's
hockey team defeated Wisconsin here
today by afinal score of 6 to 3. Bark-
ell and Kcahn starred for Michigan,
Barkell scoring four goals. Kerr and
Steketee each added one goad to Mich-
igan's count making the score 6 to 3 in
favor df the Maize and Blue.
The ice was in very bad condition
for hockey and consequently slowed
the game considerably. Even with this
disadvantage, however, Michigan's
team play showed up vastly superior
to that of Wisconsin.
fAMOUS'NEWSPAPER MN
WILL ADDESS STUDENTS
JUNIUS B. WOOD, '00, RENOWNED
WAR CORRESPONDENT, WILL
GIVE TWO TALKS
Junius B. Wood, '00, one of the fore-
most of newspaper writers and war
correspondents in the country, will be
in Ann Arbor on Friday of this week
and will deliver two addresses before
students and others interested in
newspaper work and reporting. The
first address will be given in Unive-
sity Hall before journalism classes
and the second will be before a lunch-
eon of the Students' Press club at
noon. at the Union.
Mr. Wood has been almost contin-
uously in newspaper work since his
graduation In 1900. For the past two
years he ha been in the Far East,
in Japan, the Philippines, China, the
South Seas, and Siberia. Previously
he was accredited correspondent with
the American Expeditionary forces in
France, with the two Mexican expedi-
tions, the Cuban uprising, and what he
calls "other real and near scraps" in
different parts of the world.
He was called back from Japan last
fall to help cover the Washington
conference, and is now delivering a
series of lectures before different uni-
versities, throughout the country.
HARRY FRANOK, AUTHOR
AND TRAIELE, TO SPEAK
PEOPLES AND COUNTRIES WILL
BE PRINCIPAL SUBJECTS
OF DISCUSSION
Harry A. Franck, prominent author
and traveler, will be the speaker at
the Oratorical association lecture
course number at 8 o'clock Thursday
night in Hill auditorium. The lecture
will be on different countries and peo-
ples whom he has visited in his world
wanderings.
. Made Journeys on Foot
Mr. Franck's world travels are con-
sidered to be of great interest in that
he has covered the continents on
foot. Starting in Spain, he journeyed
to South America, where four years
were spent among the people of that
continent, including Central America
and Mexico. At the outbreak of the
war, Mr. Franck saw service in
France and Italy as a commissioned
officer. After the armistice, he made
a vagabond trip through Germany,
where he became familiar with the
conditions of that country. Leaving
Germany, a trip was made through the
West Indies, where the true situation
in regard to American interests was
brought to light. Although none of
the journeys were made for the prim-
ary purpose of adventure, Mr. Franck
visited parts of the world where white
men are seldom seen.
Has Wide Experiences
A large part of his experiences were
with extraordinary people. In Cairo,

Mr. Franck fell in with professional
beggars; in Haiti, he traveled into the
bandit-infested country; in Buenos
Aires, he lived in the slums. He was
always interested in people as his
travels will sbow.
WILSON FUND CONTRI UTIONS
COMING IN SATISFACTORILY'
Contributions to the Wilson Foun-
dation fund have been coming in very
satisfactorily, according to Dean Al-
fred H. Lloyd of the Graduate School
who Is in charge of the fund here.
More than 35 contributions have been
,received, to date, with total cash
amounting to $200. The majority of
these subscriptions have been made
by members of the faculty, part of
them, however, donated by townspeo-
ple.
"Although no campaign has been
made for the fund among the stu-
dents, any amount that they may wish
to subscribe for the Wilson Founda-
tion will be gladly accepted," stated
Dean Lloyd.

Ohio,

MICHIGAN Lo
'TO IND1IAA1
D[FEA9TS 0s
MILER SCORES ALL 'P
MATHER'S MEN IN
GAME
WOLVERINES BR]
EVEN ON THl

Bloomington, Ind., Feb. 13
score of 15 to 14, the Indiana
vanced closer to the Conferen
etball championship by defeati:
igan in the hardest foughtgai
ed here this season. Miller,
forward, was not only the
star, but the star of the entir
as he made every point that w
ited to the Maize and Blue team
The defeat at the hands of
makes Michigan break even
trip, as Mather's men rompe
with Ohio State at Columbus S
night by a score of 38 to~1
score at the end of the first ha
was 17 to 9. Ely was the outs
star of the game there, getti'
field goals. , Greenspun was 1
scorer for Ohio State.
The summery of the Ohio Sta

was:
Field goals, Ely 8, Kipke
4, Dudley 2, Young 1. Fre
Miller 6 in 10, Greenspun 7 i
sonal fouls, Ely 2, Miller 1
Greenspun 2, Dudley 1, Ro
Pence 1, Young 1. Techn
Miller 2, Kipke 3, Ely 1, R
pon 1, Greenspun 2, Young
tutions, Birks for Kipke,
Pence, Pence for Davis.

,

. _

Eaton, '2A Reiew s tichigan Ways
In Casi 4mrSet" Article,

State Easily Beaten Sai
Score of 38-17; Ely Si
For Maize and Blue
(Special to The Daily

Publipations, the campus, the fap-
ulty, and last but not least, the' gen-
eral spirit qf the tudent body at
Michigan are all'-discussed by G. D.
Eaton, '23, in an article published in
the Mach issue of the "Smart Set"
which will be on sale in the book
stores Thursday. The article is one
of a series on higher learning in
America, a single campus being dis-
cussed in each issue by an alumnus
or student.
Diferent Than Old Days
After a consideration of most of
the important aspects of life on the
campus, Eaton concludes that it has
come to be a direct antithesis Pt what
it was described to be in the Chicago
"Graphic" of April .4, 1891, which.
says, "Life atthe University of Mich
igan is characterized by a freedom and
simplicity such as few colleges can
offer. There are no dormitories, ,11
prizes, no markings in the class rooms,
no attempt to regulate habits pr asso-
ciations. The student is treated as a
citizen and is left to manage his own
affairs to suit himself. Ile is ac-
countable to the University only for
his studies." It is the loss 'of inde-
pendence, of free acting an-d thinking
that is lamented in the article.,
Rigid faculty control cf The Daily
is blamed for its wea editorials and
grandmotherly censorig of news. The
Chimes, according to the article, "pub-
lishes the worst storie ever written"
and "contains stuffy a ticles by stuf-
fy alumni." Whimsies, the Gargoyle,
and the \ichiganensia are also dis-
cussed.
Considering the b ldinga on the
campus Eaton speaks Martha Cook

in, except for the hideous way in
which its two big rooms on the first
floor are begawded." The Michigan
Union he brands as "hotel-like," and
the new Library is "factory-like" al-
though the front with its spread of
steps and portal, is commended.
Disapproves Most SoCletles
The great number of clubs, organi-
zations, and fraternities, he condemns.
Of fraternities he speaks favorably as
generally "peopled with the brainiest,
most agreeabie, most convivial stu-
dents on the eampus," but for "socie-
ties ad infinitum, and apparently with-
out purpose" he has no patience.
'Of the women students he says, "If
there remains anything eaceptional
about the Univerity of Michigan stu-
dent body, it is to be found among
the women. Never have I found so
many women who tall intelligently
about thijigs that would' curdle" the
bloo4 of a Sunday school principal.
Lack of freedom for the women is at-
tributed to the fact that this is a state
university.and the tax-payers insist on
rigid discipline for their daughters.
SEMESTER GRADES TO BE
MAILED LATE 'HI WEEK
Reports tof' the semester's work
will be sent out the latter part of this
week, it was announced yesterday by
Registrar Arthur G. Hall. Owing to
the fact that several reports have but
recently come into the o lee, the
grades have not all been checked
over.
Corrections in classifications will
probably be made, for this reason, on
Monday and Tuesday of next week.

All tryouts for the editorial staff w'
meet at 3 o'clock this afternoon.
Sophomores wishing to try out f
the xsport staff should report betwee
2 and 5 o'clock today at the sport des
Fraternities are requested to sett
their accounts for the J-Hop extt
which were delivered to their hous
Feb. 11.
With a sale of more than 3000 copie
the extra for the 1923 J-Hop brok
all previous records for J-Hop e
tras. At 1 o'clock in the morning 1,5
copies were distributed to the gues
at the gymnasium. This first ed
tion contained a review of the dan
and guest lists. The morning editic
which was 0istributed at 8 o'clock co
tained the picture of the dancers,
addition to the news of the first editic
The picture which was taken
10:45 o'clock was rushed to Detro
and an engraving made. At 4:
o'clock the completed engraving w
locked in the forms and the extra d
livered to readers at 8 o'clock.
This year's edition of the J-Hop e
tra proved to have the biggest dema:
of any that have been hitherto- pu
lished. More than 1,000 orders we
refused.
Following custom, The Daily w
print a directory supplement whic
will contain the names of men ente
ing school this semester and the ne
addresses of those who have chang
their location.
In an attempt to get the informati
at an early date in order to print t
lists as soon as possible, those w
have. additions or corrections are r
quested to send them in before Fe
28. Names and addresses should
typewritten to avoid errors.
CLIP THIS COUPON
Name...... ..........
Class ..............
Address. ............
Phone.............

s wishing to try-
il assistants on
ase repqrt at the
hird floor of the
4 and 6 o'clock
is week.
Business
ahing to try out
Sstaffof Chimes
2 and a o'clock
row afternoop in

Home.............
If a correction please n
address or mistake to
rected...............
Mail the coupon to di
editor, The Michigan Daily
building, before Feb. 28.

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