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October 06, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-06

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, 'HURSDAY, OCTOBER 6 1921

PRICE

U NT
1155 AS
, MORE UPPER.
ER VARIOUS
(DES
)UCATION
[iON IS 14 4

veering and, Literary Collees
Show Decrease; Medical
School Larger .
rollment figures given out from
registrar's office Wednesday re-
the fact that there are fewer stu-
Senrolled in the Literary and En-
ring collegs this year than at the
time last year but that other
iols, particularly Medicine and
Summer Session, have, gone over
year's figures. Further it is es-
.ed that additional enrollments in
epartments during the year will
Lit to five per cent of the pres-
fgure, bringing the entire total
11,155. These computations are
3 on careful study and past ex-
nce in the registrar's office.
Fewer Freshmen
ile there has been a noticeable'
ig off in the enrollment of fresh-
for the various colleges, this fact
'set by the large numbers of first
women, upperclassmen, and
.iate students. Added to this
>er it is estimated that about 50
:ent of the.Summer Session reg-
tion duplicates enrollments for'
ollowing semester. Since the to-
attendance at the last Summer
on was 2,815, one-half of, that
>er is deducted to cover those now
1. There are a total of 144 reg-
ed in the Shiool of Education,
Prof. W. G. Henderson, director of
University Extension division,
500 as a very conservative esti-
of the number enrolled in that
rtment. However, since classes
te Extension division do not be-
until the week of Oct. 10, there
o basis for a definite statement
tis time., The enrollment in the
al colleg this year lacks 59 ofj
ping the mark of 455 attained lastl
but of the 396 .enrolled, 8 are
al hygienists.
Official Estimate
Full yre Oct. 5.
1920-21 1921;
Ature, Science, and

Prof. R. . Wenley, After 25 Years
Service, Gives Vie vsOf Old Campus

(By D. 0. B.)
"Forsan et haec olim meminisse
luvabit," sang Publius Vergilius
Maro, of blessed memory,.and with a
keen appreciation of human nature,
for not only was the famous remark
true in the case of the "pius Aeneas",
but also in the case of Prof. Robert
M. Wenley, of the philosophy depart-
ment, who after 25 years at Michigan
harks back to the old days, when the
University was a robust young man
of 60.
"At that time," says Professor Wen-
ley, "University hall had been decapi-
tated and had no dome The law
building, engineering building, medi-
cal building, chemistry building, nat.
ural science building, and the libra-
ry, dental building, and heating plant
did not exist The rooms now occu-
pied by Secretary Smith formed ,one
large, hideous hole where the lions of
the lit faculty howled. This fierce
place was decorated by several huge
statues - they must have been 14
feet high, and they struck awe into
the heart of the newcomer as he arose
to take the floor. Where the natural
science building now stands there
were several shacks, survivals of the
Civil War period. A small stand at
the faar end of what iS now Ferry
field, seating about 700, sufficed'for
a 'stadium'."
Professor Wenley recollects the

day when, while most of Michigan's
present student body were not yet in
a position to know what a train was,
a "steam bumper", of unhappy mem-
ory, perambulated between Ann Ar-
bor and Ypsilanti. Says Professor
Wenley, "I can still recollect that
the carpet which decorated its long
side seats was a triumph of high-art
patterning - it must have been cop-
ied from, the, one which is to be seen
in the. picture of the surrender of Lee
which is on exhibition in Alumni Me-
morial hall!
"For the rest," said the professor,
"there seems to have been much less
rush and much more learned leisure
than we have now. At least I was
not caught up in end less committees1
and similar time-destroying devices.
The students were educationally a far
more homogeneous body. All had a
good grounding in the classics and
mathematics. One could even write
Greek on the balckboard, sure that
most could read it. Activities were
far fewer. Above all, we were not
bothered on every hand by sudden
appearance of that anaemic bogy,
'preparation for life'. But after all is
said and done, what moves me most
is .the vacant places among my old
colleagues, and the vacant places in
the pleasant homes where I was first
received as a friend, even though a
stranger from a far country."

UPPERCLISS ADVISORY
LISTS MILD TODAY
CHAIRMAN URGES THAT ADVISERS
COMMUNICATE IMMEDIATE-
LY WITH FRESHMEN
Changing the original plans to send
each upperclass adviser the names of
four freshmen, the wmmittee when
completing the work of making out
the lists for each adviser yesterday,
cut the number to three and completed
the work so that all names will be in
the hands of the advisers by this aft-
ernoon. The change was made possi-
ble by the enthusiastic response to
the request for more advisers.
Following receipt of the names of
their charges, the upperclass advisers
are urged to get into immediate touch
with them, by W. W. Gower, '22, chair-
man of the committee. "Now is the
formativetperiod of the University life
of the freshmen," he said, "and if we
can reach them, put them into the
proper relation with their work and
their associates, and get them into act
tivities to which they are eligible, we
will have taken a longbstep toward
the attaining of the best spirit at
Michigan. Delay by the advisers in
reaching their men will ruin the pur-
pose of the work."-1,
Plans for the group meetings of
the freshmen, whic will be held later,
with prominent men on the campus.t
as speakers, are maturing rapidly,
Gower stated, and speakers will be
announced within a few days. Either I
three or four sections will be divided
off for the meetings, according to thet
size of the rooms which can be ob-
tained.
NATIONS EDUCATE THiR
HIGHWAY BUILDERS HERE
i j
FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS SEND
MEN TO MICHIGAN FOR TECH-.
NICAL TRAINING
Governments interested In road
building are sending men to Michigan
for training' in the profession, accord-
ing to information given out by Prof.
Arthur H. Blanchard, of the highway
engineering and highway transport
department.
Chao Tsang Gee, Shih Yu Cheng, and
S. Y. Tang have been sent by the gov-
ernment of China, and Carlos M. Rold-
an by Bolivian authorities. Indications
are that an English engineer from In-
dia and one from New Zealand will ar-I
rive shortly. Franz Thorfinn, a grad-
uate of Chalmers Technical institute
of Sweden, is enrolled here as a fel-
low In the American-Scandanavian
foundation, a position which carries
with it the choice of any American un-
iversity. The list of foreign delegates
may be even greater after the short
courses begin in December.
Applications for fellowships, to be
awarded by the Board of Regents in
November, have come to Professor
Blanchard from graduates of West
Point, Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology, the University of Maine, Ohio
State, Illinois, and the Pekin National
university.3
0HW A TICKETS DEMOAED
BY HALF STUDENT BODY
OCT. 12 FINAL DATE FOR APPLI.

CATIONS TO RECEIVE
PRECE16ENCE
Approximately one-half of the stu-
dents on the campus have filed appli-
cations for tickets to the Ohio State
game, Oct. 22, according to the files in
the athletic office.
Officials in charge of the distribu-
tion call attention to the fact that
Wednesday, Oct. 12, will be the last
day on which classes will be given
precedence, and after that date all
applications received will be filed in
the order in which they are received..
At the present time these requests are
being filed according to class, seniors
and juniors being given privilege
over underclassmen. After Oct. 12
the orders for seats will be placed in
the files, irrespective of campus sen-
iority.
Applications from both students and
alumni are being received daily, and
within a short time after Oct. 12 the
assignments will be made.

ROOMS NOTICE
More than 1,000 rooms are
needed by the Union rooming
bureau for the housing of alumni
during their visit to the Ohio
State game. Landladies are urg-
ed to list all available rooms
with Philip J. Schneider, chair-
man of the rooming committee
for the Ohio State game. He can
! be reached , either by mail or
phone at the Union.
CLASS ROOMs SHORTAGE
ISCUSSED By DEAS,
DECIDE THAT USE OF HILL AUDI-
TORIUM SHOULD BE
AVOIDED
Inadequate class room facilities was
the main topic under discussion at thet
dean's conference held yesterday
morning. Class rooms in the varioust
buildings are filled to overflowing, and
the problem of how to bring into use,
all available space is one that demands
considerable attention.t
Attention was called to the fact that
several classes are being held in Hillf
auditorium, notably the courses in Eco--
nomics 1 and Political Science 1, andI
the consensus of opinion at the meet-a
ing was that such use of the auditor-
ium should be avoided if at all possi-
ble. This building is intended primar-
ily for the presentation of public meet-
ingsin connection with the University,
and it was thought that its use for
classes would not only violate that
rule, but would be detrimental to the
interior decoration and equipment.
Frank E. Robbins, assistant to the
President, is to conduct a survey of
the available class room space in thet
literary college, in an effort to relieve ;
the congestion, and allow intervals be-
tween classes occasionally for neces-
sary ventilation. '
UNION RENEWS REQUST
FOR VANT ROOM LIST
APPLICATIONS FOR 0. S. U. AND3
MINNESOTA ACCO1WMODA.
TIONS POUR IN
Ever increasing difficulties by the
Union in handling applicaions for ac-
commodations over the week-ends of1
the Ohio State and Minnesota foot-
ball games on Oct. 22 and Nov. 19,
caused a further appeal by the Union
yesterday to all who have vacant
rooms suitable for the use' of Michi-
gan alumni or families of students.,
The fact that the convention of the
Press club, .bringing visitors fromI
throughout the state, will be held at
the time of the Ohio game furtheri
complicates the problem of handling
the many hundreds who will be in
Ann Arbor over that date Requestsi
for rooms are being received at the1
Union daily, despite the fact that all -
available' space is already reservedi
for life members and other alufnni.1
C mmittee Appointed
A special committee was appointed
by R. E. Swart, '22E, president of
the Union, this week to collect data
on vacant rooms in town. The chair-
man, Phil Snyder, '23E, should be
addressed in care of the Alumni

Housing committee by anyone who
could 'accommodate visitors for the
week-end of either game. His assist-
ants are William Alexander, '24,
Thomas Rice, '23, and Charles Chap-
-ple, '24.
Will File Information
Many 'families of students are ex-
pected in Ann Arbor to see the games
and unless co-operation in listing
room-space is received from towns-
people, the committee is expecting
still more serious difficulties. The in-
formation as received will be placed
on file in the Union lobby for the use
of students.

CARL MAYS HOLDS McGRAWITES
TO FIvE HITS; NEVER IN
DANGER
MIKE MCNALLY STARS
BY CLEAN STEAL HOME
Ruth's Best is Siugle Scoring Frst
Run; Frisch Stars for
Giants
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 5. - Carl Mays,
with one. of his masterful exhibitions
of box work, pitched the Yankees to
a well earned victory over the Giants
in the first game of the 1921 World
Series at the Polo grounds today. The
blond American league twirler of the
underhand delivery held the Natioial
leaguers runless, the final score be-
ing: New York American, 3, New
York National, 0.
Nays Well Supported
It was not without some fine field-
ing behind Mays, some pretty work
with the stick and clever running on
the bases that the Yankess were able
to get the jump in the first All-New
York series for world baseball hon-
ors. Babe Ruth, king of the. long dis-
tance clouters, although he didn't
make any home runs, was in fair with
a timely hit and .some inspiring and
heady coaching on the lines. Mike Mc-
Nally, the Yankees' third baseman,
rated as one of their weakest hitters,
contributed a double which blossomed
into a run and jumped into a niche
in theWorld Series hall of fame by
carrying off a neat steal of home in
the fifth inning for the second ru, of
the game
Frisch Stars
The Yankee victory was won against
a determined Giant defense, the stirl-
ing feature of which was a - well
pitched game by Phil Douglas, the Na-
tional spit ball star. Douglas had the
slugging Ruth at his mercy after the
fourth inning, striking Babe out twice
amid roars of approval from the
Giant rooters. In the Giant line-up
Frank Frisch, stellar third baseman,
ran true to his spectacular form, get-
ting four of the Nationals' five hits,
one of them a triple and handling
brilliantly everything that came his
way.
Ruth Drives in Score
The Yankees' three runs came in the
first, fifth and sixth innings. Miller
opened the game with a single to cen-
ter and took second-on. Pecknpaughns
sacrifice, Douglas to Kelly. Miller scor-
ed when Ruth hit the first ball pitch-
ed to him to center field. It was a
hot drive and brought great cheering
from the big crowd.
McNally Steals Home
In the fifth McNally opened with the
only double of the game, was advanced
to third on Schang's sacrifice, Douglas
to Kelly and stole home.
The third run came in the sixth,
Peckinpaugh singled to short. A
passed ball by Schnieder allowed him
to gain' second. After Ruth struck
out Meusel hit to left center, scoring
Peckinpaugh, Meusel drew up on
third for what looked like a perfect
three bagger and was called out for
not touching first base. After this
inning only one Yankee reached third
base.
3,68 9Apply For
Ilnionfrembersip

After receiving 46, applications for
membership to the Michigan Union
during the afternoon, the registration
committee closed its office last night
with atotal of 3,689 members officially
enrolled. This number, considerably
less than the figures reached last
year at this time, represent all the
cards of membership that have been
given out since the, opening of the
fall term.
The office of the committee in the
lobby of the Union will be kept open
from 3 to 5 o'clock today and tomor-
row. Applications must be received
by 5 o'clock Friday if students are to
obtain their annual membershin cards.

YANKS." CONQUER 61ANTS, 3-0 BY
SHARP HiTIGAND CLEVER WOR
ON' BASES IN WOLID SERIES OPE

Health Nursing..
on courses.....
ring and Archi-
e
school. ....
Training' school..
hool .............
cy ...............
pathic Medical

4879
4
693
2213
450
147
862
101

4565
4
500
1932
557
179
374
77

DR. REUBEN PETERSON HEADS STATE
.DIVISION OF NATIONAL CANCER FIGHTI

S...............52 62
Training school.. 35 42
college .......... 455 396
te school ........1440; 377
r Session........2194 2815
of Education...... 144
---- -~

with deduction
plications ..16623

10624

year 1921-1922...:.....11155
UNION OK
LI BE CHOSEN TONIGHT
1 decision on the book which
e used for the 1922 Michigan
opera will be made at 5 o'clock
'ternoon, when the book com-
meets at the Union. The selec-
ill be made from one of the five.
which have been submitted sinces
sing of school last semester.
al opportunity' for all men who
:o appear as tryouts for cast
ns in the opera will be given at
Jal rehearsal at 7 o'clock Fri-
ct. 7, in Mimes Campus theater.
apportunity is given primarily
ose men who were unable to
out last spring. At that time
:imately 500 men turned out and
200 have appeared as tryouts
From this number a list of
e men, best suited for cast parts
e chosen. Singers and dancers
e in greatest demand this year

Simple facts concerning the men-
ace of cancer will be presented to the
people of Michigan during the week
of Oct. 30-Nov. 5, in order to bring to
them a realization of the nature of the
disease. Such is the purpose of the
nation-wide Cancer Week campaign
as explained by'Dr. Reuben Peterson,
of the Medical school, who is state
chairman, in an interview yesterday
afternoon.
Sills 90,000 Yearly
"The information which we wish to
get to the general public is this: 90,-
000 people die of cancer in the United
States every year. Cancer starts as
a local disease. If treated early
enough, while it is still local, it can
be cured. We intend to go into detail
about a few symptoms. We are cir-
culating thousands of pamphlets on
the subject, more than 400 newspa-
pers are helping us, 500 movie hous-
es are to show slides both prior to
and during Cancer Week, and," con-
cluded Dr. Peterson, "after all this
work, we sincerely hope that we
shall have brought home to the public
the nature of the dread disease and
BUSINESS TRYOUTS
Tryouts for the busiIess side
of The Michigan Daily may apply
between 2 and 4 o'clock any aft-
ernoon this week. First semester
freshmen are not eligible.

the absolute necessity for seeking ad-
vice early, before the disease reaches
a fatal point."
State Subdivided
Dr. Peterson has, for the purpose of
organizing his work, divided the state
into 13 districts corresponding to the
13 congressional districts. Each dis-
trict is to have its district chairman,
who in turn appoints sub-chairmen
and sub-committees in each county.
In Washtenaw county the local chair-
man is Dr. J. A. Wessinger, local
health officer. Dr. A. S. Warthin,. of
the University, has chrge of the lec-
ture bureau for the county, and is to
arrange for four or five public tec-
tures to be given in the city and
county.
Solicit Wonen's Help
Besides these district divisions,
there is td be a central state commit-
tee, to which in addition to the district
chairmen have been appointed repre-
sentatives from various women's
clubs and organizations whose duty it
is to help get the facts before the
women of the state,
Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, and Wis-
consin compose one of the regions in-
to which the entire country has been
divided. The chairman for this re-
gion is Dr. Fred T. Murphy, of De-
troit. The plan as a whole originated
in the American Society for the Con-
trol of Cancer, which has been in ex-
istenhce since 1903, and the announced
intention of the campaign is not to'
scare the people, but rather to pro-
mulgate a knowledge of the nature of
cancer.

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