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January 28, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-28

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DAY AND
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... ...........

ANN ARBOR ilCHIGAN. SATURDAY, JANUARY 28, 1922

PltIcu

,.

MOLD
IENCE

WILL

TuRN MANY AWAY
AT DINNER DANCE
Numbers of Union members were
turned away from the dining hall at
the second dinner dance given- by the
Union from 6 to 8 o'clock last night.
All tables were filled a short time aft-
er the doors were opened and further
applicants could not be accommo-
dated.
Special music, as at the first dance,
was provided by a combination of
musicians from the Union orchestra.
A s ngle large table was provided for
the chaperones and a space cleared
in the center for dancing by the re-
moval of a number of other tables.
BUILDING PROGRA M
IS1BEING RUSHED
Construc!lon Work Progresses Despite
Enforced Slowing Down Because
of Cold

tFARE ARE
MEETING:

After Wash-
s Are

(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 27.-A resolution
providing for another conference be-
tween representatives of the five pow-
ers to consider rules of warfare, was
agreed on today by the permanent
committee of the arms conference.
The resolution provides that the Un-
ited States, Great Britain, Japan,
France and Italy each shall appoint
two representatives and that the 10
shall sit as an international commis-
sion, beginning their sessions soon aft-
er the Washington negotiations end.
The names of, the delegates are re-
quired to be submitted to the American
government.within three months after
the Washington conference adjourns,
after which this government will fix.
a time of meeting. The resolution pro-
vides that the conclusion shall be com-
municated to the various powers,. who
are then to confer as to a method to
secure -world wide adherence to the
new warfare regulations.
Thecommisson of 10 is charged
with determining first whether exist-
ing international law 'covers new
agencies of war which have developed
since the Hague convention' of 1907,
and second, what changes should be'
made in order to bring the regulations.

PHYSICS BUILDING CONTRACT
TO BE LET N NEAR FUTURE
Work on Michigan's new building
program is progressing at a rapid
rate, although the cold weather of the
past 10 days has caused some delay.
Cement has been poured for the
foundation to the Clements library,
and the side walls are being built.
The recent period of cold weather has
necessitated a slight slowing down on
she work, but wish the return o, mod-
crate weather, the work will once
more be rushed forward.
The Ann Arbor Asphalt Construc-
tion company is tearing down and re-
moving tue houses on East University
and Washtenaw avenues across the
street from the campus. Two of these
houses have now been removed and
the remainder will Le tora down as
soon as possible in order that ground
may be oroken on this site. The site
will be given over to a new Medical
building and to engineering shops.
It was found necessary to excavate
to the depth of 22 feet in preparation
for the Dental addition. The upper
layer of earth was entirely unfit for
build.ng purposes. For a time it was
unceriain whether or not an addition
could be constructed at this point. A
perfect stratum of hard gravel was
uncovered, however, at a depth of 22
feet, and work is now progressing
rap.d.y, cement having ben poured
last week.
Borings made for the new Physics
building have been found entirely sat-
isfactory. - Bids are being received by
the University and. the contract will
be let at an early date. The new build-
ing is to be situated on the lot now
occupied by the R. 0. T. C. building.
BEUT R UGLINESS

SLLINIS STARS
FOUNDINELIGSIBLE
Disqualified for Playing Post-Season
Semi-Professional Football
Game
THREE HAD GAINED PLACES
ON ALL-WESTERN GRID TEAMS
(By Associated Press) _ _
Urbana, Ill., Jan. 27.-Nine star ath-
letes at the University of Illinois were
declared ineligible for further compe-
tition because they played in a semi-
professional football game after the,
close of the Western Conference seas
on. .
The nine men are Larry Walquist,
Jack Crangle, "Crow" Sternaman,
"Dutch" Kaiser, "Dope" Simpson, John
Peuscher, D. A. Milligan, F. J. Gam-
mage and P. P. Green.
Crangle, Walquist, and Sternamaui
were stars on the football team and
all three were selected by some writ-
ers for-the mythical All-Western team.
Walquist was also looked on as the
best basketball player in the univer-
sity and his loss has materially less-
ened the Illini's chances for the cham-
pionship this year. Crangle, besides
playing fullback for four years, in-
cluding an R. O. T. C. year, was among
the leading baseball players is the
Middle West. Green also was a regu-
lar on the football eleven while the
rest were substituted.
The game which resulted in the dis-
quallfication was played at Taylor-
Ville. Ill., Nov. 27, 1921. The oppos-
ing team incuded several Notre Dame
players in its line-up. The team on
which the Illinois men played won by
a. 9 to 0 score. Sternaman kicked
three fiald goals.
The fact that a number of college
payers took part in the contest soon
became rather generally known and
resulted in. reports that Illinois had
defeated Notre Dame in a post-seas-
on game.
Whether the men received any mon-
ey for playing has not been made
known the disqualification being ord-
ered tinder a Western Conference rule
which says that no college player may
take part In any outside athletic con-.
test while on his college team.
FRESHMAN ARCHITECTS PLAN
DANCE FOR DAY AFTER J-HOP

SIX HUNDRED SEEK
MIDYEAR E1NTRANCE
Between 600 and 700 persons have
applied for admission to the Univer-
sity for the second semester,.it was
announced yesterday by Registrar Ar-
-thur G. Hall. This number is an in-
crease of approximately 100 over the
enrollment for the second semester
of last year.
Up to date only 15 have signified
an intention of transferring from one
school to another for the next se-
mester. It is thought that a consider-
able number have neglected to apply,
for transcripts. Such applications
should be made within the next two-
or three days, states Registrar Hall,
if the students expect to be enrolled
for work in their departments at the
beginning of the semester.
Faculty Jiembers
To Give Twilight
P.rogram Sunday

Three members of the School of Mus-
ic faculty will give the next Twilight
recital at 4:15 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in Hill auditorium. The artists
are, in the order of their appearance,
Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, pianist, An-
thony J. Whitmire, violinist, and Mrs.
Willam Wheeler, soprano.
Their program is as follows:
-Thirty-two Viariations......beethoven
Maud Okkelberg.
Aubade Provencale..Couperin-Kreisler
Gavotte............Gossec-Burmester
Menuett .............Back-Burmester
Serenade Espagnole.............r...
................Chaminade-Kreisler
Valse-Bluette ...........Dirgo-Auer
Anthony J. Whitmire
Les Silhouettes..........Carpenter
The Street Organ ..........Sibella
Twickenham Ferry ...........Molloy
The Winds in the South.......Scott
S Mrs. William Wheeler
Spinning Song........Wagner-Liszt
The Linden Tree.......Schubert-Liszt
Nachtfalter Valse Caprice.......
................ Strauss-Tausig
Mrs. Okkelberg
Adagio, Op. 34 ............ ...Ries
Ungarisher, Op. 29............Hauser
Mr. Whitmire
TODAY LAST DAY TO TAKE
MICHIGANENSIAN PICTURES
Today is the last day that pictures
may be taken for the 1922 Michiganen-
sian, according to James G. Frey,
managing editor. There will be ab-
solutely no extension of time. More
'pictures have been taken for the
Michiganensian this year than ever
before and every page has been sold.
Spy Captured in New York
New York, Jan. 27.-Ignatius T.
Lincoln, international spy, was taken
into custody today.

NAME PRESTON M. HICK
PROFESSOR OF ROENT4
OLOGY
AUTHORIZE PART TI
STUDY WITH $2
Approve Exchange Between P
Pollocl of Botany Departi
and Hawai Man
Detailed plans for the co
tion of the Homoeopathic
school with the medical colle
submitted and adopted at the
of the Board of Regents ye
providing a definite working b
the amalgamation of the two
and hospitals June 30, 1922.
The committee which ha
working on the plans since
meeting of the Regents subt
majority and a minority rep
majority report being adopte
detai'ed plan makes complete
sion for the students now
Homoeopathic school as well
the nurses in the Homo
training school, and includ
points. They are as follows:
The consolidation of the tm
ical schools and hospitals w
effect June 30, 1922.
Two Chairs of Homoeopa
There will be established
Medical school two chairs c
oeopathy, one in materia med
one in therapeutics. The R
of the University and the dea
Medical school are requested
Regents to suggest candidate
these chairs.
The membersrofthe facu
staff of the present Homo(
school are to be notifiedregar
date of consolidation, at whi

REGENTS ACCEPT DETILIL PLANS
[O ,CNII TO fM0 SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS JU~

SIR PHILIP GIB3S, LONDON WAR
CORRESPONDENT, WHO SPEAKS
UPON "WHAT I SAW IN RUSSIA."
TONIGHT IN HILL AUDITORIUM.
SIR PHILIP GIBBS
TO SEKTONIGHT,
Englishman Will Tell of Conditions
as He Observed Them in
Eastern Europe
"WHAT I AW IN RUSSIA" 18
SUBJECT FOR RIS ADDRESS

YDLUTION BILL
gists Condemn Measure
Kentucky Legislature
Reighard, head of the
irtment, received a tele-
lay frdm- President Mc-
tucky university, stating
as 'been introduced in the
gislature forbidding, un-
penalty, the teaching of
the use of any books fav-
ionary doctrines 'in any
>rted, by the state. Pro-
hard was asked to tele-
his opinon on the mat-
sage to be used in oppo-

"What I Saw in Russia" is the sub-
iect of the lecture which Sir Philip
Gibbs. famous Engl'sh writer' whose
opinions on world events are awaited
by hosts of followers, will deliver at
8 o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium
under the direction of the University
Oratorical assgclation.
- President Marion L. Burton will in-
troduce Sir Philip, whose lecture will
he based bn observations gained from
his recent six months' tour of Russia,
where le saw famine and a decaying
civilization. He has come to believe
that disarmament of Europe can be
approached only by way of Russia
and that any other method will lead
to war.
Sir Philip early entered the jouir-
nalistic profe-sion and after serving
as lterry ditr o seera ot t

Freshman architects are planning a
dance for the afternon following the
J-Hop, Saturday, Feb. 11. The dance
will be held at the Union and will be
open' to the entire student body, af-
fording recreation for thoe not at-
tending house parties. Kenneth
Black, '25A, chairman of the commit-
tee, has secured the "All Star" seven
piece orchestra for the occasion.
Tickets may be purchased next week
-it Graham's and Wahr's bookstores.

as literary editor of several of

the'!

ich a bill," re-
ighard upon re-
n., "would make
ng-stock of the

en asked his opinion of the'pro-
bill, Prof. A. Franklin Shull, of
ology department, replied, "How
rth a legislature could conceive
he teaching of evolution is a
r upon which it shou d legislate
Fond comprehension."
). C. DAVIS WILL SPEAK
C CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Ozora Stearrns Davis, president
e Chicago Theological seminary,
speak Sunday at 'the Congrega-
phurch. His theme at the
ng service at 10:30 o'clock will
'he Opulent Life," at the Con-
tional Students' association at
ock he will sepak informally on
re Will It Count the Most?"

REJECT THE ONE AND WE CHOOSE '
'THE OTHER FOR OUR CAMPUS
BUILDIh GS, SAYS WRITER.
Editor, The Michigan Daily.
Your thoughful editorials .headed
"Our Utilitarian Campus" and "Pure
Air for 1950" are evidences of an in-
terest in. the building problems of the
University--an interest which ought
to be much more general than it is.
In your future discussions, however,
it is to be hoped that you will abandon
a very common and very modern sup-
erstition which crept into your first
editorial, concerning the art of archi-
tecture. That is a notion that our
buildings must sacrifice beauty to util-
ity.
In truth, there is no such need. 1No
choice between beauty and utility i
set before us.' As a matter of course
our buildings ought to be both. beau-
tiful and useful. If we sacrifice beau-
ty at all, we sacrifice it, to ugliness.
This is the real choice that is set be-
fore us: If we reject beauty, we
choose ugliness; and the offened years,
as they pass will not accept the ex-
cuse of a supposed necessity."
W.H.
Tap Rooms Offers Imnersonations
Robert W. Frost, assisted by 'Wil-
liam Kratz, '24E, will furnish a pro-
gram of impersonations for tonight's
tap room entertainment at the Union
commencing at 10:30 o'clock.

CO-OPERATTVR STOR E WOULD BE POOR.
BUSINESS PLAN, IS HALL'S BELIEF

"As a purely business project, I do
not believe that a co-operative store
at Michigan has f good chance to
succeed," said Registrar Arthur G.
Hall in an interview yesterday. "Un-
less such an enterprise were super-
vised by a competent and experienc-
ed manager and backed by sufficient.
capital to enable it to secure large
discounts it could not hope to com-
pete with large book stores who, with
their larger capitals, would secure
such discounts that they could un-
dersell the co-operative store, and in
a' short time put it out of business,"
he continued..
Experience at Illinois
Dr. Hall stated that he did not wish
to appear as either supporting or, op-
posing such a scheme but merely pre-
senting his experience in the matter.
From 1903 to 1905 he was a member
of the faculty of the University of
I'linois. Neither Urbana or Cham-
paign had regular book stores at that
time. In most cases the instructors
took orders from the students and sent
the orders direct to the book publish-
ers. Such a condition made prices,
high, and there was a demand for a
co-operative store.P
A store was established but be
cause of its lack of capital it could

not secure advantageous discounts,
from the wholesale stores. It event-!
ually passed into the hands of a stock
company. .
Get Better Discounts
"There are three bookstores in
Ann Arbor, all much larger than
those in many cities larger than Ann
Arbor, which secure better discounts
than any student operated co-opera-
tive store could hope to obtain, and
the students get the benefit of the i
discounts," said Dr. Hall. "Thes?
stores could very easily underse'l the
co-operative store for this reason and
those students who now clamor for
the store would probably be the first
to realize the fact and return to trade
at the private concerns.
"However, if the venture were
started with a competent manager
and sufficient capital to secure dis-
counts, its chances for success would
be much greater than otherwise."
LAST ISSUE SUNDAY
With the issue appearing Sun-_
I day, Jan. 29, The Daily will sus-
I pend publication until Feb. 14 on.
( account of the examinations. I

largest London papers. he turned to
writing novels, history, essays, and
dramas, among some of-his more not-
ed wr-tings are: "Now It Can . Be
Told." "More That Can Be Told," "The,
Street of Adventure," "Men and,
-Women of the French Revo'utiorn
"Facts and Ideas," and "Menders of
Nets."
Dtring the World War he served as
a corresnondent with the British arm-
ies in the field.
Prof. Arthur L. Cross. of the his-
tory department, will be host to the
En'lisl'man while he is in Ann Arbor
and will give a dinner in his honor
at the Union.
The Oratorical association annouve-
es that season tickets for the re-
maing four lectures, including Sir
Philip Gibbs. Irvin S. Cobb, Harry
Franck and the R'ght Honorable . F.
Pearce, of Australia, may be secured
at the box-offilce of Hill auditorium
tonight for $2.50 and $2.
Prof. Campbell to Address A. A. U. W.
Prof. 0. .J. Campbell, of the English
departnent, wilt-address the Ann Ar
bor branch of the American Associa-.
tion of University Women at their reg-
ular meeting at 3 o'clock today in
the .Assembly hall of the Union. Pro-
fessor Camnh ell will speak on "What
is Worth While in .the Drama."

the present chairs in that schoo
be discontinued. r
The students now in the Hom
athic school are to be informe
they may be transferred to the
cal school for the completion o
work for ja degree as Doctor of
cine in Homoeopathy without 1
time being entailed by the tran
Care for Homo'eopathic Pat]
The present Homoeopathic hi
will be consolidated wih the U
sity hospital and placed unde
direction of the superintendent
University hospital, with'the
standingethat two wards, one fc
and one for women, shall be
tamed, for homoeopathic p:
and that two free beds for citi2
Ann Arbor shall also be main
as heretofore.
The two nurses' training i
will be consolidated on the sam
The nurses now in training i
Homoeopathic school will be giv
option, of receiving their diplc
homoeopathy.
It is expected that the small
ing at the Homoeopathic hospita
used as a children's ward, w
employed to house the rapidly g
Health servige.
Approve Building PlaIs
At this meeting designs wer
mitted& and approved for the n
oineering laboratories, the p
laboratory, the model high scho
the new building for the I
college.
The Regents also authorizedt
largement of the storehouse and
building as a measure of econ
the new buildink plans.
Establishment of a system o
time study, by which for an'4
tuition fee of $25 qualified p
may enter the University for n
five hours' work a semester, w
thorized. This fee does not
extra allowances, such as M
Union membership, - Health
fees, etc. Approval was given
; which is now in process of fo
(Continued on Page Eigh

E TO CAMPUS AND RE-
LOUS ORGANIZATIONS
rder to improve the gener-
pearance of The Daily it
desirable to discontinue
e of page one for display
Ising. Accordingly, -,the
page ribbon, hitherto,'sold
campus and religious or-
tions, will be no longer
ble, beginning Feb. 14.
VERNON F. HILLERY,
Business Manager.

i

IllinoIs Basketball Player Hurt'
Urbana, Ill., Jan.' 27.-Walter Roett-
zer of St. Louis. Mo., a star basket-
ball player at the University of Illi-
nois, suffered a broken arm in a
scrimmage tonight.

'I
II

"WHAT'S GOING ON" N07
All notices for the "'
Going On" column for the ci
two weeks must be in The
office by 7 o'clock this eveni

ATORVICAL ASSOCIATION

LECTVRE COUR

Tonight

SIR PreLuP GIBBS
ON
eeWHA I I SAW IN, RUSSIA"

Tonight

ff

ONE DOLLAR

.LO UT 0'C

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