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January 26, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-26

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AND WARMER
OW FLURRIES

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jDAY ANDDTI(
I SERV]

11. No. 90

ANN AR3Oi l MICHIGAi THURSDAY, JAkUARY 26, 1922

PRICE

"Rica

r

9FARMER TO BOARU'
15 iMPRACTICABLEI
-CALHOUN
BELIEVES AGRICULTURISTS CAN-
NOT BE HELPED BY
BILL -
CLAIMS ACTION WOULD
BE CLASS LEGISLATION
Says.Federal Reerve System Must Be
Free of Polities to Function
Properly
That the attempt by the "agricultur-
al bloc" in the senate to force the
passage of a special act of congress
p rovidinig for the appointment of a
"dirt farmer" to theFederal .Reserv
board is far-reaching in its possible
consequences, is the opinion of Prof.
W. P. Calhoun of ,the economics de.
partment.
Is Dangerous tep
"An act of this kind would dye leg-1
islktion in favor of a particu ar class
or special interest," said Professor
Calhoun. "To function properly and
to serve the best interests of the en-
tire country, the board must be able
to act free from all forms of political
pressure in the interests of a' special
class.-
"The danger lies not in having a
farmer on the board, but in the prece-
dent of recognizing the claims of any
particula' economic interest to spe-
cial representaton on the Federal Re-
serve board. This is a dangerous step
and if the claims of one economic
group for special rights are just, they
are equally just for other groups,"
said Professor Calhoun.
Would Have Little Effect
"It is at present quite possible for
a farmer to become a director in one
of the federal reserve banks, as the
present law provides for three repre-
sentatives of business and agricultural
interests on the directorate of each
bank. e
"Membership on the Federal Re-
serve board for a 'dirt farmer' is
bound to have little effect on the rur-
al credit 'situation. As the board
makes no loans whatsoever, the spe-
cial representative of the agricultural
interests would have little influence.
Federal reserve credits are establish-
ed through the regional banks, 12 in
w number. The federal reserve banks,
in turn, have no control over the loan
policies of the member banks.
(Continued on Page Six) d
GIBBS TO SPEAK SA
ON ORATORICAL COURSE
HIS RECENT EXPERIENCES IN
RUSSIA WILL BE SUB-
JECT
President Marion L. Burton will in-
troduce Sir Philip Gibbs, noted novel-
tst, writer, and lecturer, When he com-
es to speak on the Oratorical course
of lectures at 8 o'clock Saturday night,
Jan. 28, in Hilr;auditorium.
Sir Philip, who has been character-
ized as "a trained observer who sees
beneath the surface of things and has
won a reputation by fearlessly present-
ing to the public a view of the world
as he sees it," will deliver a lecture
on "What I Saw in Russia."
This lecture is said to be as grip-
ping in them as his famous lecture of
last season on the Irish situation
which drew immense rowds and is
still discussed.
Besides engaging in the field of
journalism two of Gibbs' books have
attracted attention. "Now It Can Be

Told," and "More That Can Be Told."
His dramas written in collaboration
with Cosmo Hamilton have been suc-
cessfully playd, his "Menders of
Nets" receiving distinction.
DIPHTHERIA TESTS TO BE
* WIVEN BY HEALTH SERVICE
Students desiring to take the Schick
tests for determining their immunity
to diphtheria will again be given an
opportunity today. The tests will be
given at the University Health service
this afternoon, beginning at 2 o'clock.
These tests have been given every
Thursday during the past few weeks
in an effort to keepcdown the number
of diphtheria cases to a minimum.
CHIES TRYOUTS
All freshmen wishing to tryout.
for Chimes business staff the
second semester, report at the
Chimes office in the Press build-
ing this or tomorrow afternoon

Jtfichigamua
Takes Warpath

HARDING TAKES
FIRlST PART IN
ARMS PARLEYi

Greeks Invented Politics, Asserts
Professor Zimmern In Address

Listen to this tale of romance
Told of Indian warriors bold.
In the early Moon of New Hearts
Came they forth the stoics valiant.
Forth they romped to Great Chief's
wigwam
But he came not forth to greet them.
Long belov'd but now departed
Dwells he now with Manitou.
Round the Mighty Oak of Tappan
Circled Michigamua's red men
Circled yelling, screaming Indians
In their war paint, colors flying.
3y the tree of Indian legend
Stood the Whiteman pale and trembl-
ing; %, ,
Warriors choice of paleface nation;
Choice of tribe to run their gauntet.
Down the warriors, painted demons,
Swooped and caught their prey, like
eagles.
Loud the war cry stirred the stillness
As they seized their helpless captive.
'Forth they bore him to their wigwam
T~laere to torture at their pleasure,
There all ate round glowing camp fire,
Heard the words of mighty wisdom,
Smoked the pipe of peace and friend-
ship,
Thus there came to Michigamua:
Fielding H. Yost.
J1P BOOTH TICKTS
TO GO ON SAE TODAY
HOUSE PARTY PERMISSION MUST
BE HAD BEFORE MAKING
APPLICATION
Tickets for booths for the J-Hop
may be purchased from 2 to 5 o'clock
tolay at the information booth in the
Union lobby, according to A. C. Gib-
son, '23D, in charge of booths.
Cards granting permission for house
parties or a signed list of rules must
be presented before a booth will be
sold. Copies of these rules may be
found at the desk in the Union.
Cost Thirty Dollars
Men representing organizations or
groups of independents not holding
'ouse parties for the Hop should sign
these rules. The booths will sell for
$30.
At a meeting of the ticket committee
held late last night it was decided,
contrary to its first decision,'that each
booth will be. allowed one chaperone
ticket without extra charge. Each
ticket allowed admission to one pa-
tron and one patroness.
Arrange for Pictures
Representatives may arrane for
sittings for group pictures to be tak-
en at the Hop. The schedule for these
pictures will be made out at this time.
STUDENTS A SKED TO LIST
BOOKS AT EXCHANGE TODAY
Files Already Include Large Number
of Volumes Open for
Purchase
Students who have books to list with
the Union book exchange service
shoud have them catalogued beween
4 and 5:30 o'clock this afternoon at
desk three in the student activities'
room of the Uwon.
This applies both to books for sale
and books wanted. The informaton
will be catalogued in two flies, which
will be easily accessible. Title of the
volume ,author, edition, condit'on and
every desired detail will be given, and
the parties can then make their own
deal as to the price.
A considerable number of books
have been listed, the books for sale be-
ing listed in larger numbers than the
othe's, due no doubt to the approach-
ing end of the semester. The service
is open from 4 to 5:30o'clock on Mon-
days and Thursdays. No books will be
brought to the Union, the purpose of
the service' being only to bring buyer
and seller together so that no profit
need be paid on an exchange.
"37 PER CENT OF OUR SCHOOLS
FIRETRAPS," SAYS BOYDON

"Thirty-seven per cent of the school
buildings of this country are fire-
traps," said H. C. Boydon of the Port-
land Cement association yesterday in'
an address before the Rotary club at
the Chamber of Commerce in this city.
"Nnety-flue per cent of the school
buildings are not fireproof, and we
waste about a quarter of a billion
dollars annually in school fires," he
said.
"This fact ought to be an incen-
tive," he said, "to build fireproof
buildings as safe as possible."
Prof. Riggs- Talks at U. of D.
Prof. Henry E. Riggs of the cival
engineering department addressed the
students of the school of eng'neering
of the University of Detroit last night
on "Water Transportation-Rivers,
Canals, and Great Lakes."

URGES CHINESE TO ACCEPT'
LATEST COMPROMISE
OFFER

THE;

SUCCESS OF MOVE
RES"TS WI [H PEKIN

Settlement Ireals Only with
of Tsingtao-Tsinanfu
Railroad

Return

(By Associated Press)
Washington Jan. 25. - The aid of
President Harding has been enlisted
by the arms delegates to bring Ja-
pan and China into agreement on
Shantung.'
Taking a direct hand in the Wash-
ington negotiations for the first time,
the President today urged the Chi-
nese to accept the latest compromise
offer and thus remove from the field
of controersy a subject which has
become a serious barrier to the prog-
ress of the whole conference.
Ready to. Accept
Whether the move is to succeed ap-
pears to rest largely with Peking.
The Japanese already have indicated
informally their willingness to make
the principal concession proposed, and
the President approached the Chinese
only after the Japanese ambassador
had informed the state department
that his government was ready to ac-
cept a tender of good offices.
The settlement p'an sponsored by
Mr. Harding deals only with the re-
turn of the Tsingtao-Tsinanfu rail-
road, substantially all other ques-
tions having been agreed upon in the
separate exchanges between the Jap-
anese and Chinese.-
Would Abandon Loan
Under the proposal Japan would
abandon her proposition for a loan
to China and the latter would pur-
chase the road with treasury note
payable at her option 5 to 15 years
hence. China would receive posses-
sion within 5 years but would with-
draw 'her opposition to retention of
the Japanese traffic manager and
chief accountant during the period of
payment.
TwoPlays Given
By Players Club
Well Presentfed
(By Lillan Scher)
When the curtain rang down'on the
"Wonder Hat" last evening at the
P ayers club entertainment, the audi-
ence did not know who was going to
win the lovers' controversy - Colum-
bien or Harlequin, but everyone was
satisfied. This was a decidedly en-
tertaining piece with excelent acting
by all the characters, humorous lines,
and very effective staging.
The "Neighbors" were old-fashioned
enough to be real neighbors, and they
settled their little problems very sat-
isfactorily, although some rather hu-
morous d:fficulties were involved and
everything turned out rather pecu-
liarly.
The bashful Peter, Lawrence Dorn-
bos, '22, was the hit of the evening.
The audience held its breath, figeted,
and turned its imaginary hats with
him. Especially good also in the per-
formances were Margot, Beatrice San-
dlse, '23, Punchinel o, Martin Comp-
ton, H. S. Miss Trot, Helen Kane, '23,
and Miss Moran, Celia Simonson, '23
Altogether the plays were unusually
good, as well as the entertainment be-
tween acts by Esther Hollands, '21, as
soloist.
Elliott Appointed
S.C.A. Preident
Phillips P. Elliott, '22, was appoint-
ed to succeed Hugh W. Hitchcock,
'22, as president of the Student Chris-
tian association at a meeting of the
cabinet yesterday afternoon. The ap-
pointment will take effect at the be-
ginning of next semester.
Hitchcock, who was elected to the
presidency at the campus election last
spring, resigned from his position be-
cause he is graduating from the Uni-
versity in February. Elliott has been
one of the vice-presidents of the S.
C. A.
A report of the recent S. C. A. drive
for $4,000 was made at the cabinet
meeting. Despite the fact that the

campaign fell more than $1,500 short
of the required amount, it was de-
cided not to try to raise any more
money this semester.

'It was the Greeks who invented
politics," said Prof. Alfred E. Zim-
mern, formerly of Oxford university,
am his lecture on "Greek Political
Thought in Relation to Modern Prob-
lems," delivered yesterday afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
"They were the first to ask themselv-
es the political question, 'How can we
best manage our community affairs'?"
Gives Political Rule
"The Greeks laid down one practical
political rule, that the essence of free
government is that every, one should
be at once the ruler and the govern-
ed, a combination of responsibility
and obedience. In that respect Amer-
ican government is nearer to that of
the Greek's than European govern-
ment is," asserted Professor Zimmern.
"There are two outstanding features
in Greek political thought," the pro-
fessor continued, "first, that the
Greeks never lost sight of the rea-
tion between politics and ethics. They
realized that in all political action
there is a cohesive morality. Second,
that to the Greeks politics was always
a realistic'study. They worked from
facts to theories and not from theories
to facts. The Greeks invented the
psychological method in politics; they
BOOSTERS ARE TOLDOOf.
FIELDS FOR ENDIY
SPEAKERS AT MEETING LAST
NIGHT STRESS CLUB'S POS-
SIBILITIES
"There are three definite ideas which
the Michigan Boosters club ought to
carry out: To help students learn
how to use their time; to make a bet-
ter contact between the University and
the town; and to create a better under-
standing between the University and
the alumni," said Prof. R. M. Wenley
in his address last night before the
Michigan Boosters club at Lane hall.
,"The average student 'doesn't know
how to use his time;" declared Profes-
sor Wenley.
Yost Speaks
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of
'ntercollegiate athletics, in speaking
't the meeting said "This organiza-
tion can do a most wonderful thing
for Michigan. It can make a good stu-
dent body, and it can accomplish this
object mainly through loyality to a
purpose, and loyalty to the Univer-
slty."
George 0. Brophy, '22L, Charles W.
Graham, and Mason P. Rumney. '08E,
also spoke at the meeting. Brophy
spoke on the relation of the Boosters
club to campus activities.
Talks as Alumnus
Graham showed that the purpose of
the club was to help direct all forms
of social life on the campus. Mason
Rumney, speaking from the point of an
alumnus, said that the club ought to
keep the alumni in contact with al-
umni.
Elton E. Wieman, '21, was tastmast-
'r for the program.
Work Of 'ach
To Open Recital
Winifred Dickinson of the School of
:Music, wi.l give the next recital on
the Twilight organ series at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditor-
ium. She is an advanced student un-
der the tutelage of Earl V.Moore and
is considered one of the most talented
of the students in this department.
Bach's prelude in E flat minor will
open her program, This prelude, the
St. Anne's, so-ca'led from the St. An-
ne's chorale, "0 God Our Help in Ages
Past," on which the work is based, is
representative of that period in Bach's
life known as the "mature master per-
iod." This will be followed by the
Pastorale from the Widor symphony
No. 2, a selection written in the style
of the rustic idyll.

Caprice (The Brook) by Dethier is a
work bordering on programme music,
±n which the French organist pictures-
quely traces the growth of a brookto
to mighty stream. Zonnet's "Ange-
us du Soir," and Schminke's "Marche
Russe," will conclude the program.
CROSS TO GIVE ILLUSTRATED
LECTURE ON TAHITI FRIDAY
"Tahiti and the Tahitians" will be
+he subject of an illustrated lecture to
be given by Prof. Arthur Lyon Cross,
of, the history department, at 3
o'clock Friday afternoon in the Pres-
byterian church under the auspices of
th Women's Missionary society.
The lecture is free to the public.1
These slides will probably not be'
shown again in Ann Arbor and con-
sequently those desiring to see them
should take advantage of this oppor-
tunity,

tried to analize men, the raw material
of politics."
Politics Worthwhile
"The Greeks have taught us that
politics are worthwhile," stated Pro-
fessor Zimmern in conclusion. "That
although they may be uninteresting
and sordid, yet it is our business to
attend to them. And above all the
Greeks have taught us that politics
are ,a matter not only to feel about
bit to think about, and that it is more
important to think about them than to
feel about them."
Professor Zimmern's second lecture,
"The Political Framework of Econ-
omic Policy," will be given at 4:15
o'clock today in the Natural Science
auditorium.
Pygmalion' Cast
To' Play Before
St. Clair Alumni
"Pygmalion," by George Bernrd
Shaw, which was presented in Ann
Arbor last week by the Comedy club,
will play in PortRuron and Mt. Clem-
ens on Friday and Saturday, Feb. 17
and 18, according to arrangements
just completed. The same cast that
was so, favorably received by the Ann
Arbor audience at the Whitney thea-
ter performance will make the trip.
"Bunty Pulls the Strings," last
year's Comedy club play, which was
also under the direction of Prof. 3.
Ralegh Nelson, of the. English de-
partment, played last year in Port
Huron and the success of the produc-
tion is stated by the St. Clair County
Alumni association as the reason for
the request to give this year's play. A
meeting of the Port Huron alumni ex-
ecutive committee is being held to,
morrow to complete plans for the per-
formance, with the purpose of provid-
ing entertainment for the visiting stu-
dents.
. CAU UGSED DAMAGE
ESTIMATED AT 525,000
BLAZE BELIEVED TO BE DUE TO
DEFECTIVE FLUE IN
CHIMNEY
Fire broke out at the home of Prof.
George W. Paterson at 2101 Hill
street last night, causing an estimat-
ed damage of $25,000 to $30,000.
No one was home at the time the
fire began, Mrs. Paterson is at -the
present time visiting her son Robert,
United States counsel at Liverpool,
Englan'd. Professor Paterson, at the
time, was dining at the Apostle's
club.
Remove Valuables
Mrs. J. A..Bursley, a neighbor of
the Paterson's, first discovered the fire
on the roof of the residence about 7
o'clock and immediately phoned for
the city fire department. While the
engines were on their way she di-
rected a handful of willing students
to remove such valuables as furni-
ture, rugs, and linens.
Cause Unknown
The cause of the fire is unknown.
It was thought by the chief of the
department, however, that the flames
resulted from a defective flue and
started around the chimney. The
greatest damage was caused by the
interior being soaked and flooded with
water. The third floor was almost a
total loss, while the first and second
floors were badly damaged by water.
The property was insured for $20,-
000.

NEW VOTING F
IS PRESENTE[
STUDENT COt
PROPOSES THAT ALL TO
REGISTERED BEFO
BALLOTING
WOULD INVOLVE I
CHECKS IN TABUL.

General Disapproval Voiced on
ent System with Sweepin
Changes Suggested
Fraud proof election plans,
ed to eliminate irregularities I
pus elections, were presente
night to the Student council.
Three checks to determine th
ity of results, are embodied
proposal. The checks would
way interfere with the secrecy
ballots.
Will Consider Plan
The council ordered the a
ment of a committee to determi
practicability of the plan. Co
able comment voicing disappr
the existing system of electio
made at the meeting. Hope w
pressed that either the plan i
ed last night, or some other w
scheme, be drawn up in time
coming spring elections.
A system of registration is in
in th proposal given the coun
night. This registration wot
held before a certain date 'to
ignated by the council each ye
Following the registration, cl
ficers, who would be in charge
prepare a list of qualified vo
their class, to be submitted
election committee of the c
Persons whose .names appear c
list would be the only ones
allowed to vote in campus ele
Three Checks Proposed
Checks from registration i
ballots, and from ballots to re
tion list, and finaily an auditin
ess by a council committee, -
for the elimination of all fraud
officers would be in charge of e
booths, which would be designa
cording to classes. These
would submit results at their
to the council committee. The
cil, committee in turn, would
the ballots, to check the
reached by the class count. T
al check would determine the
result of the election.
The council will continue
sion of the plan at its next m
The committee appointed to
tigate the plan will report a
time. This committe consists- o
F. Boxell, '23L, chairman,- H
Wilson, '22, George W. Mc
'22E, T. P. Banks, '22, and Fr
Andrews, '22A.

_

11O CLASSES ASK

Fi

ALUMNUS CONTAINS ARTICLE
ON RECENT SPEECH BY YOST
"The Function of College Athletics,"
an article which is taken from a re-
^ent speach by Coach Yost, is printed
in this week's Michigan Alumnus
which comes off the press today. There
is also an article about the proposed
.campus theater and one about the pre-
sentation of "Pygmalion" by the Com-
edy club..
"What the- Michigan Alumni in St.
Louis Are Doing," is an interestinf
article telling how the alumni of that
Mity are interesting high school sen-
iors in Michigan. The recent changes
in the faculties of the University are
also mentioned in another article.
COLDS KEEP PROPESSORS
FROM ATTENDING CLASSES
Prof. A. G. Canfield. bead of the de-
rartment of romance languages, Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister, of the public
sneaking department. and Prof. Ralrh
W. Aigler have been confined to their
homes with severe colds. None of
these men will he able to met any
classes this week.

HONOR, EXAMS AS
PETITIONS MUST BE HANDE
AT ONCE TO FULFILL
REGULATIONS
After interviews with several
professors and instructors of tI
erary college who teach class
which seniors and juniors pred
ate, it was found that none c
c'asses had yet petitioned for
inations under the honor system
Most of the pro ssors were e
ly in favor of.the 1onor system
aminations, giving as reasons th
that most of their examinations
conducted more or less on the
system anyway as they do not
the class during the examinE
and that they were tin favor of
examinations as it would allow
much more time to themselves
Since a ruling of the faculty
'iterary college provided that a
tion must be circulated Amon
members of each class desiring t
the examination under the hono
+em and that it must be presen
the instructor a week previous
examination, those classes in
the majority are seniors and j
that desire such examinations
Petition for them immediately.
DAILY TRYOUTS
Students wishing to tryout
positions on The Daily edito
staff are asked ' to report at
I Press building at 3 o'cl
I this afternoon. Although sec
I semester freshmen are eligibi
1 general knowledge of the canI
t is advisable.

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