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January 22, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-22

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I

SNOW FLURRIES; PROB.
ABLY' COLD WAVE

r

A irw" I uit

*ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

.of

VOL. XXXII. No. 87

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 1922

PRtICE FIVE

Pr /. Van Tyne Received In Pomp

Emg[CMPOWERS LEAGUEl
TO INCRPRAE

s

DEVELOPMENT OF ASSOCIATION'S
WORK TOWARD BUILDING
OUTIIED'
TENTATIVE PLANS FOR
EDIFICE REVIEWED
Burton, Sundwal Speak at Lncheon
of Organizing Body
Yesterday
Incorporation of the University of
Michigan League Building association
was authorized and an organization
was perfected at the mid-winter meet-
ing of the Alumnae council yesterday
morning. Mrs. E. D. Pomeroy, '96
president of the council, outlined the
development of the plans for a wom-
en's building to be known as the Uni-
versity of Michigan League.
Reports Given ....
Following the report on group or-
ganization made by Mrs. Evans Hol-
brook, '03, measures were taken to or-
ganize Michigan alumnae in Adrian,
Benton Harbor, Birmingham, Cadil-
lac, Co'dwater, Hillsdale, Ypsilanti,
Dayton, Ohio, and Cincinnati, Ohio.
The treasurer's report was read 'by
Mrs. H . J. Goulding, '98, and Edna
Groff, '22, presented the report of the
Women's league.
At the luncheon given in the Union
for the Alumnae council and guests
President Marion L. Burton extended
a greeting and spoe briefly of the
need for a women's building. Dr. John
Sundwall talked on physical educa-
tion for women, emphasizing the n-
cessity for a threefeld program for
women which would inc'ude health
and physical culture as well as men-
tal development. Mrs. E. D. Pomeroy
acted as toastmistress at this lunch-
eon.,
Tentative building plans which ar-
rived from Chicago yesterday morning
were displayed at the afternoon ses-
sion of the council. These plans are
the first to be drawn and will be mod-
ified to meet the needs of the wom-
en's organizations that are to be cen-
tered in the building. f
Pledges Fixed
Reports were read by the chairmen
of standing committees and acted up-
on. After a discussion it was decid-
ed that the $2,400 which is the amount
pledged by groups of alumnae for th
support of the campaign up to June,
1922, be raised by the groups on the
basis of a minimum of $2 per alumna.
It was also decided that each delegate
should come to the June council pre-
pared to pledge a definite amount for
the campaign expenses during the
year 1922-23
The remainder of the session was
given over to a general discussion of
the work of the council.
SUN Y SER ICES IN
ANN ABO0 CURHE
Two college presidents speaking in
Ann Arbor churches in addition to an
out of town minister, an official in a
psychopathic clinic, a superintendent
of a hospital in India, a number of
faculty members and a state secretary
of one of the churches make today an
outstanding date in church circles.
Dr. Murray Bartlett, president of
Hobart college at Geneva, N. Y., and
long prominent in educational fields,
will speak at 10:30 o'clock this morn-
ing at St. Andrew's Episcopal church.
He will also speak at the supper,
which is open to all, that will be held
at the church at 5:30 o'clock .
Dr. W. Douglas Mackenzie, presi-
dent of the Hartford Theological
seminary of Hartford, Conn., will
speak at 10:30 o'clock this morning at
the Congregational church on the
subject, "The Measure of Devotion to
Christ." He will also speak to the
Congregational Students association
at 7 o'clock.
"Christ Giving Living Water" will be
the topic of the sermon by Rev. C. A.
Brauer at St. Paul's Lutheran church

at the service in English at 11:301
o'clock.
(Continued on Page Four)

SophomoresDance
At Class ixer
Two hundred members of the class
of '24 gathered in the parlors of Bar-
bour gymnasium yesterday for a class
mixer, at which the three reception
rooms of the gymnasium were used
for dancing.
Music for the occasion was furnish-
ed by Rhoades' five-piece orchestra.
Between the dances wafers and punch
were served. The mixer yesterday is
the second event of the program ar-
ranged by the social committee for the
year.
The committee has plans for anoth-
er mixer and a smoker to be held
some time after the opening of the
next semester, before the Soph Prom.
IN GOYITPLANNED

Departments' Functions Would
Changed Under Scheme Before
Harding

Be

SAID THAT ARMY AND NAVY
MAY BE UNDER ONE HEAD
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 21.-Plans for re-
organization of the government de-
partments as worked out by Walter
F. Brown, chairman of the joint con-
gressional commission charged with
that task, were laid before President
Harding today, but were not made
public pending consideration of them
by the President and his cabinet and,
their transmission to congress.
The reorganization proposals are
said to embody recommendation for
the consolidation of the war and navy
departments into, one department,, to
be known as the department of na-
tional defense and for creation of a;
new department to be called the de-'
partment of public welfare
The best information available was
that other transfers to be recommend-
ed were as follows:
The bureaus of good roads and mar-
kets from the department of agricul-
ture to the department of commerce
the forest service from the depart
ment of agriculture to the interior de-
partment; the patent office and th
bureau of education from the interior
department to th new public welfare
department; the coast guard service
from the treasury to the new depart-
ment of national defense; and the
consolidation of all the secret serv-
ice agencies of the government to the
department of justice.
URSE OPEN DEALING
IN FAR, EAST DIPLOMAC
TWO MORE AMERICAN RESOLU-
TIONS ADVOCATE FAIR PLAY,
IN TRADE FIELDS
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 21.-- Two more
American resolutions based on the
principle of open diplomacy and open
door of commercial opportunity with
China were adopted today by the Far
Eastern committee of th Washington
conference.
The proposal for a show down of
all international agreements affecting
CIina's interests, presented Thursday
.by Secretary Hughes, was given com-
mitte approval only after it had been
"freighted" with upwards of a score
of amendments, the American spokes-.
man insisted tonight that its meaning
had not been materially changed.
Under a supplemental declaration
proposed by Elihu Root and accepted
with little debate, the powers agreed
not to support in the future any en-
gagement designed to create central
spheres of influence of exclusive op-
portunity in Chinese territory..
Taken- together the two decisions
were hailed in American quarters as
beginning a new era of open feeling
and fair play in all that pertains to
china's economic development.
Chamber of Commerce to Meet
Directors of the Chamber of Com-

DECIDE PROGRAM
FOR SPOTLIGHT
Show Will Include Musical, Dancing,
Dialogue Acts by Campus
Talent
TICKETS FOR VAUDEVILLE TO
BE PLACED ON SALE MONDAY
Final arrangements have been made
'or the annual Union Spotlight to be
given at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday night
at Hill auditorium, and tickets will go
-n sale tomorrow at Graham's, Wahr's
and Slater's bookstores and on the
campus.
Good Talent
The complete program contains
four acts selected from some of the
hest talent on the campus, according
o those in charge of the program.
Many acts -which were being planned
on the program, were dropped in or-
ier to keep down the time to two
hours and prevent any interruption to
school work. The final arrangement
will provide a short snappy evening's
entertainment, without any of the
tiresome "dragging out" of past
-hows.
The first act on the program is a
3inging and comedy feature by
James J. Johnson, '23, who will intro-
duce several new songs, accompanying
Tiimself on the piano. Arthur H. Hold-
en, '24, and Howard B. Welch, '24, will
appear in a "chinning, singing, and
-lancing" skit with Welch unperson-
i.ting a member of the "fairer" sex.;
His ability along this line was ably
proved to all who attended the Union
opera performances.
Music Foremost
Four harmonizers in the form of a
vocal quartette will contribute to the
entertainment of the evening. Paul
Wilson, '23L, Thomas I. Underwood.
'23L, Albert F. Schirmer, '22E, and
Don .C Reed, '23, will sing several
Wchigan songs and popular hits. Top-
ping off this diversified bill will be a
musical act, put on by Myron E. Chon,
23, Paul R. Wilson, '23L, and their
able syncopators.,
FORD OFFER ACCPTABE
SAYS PROFESSOR WHITE,
BETTER BID FOR MUSCLE SHOALS
NOT FORTHCOING, HE
CLAIMS
Speaking before the junior engi-
'eers in room 348 Engineering build-
'ng Friday, Prof A. H. White, head of
the chemical engineering department,
stated that to his mind the govern-
ment would never receive a better of-
fer for the Muscle Shoals plant than
that one recently made by Henry
Ford.
Professor White, as a colonel dur-
ing the war, was for a time in charge
of ;he government nitrate plant at
Muscle Shoals and consequently his
statements are based on first hand
knowledge of the conditions in that
part of the country and the value of
the plant.
By comparison with the Ohio, he
showed the size of the Tennessee
river and its importance to the south.
He pointed out that, except for the
two dams at the Shoals, the Tennessee
was navigable. He called attention to
the fact that the South feels that im-
provements in the river at Muscle
Shoals would benefit the Southern
states. "Fertilizer from the Shoals,",
said he, "is used by the Atlantic coastj
and the Gulf states and these states
feel that a manufacturing plant at,
that place would be advantageous." 1
He spoke of the offer made by Hen-
ry Ford and said that it was doubt-1
ful if a better offer could be made by1
any man or group of men. He said
that Ford's proposition would return
but a small profit on the investmet

and that it would return the property
to the government at the end of 100
years. "I believe," he continued, "that
a better offer will never be made, and
I believe that Ford has made his last,
offer. I believe the government should
accept."
Engagement Announced by Student
Announcement 'was made last night

Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the history
department, arrived safely in Bombay,
India, on Dec. 11, according to letters
received by Mrs. Van Tyne, President
Marion L. Burton and Prof. J. S.
Reeves, written on the day of his ar-
rival. At the request of the Briti
government Professor Van Tyne As
studying the transitional government
being tried in India as well as the gen-
eral political conditions there, about
which he will write a book.
The letter received by President
Burton reads as follows:
"My first day in India was spent un-
der the most delightful circumstances.
While our ship was yet a thousand
miles from Bombay the captain receiv-
ed a wireless asking whether Profes-
sor Van Tyne was on board. He
wired that I was and soon after I got
a wireless from the governor of Bom-
DETROIT SYMPHONY
PLAYSTOMOR
Orchestra, Here for Third Concert
This Year, Gives All Russian
Program
GABRILOWITSCH TO PERFORM
AS PIANIST, CONDUCTOR
An all Russian program will be pro-
vided by Ossip Gabrilowitsch and the
Detroit Symphony orchestra, when
this organization appears in Ann Ar-
bor for the third time this season at
8 o'clock tomorrow night in Hill aud-
itorium.
Besides the strictly orchestral num-
bers from the works of Gnka and
Rimsky-Korsakoff, there will be a
Rachmaninoff concerto with Mr. Ga-
brilowitsch as piano soloist, Victor
Kolar, conducting in this number. The
pianist has appeared in Ann Arbor
as a concert artist in seasons past,
but tomorrow's performance will be
his first in this city in the dual role
,f rianist and conductor. '
The complete program will be as
ollows:
Overture "Russian e Ludmillia"
.Glinka '
Second Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra in C minor. Opus
18...'..........Rachmaninoff
Moderato1
Adagio sostenuto
Allegro scherzando
At the Piano -- Mr. Gabrilowitsch
Orchestra under direction of
Victor Kolar
N Intermission f
Symphonic Suite "Scherherazade"'
.Rinsky-Korsakofft
I. The Sea and the Vessel of Sind-t
badc
II. The Tale of the Kaendar Prince
III. The Young Prince and the Youngt
Princess -
IV. Feast at Bagdad. The Sea. The
Vessel Is Wrecked on a Rock.1
Conclusion. 7
CITY GAS COMPANY
REDUCES CHARGESt
Gas rate reductions, which became
effective Jan. 1, were announced byI
the Washtenaw Gas company yester-
day afternoon. In addition to reduc-
ing the rates, the gas company will
also refund to the consumers of the
city money on all bills paid during
the last three months of 1921.
The new-year rates are 15 centst
below the old rates on all classes of1
business. For the first 5,000 feet the
new rate will be $1.25, while from
5,000 to 200,000 feet the rate will bex
$1.05, and above 200,000 feet the price
will be 85 cents. These prices aret
subject to no discount.
In accordance with arrangements
with the city, the gas company may
earn only the per cent of interest on
its valuation and working capital

equal to the average rate at whicht
itA funded debt is carried. In connec-
tion with the earnings of the com-
pany an expert accountant of the
State Public Utilities commission will
audit the 'books of the company for
1921. This auditing was arranged up-
on request of the gas company.

bay asking me to stay at the Govern-
.en, ihouse on my arrival.
1TWit s.Um ilules
As the uoat ap rox;fea tue dock I
saw tour or live ±uuposing ngures in red
avery Wu a grea tirass tiueuas ou
their breasts. Near them were a nun-
uer of figures in white, wearing white
turpies This was my retinue. I was
greeted by an A. 1. C. who set w.t
the custom rules asiae and took me to
an auo surrounded by a guard.
In this stage we drove sour miles to
the uovernmnenthouse on Malanar hill
wnere as we drove up the long beauti-
ful avenue pined wish trees, tmen in red
Iuiturm stood stany homing higu
spears and vowing, and covering their
eyes with their hands--D.inued Dy
,ur splendor I suppose.
teecs 'ronmuu it statesmen
After tea which I had with their ex-
ceflencies we went out to the tennis
court where "their exLeljencies" play-
ed tennis, with four little boys dress-
in red livery to chase the balls, and
a man in red livery to bring them
drinks from a table nearby.
On the boat I made the acquaintance
of several of the Indian leaders, Sir
Sakaran Nair, Mr. Gupta, and Mr. Sak-
lakwalla, and I learned much of the
Indian political mentality. Sir Sark-
aran has agreed to arrange for me
an interview with Gandhi, the great
Indian leader. I became acquainted
with a number of men who have been
in India for 25 or 30 years. Mr. Pad-
isson, collector and magistrate in Mad-
ras, and Mr. Clow, secretary to the
viceroy. In fact, I have had many
offers -of help in every direction..
EXHIBIT OL E UI USH
BOOKS IN LIBRAY

rof. Van Tyne Received In Pomp
At lBombay; Meets Hindu Statesmen

PO TF STIL
HOVERS BET WE
DEATH, THOUGHT SURE
DAY, DELAYED AS P0
RALLIES
PHYSICIANS HOLD N
HOPE FOR RECO)
Long Hours of Suffering E
Momentarily to End Wi
Demise

INCLUDES FIRST EDITION
WORKS BY SEVENTEENTH
CENTURY AUTHORS

OFD

First editions of early English
mas, purchased, by Librarian W.

drA-
W.

Bishop. in London in Nov., 1920, have
been placed on exhibition in the lower
.corridor of the"Library. Of the 800
plays bought, aproximately 200 are
shown:
Three cases are devoted to drama or
the Restoration period, from 1660 to
the early eighteenth century. Among
them are works by Ravenscroft, Tate
and Crowne and also about a dozen
works by women of the time, including
plays by Mrs. Pix, Mrs. Manley and
Catherine 'T'rotter. Attention is called
to the quaint and cumbersome titles
of this period. The first collected
edition of the plays of Richard Steele
is shown, published about 1723. An-
other case shows the ninetenth cen -
tury work. introducing the use of the
colored frontispiece.'
One case of books of association in-
terest is shown. These include plays
from the library of Horace Walpo'e,
with his manuscript notes. Three'
plays are included which belonged to
Frances Maria Kelly, famous actress
o¢ the early nineteenth century and
close friend of Charles Lamb. An-
other item of association interest, in1
+he case with early dramas. is a 1630
play entitled, "Love's Whirligig,"
which belonged to Swinburne- the
poet.
LIBR ARTAN TALKS a
TO WOMEN'S CLUB'
Librarian W. W. Bishop addressed
the Ann Arbor branch of the American
Association of University Women on
"The Library Building" at their meet-
ing which was held yesterday after-
noon. He explained how through the
careful planning of the architects and
the librarians, the building was con-f
structed so as to utilize in the best
possible way the facilities for space1
and light.
In speaking of the required reading_
room, Mr. Bishop stated that its ac-I
cess and convenience saved each stu-1
dent an average of a month during
his four years of college work.
A tour of inspection through thie
Library was made by the association
members that they might better un-
derstand the in-ner functionings of,
the institution.

(By Associated Press)
Rome, Jan. 22 (2:15 ga. m.)-1
end of Pope Benedict's life is 4
at hand. This was announced wi
out qualification by the attendi
physicians. All hope had been del
itely abandoned, and at 2 a. m. a fa
issue was pronounced imminent.
There had been moments during S
urday when it was feared the
had come, but stimulants revived
pontiff, and his natural powers of
sistance carried him from the turni
point temporarily. The Holy Fati
seemed to cling to life, as did P
Pius X in 1914, when the anal o
come was in doubt for many hou
Doctor Battistini, the chief attendi
physician, visited the patient seve
times Saturday evening and throuj
out the night. Each time he said t
any minute might be the conclusi
of the long hours of suffering throu
which Benedict XV had passed i#41
fight for life.
The last announcement of the. e
ning to the -diplomatic representat
weeping in the ante-chamber .
made by Cardinal Castarri, the paj
secretary of state, who said:
"A catastrophe is imminent. Z
Holy Father is getting wrse a
worse. We must be prepared for I
inevitable."
Thecardinal's face was' downca
and sad. He spoke in quiet tones w
deep emotions, a .defected gesture
hand showing that he believed
Holiness was sinking rapidly.
WILL MAKE FINAL DRIVEI
TO REACH VS CIAI Qai
"RAPID FIRE" COMMITTEE WI
HOPE TO RAISE, BALANCE
IN SINGLE DAY
In an attempt to reach the quota i
in the drive for S. C.-A. funds me
bers of the organizations will lauE
a "rapid fire" campaign on one d
of next week. Every student whp I
not yet had an opportunity t st
scribe to the fund will be visited a
his subscription accepted by a me
her of the committee.
The "rapid fire" committee ill
composed of men who have volt
teered to visit at least 10 students w
have not as yet been approach
With the prompt co-operation of I
men who will be solicited it is ho
that the balance of $1,686.50 need
to reach the $4,000 goal, will
raised.
Committeemet who worked l
week are requested to return th
list cards to the office in tane lI
or to their team captains at once,
order to avoid the possibility of ca
ing upon men who have already be
solicited.
CAMP WILL SPEAK
ON PSYCHOTtHERAP
Dr. C. D. Camp, professor of neur
ogy in the Medical school, will lecti
at 4, o'clock tomorrow evening in
tural Science auditorium, on the "H
tory of Psychotherapy." This is I
second of a series of public lectui
given under the auspices P* Alp
Omega Alpha, honorary medical fr
ternity.
Influence of the mind upon the bo
in health and disease is a question
much popular discussion. This is
rare opportunity for students of m
icine and psychology to learn of t
branch of -therapy from one of t
leading authorities in neurology.

merce will meet at the Chamber, of at the Chi Omega house of the engage-
Commerce building tomorrow afterr ment of Irma M. Neumann, '20; to Don-
noon. The purpose of the meetingis ald F. Ensworth, of New York City.
for business as well as social. Ensworth is a Princeton graduate.

NNE"

4

Hill Auditorium

OSSIP GARILOWITSCH-Conductor and Pianist

Monday Eve.
January 23,

IN A BRILLIANT ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM, WITH

__ _

Tickets:
50c, $1.00,
$1.50 and
$2.00

the

Detroit

Symphony

Orchestra

., g

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