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January 21, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-01-21

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THE WEATHER
SNOW FLURRIES AND
WARMER TODAY

L

Air Ar Ar
an

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AD NIGHT WIU
B81icz

VOL. XXXII. No. 86 ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1922 PRICE FIVe CENTS

LITTLE HOPE HELD
OUT FOR BECOVERY
OFPOPEB EEI CT
ATTENDING PHYSICIANS DOUBT-
FUL OVER OUTCOME OF
RESTLESS NIGHT
PONTIFF'S TEMPERATURE
FALLS THREE DEGREES
Patient's Pulse Satisfactory, But Res.
piration Remains Extremely
Difficult
(By Associated Press)
Rome, Jan. 21, 12:15 a. m.--Profes-
sor Bateistini held out hopes that Pope
Benedict will.survive the night.
Professor Bateistini visited the Vat-
ican at midnight. He found the rest-
lessness of the patient had increased.
His pulse was satisfactory, but respir-
ation was frequent and difficult.
"I am not able to say whether the
Pontiff will survive the night,"'said
the physician. "The state of mind of
his holiness is perfectly quiet. He
smiled and exchanged playful words
with those around his bedside. The ad-
ministration of oxygen gave him great
relief."
Professor Bateistini said the catarrh
was still extensive and that several
centers of infection had developed in
his lungs. The physician tried to make,
the patient cough but failed to induce
expectoration.
The Pontiff's temperature continued
around 101, from which point it had
fallen from 104 during the day.
"If it pleases the Lord that I shall
work again for his church, I am ready;
if he says it is enough, let his will be
done."
These were the final words of Pope
Benedict when the Cardinal went frog
his chamber this evening. The Asso-
elated Press was told that the Pon-
tiff regained consciousness and that
he recognized the various prelates.
Pope Benedict Friday intrusted his
confidential will to Cardinal Gasparri,
the temple secretary, and his, private
will to his nephew, the Marquis Della
Chidsa.
NH 1WA Y SHORT CUSE
ENROLLS 83 ATOAT
-GRADUATES OF li/ANY COLLEGES
ATTEND TRANSPORT
SCHOOL
Registrations to date in the Uni-
versity's graduate short period cours-
es in highway engineering and high-
way transport for 1921-22 number
83. The courses this year commenc-
ed in December and will continue, in
seven two-week priods, until March
17.
Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard. of thej
department of highway engineering'
and highway transport. established
the courses here in 1919. During the
year 1919-20, 29 students were en-
ro'led; last season 45 attended the
courses. "The classes are specially
designed for mature men in prac-
tice," states Professor Blanchard.
"The University is the only institution
in the world offering courses.of this
character."
Men ranging in age from 22 to 52
are attending the courses. Only 12
of the registrants are Michigan grad-
uates. Several are present from Can-
ada, South America, Europe, and
Asia.
Schools represented are: Carnegie
Institute of Technology, Chalmers
Tchnical Institute, Sweden; Cornell
university, Dartmouth college, Iowa
State college, University of Kansas,

University of Lusanne, Switzerland;
University of Maine, Michigan Agri-
cultural college, Ohio Northern uni-
versity, University of Pekin, China;
and West Point.
Eighteen two-weeks courses are of-
fered during the seven periods. Each
course covers 15 hours a week, total-
ing 30 lecture hours -and giving cred-1
it, upon passage of the examination,
of two hours toward the' 24 needed
for the earning of a. degree of Mas-
ter of Science. Two years' attendance
for the full time of the courses will
thus entitle one to the degree, but as
each two-week course is complete in
itself many of the men attend for
several seasons for short lengths of
time.
Many Vets Present Claims
Veterans having claims on the gov-
ernment have kept the representatives
of the United States public health ser-
vice busy for the last few days. Yes-
terday afternoon a large crowd filled
the waiting room and there appears
to be no prospect of finishing the work
before noon today.

ManyNewspapers
Print Pictures Of
Michigan Opera
Newspapers front coast to, coast
published pictures of the 1922 Union
opera "Make tI for Two" which took
the longest tour in its history during
the Chistmas vacation. In the scrap
book of reviews and other comments
of the opera's performances which the
Union is keeping, there are clippings
from 14 states and'the accounts are
still coming in.
AlbertF. Schirmer, '22, whom crit-
les called the "he-vamp" of the
opera, in his silver gown, was used
as the subject for a majority of the
sketches. Schirmer's picture appear-
ed in papers all the way from the
state of Washington to Virginia.
Among the cities in which the pic-
ture was used outside the state of
Michigan and other thanhthe places
where the show was given, are: New
Orleans, Los 'ngels, Yakima, Wash.,
Sandusky, , Logansport, Ind.,
Springfield, Mo., Portsmouth, 0., Col-
orado Springs, Hot Springs,Ark.,
Sidney, 0., Orange, Tex., Muncie, Ind.,
Wapakoneta, 0., Uniontown, Penn.,
Milwaukee, Terre Haute, Ind., Mar-
siall, Tex., Roanoke, Va., Waco, Tex.,
Greenville, 0., Denver, Buffalo, and
Chillicothe, O.
FGRM ISCUSSES
COOPERATIVEPPLA
Definite Action Not Taken Pending
Investigation and Faculty
Student Meeting
COMMITTEE MAKES REPORT
SHOWING SUCCESS ELSEWHERE
Following the report of the investi-
gation committee, the advisability of
establishing a co-operative store at
Michigan was discussed at length by
the University Forum in its meeting
last night. After the adjournment of
the meeting definite plans were made
by those interested for further inves-
tigation and a report thereof is to be
made at a general mass meeting of
students and faculty members to be
arranged later.
Thecommittee of the Forum in its
report gave statistics an the organi-
zation and workings of co-operative
stores in 24 universities and colleges
of the country and dealt with many
phases of the project as had been
worked out in all parts of the coun,-
.try under widely varying conditions.
The committee making this report
consisted of Marten ten Hoor, chair-
man; Phillip E. Bursey, H. C. Carv-
er, H. J. Goulding, W. A. Paton, and
John B. 'Waite.
Following the report of the commit-
tee the Forum adjourned and all
those interested in the furtherance of
the co-operative project were invited
to remain and take part in the discus-
sion of .more definite plans.
At this later meeting it was decided
to appoint' a new committee to make
further investigation .and to arrange
for a general mass meeting of faculty
and students for the consideration of
the establishment of -such. a project
here. Especial emphasis was laid at
this time on the desirability of secur-
ng the ful participation of students
in the consideration of final plans.
The Forum is an organization of
faculty men but as an organization is
not officially connected with the Uni-
iversity so the business of this group
's not to be taken as an official Uni-
versity utterance.
FUNERAL oF PROFESSOR

SEMAN HELD YESTERDAY
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY REV.
HOWARD CHAPMAN AND REV.
A. L. WILKINSON

i " E I

ENDS $186 SHORT
OF - DESIRED COAL
ENTIRE SUM SUBSCRIBED COMES
TO TOTAL OF ONLY
$2,313.50
FINANCIAL CONDITIONS
BLAMED FOR SHOWINGI

Growing Abuse Of Reference
Privilege Threatens To Force
Change In Policy Of Library

i

CHICAGO IN"FIRST
DEBATE OF SEASH

Reports from Late Workers
Slightly Increase Friday's
Showing

May

Lacking $1,686.50 of its $4,000 quo-
ta, the S. C. A. campaign committee
definitely, closed its 'books last night
at the end of the final day of the
drive. The entire sum subscribed at
last reports last night amounted to
$2.313 50.
Yesterday, which was designated as
"clean up" day, netted a total of'
$261. Officials in charge of the drive
had hoped that approximately $1,000
would be subscribed on the conclud-
ing day. The failure of the drive was
ascribed to general financial condi-
tions.
Further Plans Unknown
Members of the committee in charge
of the soliciting expressed the belief
that the S. C. A. would not be samtis-
fled with this sum, and that an at-
tempt to make up the deficit will be
made next week under the directon
of some campus organization. What
actual shape these tentative plans will
take is not yet known.
Wendel Herrick, '23, was Individ-
ual high man for the entire campaign
with a total of $124.75 subscribed. His
nearest competitor was' Victor Meth-
od, '23, who collected $60.50. Stanton
Ellet, '23, came third with $47. These
three men head the fie'd for sums tak-
en in during all four days.
Riford, '23, Heads High Team
The high team for the entire drive,
under the captaincy of J. Ross Riford,
*23, reached a total of $197.15, with
the team captained by Edward T. In-
gle, '23, a close second with $191.50.
Riford's team came from behind yes-
terday and spurted past Ingle's, which
had previously topped the list.
Fraternities which subscribed to the
fund are: Acacia, Alpha Delta Phi,
Alpha Rho Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi, Be-
ta Theta Phi, Chi Psi, Chi Phi, De'ta
Kappa Epsilon, Selta Sigma Phi, Del-
ta Upsilon. Gamam Eta Gamma, Kap-
pa Sigma, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Epsi-I
lon Pi, Phi Kappa Psi, Phi Kappa Sig-
ma, Phi Sigma Delta, Psi Omega, Psi
Upsilon, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi, Theta
Delta Chi, Zeta Beta Tau. House clubs
which donated were Phylon and Cyg-
nus. Zeta Beta Tau was the largest
giver, and Phylon came second.
Although the campaign is cfficially
closed, reports were still coming in
at a late hour last night and several
teams had not yet been heard from.
It is expected, however, that these
late reports, will change the total but
little in comparison to the entire
shortage.
Fraernities which have not yet
made known their col'ections may
still do so today.
WOMEN'S MEETING DISCUSSES
MEMBERSHIP PIN FOR LEAGUE

Growing abuse by students of the
reference privileges in the main read-
ng rooms of the Library, increasing
gradually during the past few months
this year, has made necessary a warn-
ing issued yesterday by Librarian W.
W. Bishop. A list of 43 books that
have been lost between Sept. 1 and
Jan. 1 has been made out by the Li-
brary staff, after an exhaustive exam-
ination of all the stacks in the build-'
ing
The books that are placed on the
open shelves of the reading rooms are1
there only for the convenience of the1
student body and cannot be allowedI
to remain if the present practice be-1
comes serious, according to Mr. Bish-
op. A sum greater than $20,000 bas
been spent by the University within
the past three years from official;
funds to make the reference collection
as complete as possible. Continued
additions during that period haveI
madeit ascomplete as any collection
of its kind in the country and Libra-I
ry officials plan to make the few ac-1
cretions thought necessary if present1
practices among students cease. 1
The policy of establishing open
shelves for general reference purpos-
SHUTER CALS FOR
1923 OPERA BOOKS
Asks Prospective Authors, Compos-
ers to Consult Him Regarding
Contributions
APRIL 1 SET ,AS LAST DAY
FOR TURNING IN MANUSCRIPT
A call for books for the 1923 Union
opera was issued yesterday by E.
Mortimer Shuter,' director of the
opera. The time limit set is April
1, and absolutely no books will be
considered after that date for next
year's show. Late books will be filed
away for consideration the following
year. The Vast amount of revising
which must be done to put the work
into suitable form for production aft-
er it has been turned in by students
makes it imperative that all books
be in by April 1. Another reason for
making this date the deadline is that
costumes may be obtained early
enough to secure pictures for advance
work on the show.
Several men have already consult-
ed Mr. Shuter, and hive started' work
on their books. He will explain what
iA wanted from the authors, and can
be seen at practically any hour of the
day at the Union or at the Michigan
Union theater.
Music writers are also asked to see
the director immediately regarding
music for next year's production.
Compositions should be brought in at
once, for if they are not suitab'e for
opera use, they may be satisfactory
for the Mimes Repertoire company
that will play in the Mimes theater
this spring, the official opening of
which will be Friday, Feb. 17, when
"Make It for Two"kill be given.
This performance of the opera is in
addition to the J-Hop performance to
be given,Saturday afternoon, Feb-
11, at the Whitney theater.
100 COUPLES TAKE
IN DINNER DANCE
More than 100 couples attended the
first informal dinner dance given un-
der the direction of the Union last
night in the main dining room. The
"all was filled at all times during the
hours of dancing, from 6 to 8 o'clock,
and numbers of Union members were
turned from the doors for lack of
space.
The center of the hall was cleared
of tables and a special Union dance
orchestra provided music. The reg-
ular evening dinner was served dur-
ing the dancing, no extra charge be-
ing made for the special entertain-
ment.
The dances will be given regularly

if their popularity continues, accord-
ing to Edmund Fox, '22E, chairman of
the dance committee. The popularity
of the plan, as an innovation, at
least, is declared by Union officials
to be evidenced by the attendance last
night'and the satisfaction expressed
by those in attendance.
250 JUNIOR HOP TICKETS
DISTRIBUTED YESTERDAY
Tickets for the J-Hop were distribut-
ed to more than 250 yesterday at the
Union at the various hours when each
man was to call to purchase his ticket.
Ticket distribution will continue be-
tween the hours of 10 and 5:30 o'clock
today. The hour indicated on each
acceptance wil be strictly observed.

es was only instituted at Michigan
after long deliberation. The plan ha
been proven successful at other uni-
versities andpublic libraries through-
out the country, but any greater fi-
nancial loss through this source will
make further extension of the policy
impossible.
The idea of an organized attempt3
to steal books from the open shelves
was deprecated by Mr. Bishop, who
stated that carelessness was the sole
cause of the difficulty. Large num-l
bers of books are regularly returned
to the shelves 'after being reported
missing, although a few have been
lost altogether.
The fact that only 4 3out of a total
of $,500 books in the room are miss-
ing shows that the problem has not
as yet become serious. A continuationf
of the present abuses will mean,,how-I
ever, that some alteration must be
made in the Library's policy.
Aside from the actual financial loss
to the University and the serous
handicap to the efficiency of the Li-I
brary staff that result from careless
handling of the reference books, Mr.
Bishop called attention to the fact
that it is a definite injustice to othert
students and in addition a criminal£
offense under the statutes of theF
state. Most of the volumes that areI
missing are general text books fort
use in study and when these are ap-
propriated for personal use the restE
of the student body is deprived of itsI
reference sources.
PLAY GIVES RELIEF
FROM ORDINARY
AMERICAN DRAMA'
(By Elizabeth Vickery) ]
Easy, rippling speech so common'
among the Irish, and a delightful
brogue which was readily understood,
characterized the Irish players in
their presentation of "The White-
Headed Boy" given yesterday after-
noon at the Whitney theater under
the auspices of the American Univer-
sity Women of Ann Arbor for the ben-
efit of the University of Michigan
League.
The play itself was a relief from
the strain of the too popular problem
dramas of America, and, contrary to
public opinion, was not "high-brow" in,
any sense of the word. It was a playt
that would appeal to any audience and
it represented the highest type of
modern drama.
Concerns Plain Folks
The action concerned plain folks in
the ordinary circumstances of life
with the naturalistic acting of the
Irish stage, which removes alt as-
pects of the usual theatrical conven-
tions.
Marie O'Neill, as Aunt Ellen, hadj
undoubtedly kissed the Blarney stone
many times in order to have deceiv-
ed Arthur Sinclair, as John Duffy,
who had had much experience in that
line himself. She was a little less
shrewd than he. however, when she
allowed him to settle his proposed law
suit with two other members of the
family.
Arthur Shields, as Denis, the white-
headed boy, with his love for a life1
of pleasure and no work won the sym-
pathy of the audience as well as of
his family when be was to be turned'
out after his career as the spoiled
child. Sydney Morgan, as George, the
older brother, supplied the funds
while the remainder of the family suf-
fered and deprived themselves in or-
der to educate Denis, but even he
proved to be of as flexible character
as the others when the affairs rbaliy
cme to a climax. The family's love
for the spoiled boy and their desire
to maintain the prestige of "the Geog-
begans" manifested itself no matter
how much they tried to keep it down.
Realstic Expressions
Realistic facial expressions and
natural reactions were particularly
noticeable throughout the entire play.
The bubbling comedy of the plot was
greatly enhanced by the simple lan-
guage and-the true to life exclama-
tions of the players who were truly at
ease in all of their situations. As in

all modern Irish plays "it is the talk
that is important."_
Miss O'Neill and Arthur Sinclair
said that they had "seldom played to
a more glorious audience," when in-
terviewed. Sinclair played in the
Abbey theater, Dublin, in 1903 on the
first night when it was opened by
Miss Horniman. He played in Ann
Ardor seven years ago- with a group
of Irish players.
O'Brien Issues Warning
A warning to students to refrain
from riding on bob sleds behind auto-
mobiles was issued by Thomas O'Brien.
chief of rolice. yesterday. He said
that a large number of accidents are
caused in this way. most of them tak-
ing place at street corners.

JOHNSON, '2, RAMSDELL, '23, AND
BIGGE,'83, COMPOSE WIN.
NING TEAM
JUDGES ARE UNANIMOUS
IN AWARDING DECISION
Decide for Affirmative Team in Kansas
Industrial Court Plan
Question
BULLETIN
Evanston, Ill., Jan. 20.-Michigan de-
feated the Northwestern debating team
by a 2 to 1 decision here tonight.
Michigan deafted the University of
Chicago debating team in the first de-
bating contest of the season last night
in Hill auditorium.
The question was: "Resolved, That
the Kansas industrial Court plan of
adjusting in*dustrial disputes should be
adopted throughout the United States,"
with Michiga upholding the affirma-
tive and Chicago the negative. R. R.
Johnson, '23, E. T. Ramsdell, '23,
and G. E. Bigge, '23, represented Mich-
igan while Stanley Turnquist, George
Olmstead, and Jerome Hall spoke for
the Maroon.
/Given Twelve Minutes
Each speaker was given twelve min-
utes for his contaructive speech and
five minutes for rebuttal.
., Judge Ira Waite Jayne, '05, -of De-
troit acted as chairman. He spoke
briefly on his experiences when in Ann
Arbor, comparing the debating teams
of those days with those of the present.
He offered a sincere tribute to Prof.
Thomas C. Trueblood, of the depart-
ment of public speaking, for the work
that he has done for the University in
fostering a spirit of interest in .public
speaking and training Michigan's
teams for inter-Conference debates.
"The winning of a debate does not
arouse the feeling of enthusiasm in a
student body that a big football game-
does," said Mr. Jayne. "But there 14
no college in the United Statea w.o
does not feel a real thrill of pride
when its team wins a contest of hr-
tellect over intellect."
Declare Plan Follows Precedent
Michigan advocated the adoption of
the Kansas Industrial Court plan be-
cause they believe it is in line with
the policy of the governnent to pro-
test its people against strikes, that it
follows established precedents, does
not interfere with any particular
groups, is seasonably limited in scope,
and is sufficiently elastic to fit chang-
ing conditions.
Chicago opposed the plan, maintain-
ing that it increased antagonism among
laborers, that an example could not
be drawn from Kansas, that collective
bargaining is a better method of settl-
ing labor disputes, and that Industrial
courts will probably become corrupt.
Judge A. Miller, Lloyd T. Williams,
and Howard Lewis, all of Toledo, act-
ed as judges for the debate. They were
but a moment in awarding a unan-
Imous Rote in favor of Michigan's
speakers.
FINISH ARGUMENT FOR,.
HOER FREIGHT RATE
COAL PRODUCERS GIVE WAY TO
REPRESENTATIVES FROM
STEEL INDUSTRY
(By Assocated Press)
Washington, Jan. 20.-Coal produc-
ers completed their argument in favor
of lower freight rates before the inter.
state commerce commission today and
gave way to representatives of the
steel industry as second in the list to
be taken up in the federal investiga-
tion into transportation rate level.
Robert Hula, for iron and steel man
ufacturers in the Chicago district,
presented the general conclusion that

"present freight rates are a burden
which has undoubtedly contributed to
the existing depression in industry."
He expressed the opinion that the com-
mission should protect the earning
power of the railroad, and declared
that next to coal, steel was the com-
modity to be considered in any rate
reduction found possible.
Throughout the discussion of coal
rates; the commission and experts par-
ticipating sought facts as to impending
wage reduction and probability of a,
strike about April 1.
W. J. Thompson, president of the
Anthracite Producers association; said
mine wage cuts wou14 be egftcOe 3a
April

.I

Funeral services for Prof. Wooster
Woodruff Beman were .held at 2:30
o'clock yesterday afternoon at the
Beman home on Kingsley street. The
services were conducted by Rev.-
Howard Chapman, of the First Bap-
tist church, and Rev. A. L. Wilkin-'I
son.
The honorary pall bearers were:
President Emeritus H. B. Hutchins,;
President Marion L. Burton, Dean
John R. Effinger, Prof. Alexander
Ziwet, Prof. Fred M. Taylor, Prof. J.
L. Markley, Rev. Henry Gelston,
Prof. H. N. Chute, Mr. George Blaich,
and Mr. William Goodyear. ActiveE
pall bearers were: Prof. Peter Field,
Prof. Walter Ford, Prof. J. W. Glov-
er, Prof. J. W. Bradshaw, Prof. H. C.
Carver, and Prof. L. Cr Karpinski.
Interment was at Forest Hill cem-
@tery,

Selection Will Be Announced Aftei
Conference of Alumnae
Council Today
Recommendations concerning the
life membership pins for the Univer-
sity of Michigan League were made
yesterday afternoon at a joint meet-
ing of the Alumnae council, the ad-
visory members of the committee,
chairmen of the standing committees,
and the board of director§ of the
Women's league.-
A detailed description of the pin
will be announced after the plans
have been submitted to the members
of the Alumnae countil today. The
advisability of having a contest
among the women students for pin'
designs was discussed.
More tpan 30 representatives of
Michigan alumnae organizations will
arrive today to attend the regular
mid-winter meeting of t Alumnae
I council which is to beheld in the
Union.
FRENCH PLAY TRYOUT TIME
EXTENDED THROUGH TUESDAY
Time for trying out for the French
play, "La Belle Aventure," which is
to be presented at a later date un-
der the auspices of the Cerc'e Fran-
esis, has been extended to Monday
and Tuesday of next week from 4 to
E 5 o'clock and from 7 to 8 o'clock.
Thfs is due to the large number of
fuvdonts interested in trying out for
the play. There are 30 parts in the
play which will be filled entirely by
students if enough talent is shown in
the tryouts.

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